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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Why Spot the Difference?
Just a quick note to explain why Squeeze have bothered to re-record their greatest hits (and some misses) and release them when there are countless other greatest hit collections out there already.

Basically, they don't own the rights to their own songs, therefore Universal are free to release their songs for use on commercials etc without getting the band's...
Published on 14 Oct 2010 by DanDewey1974

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30 of 33 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Spot the Deference
It's difficult to say quite what Squeeze were trying to achieve with this album. Some have said they released it because of licensing difficulties, but (the separate issue of 'rights' aside, which Chris Difford talks about in one interview) considering the recently-released "Essential Squeeze", I'm not sure what the point would be (although I'm willing to be...
Published on 27 Aug 2010 by Mr. M. Bloomfield


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30 of 33 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Spot the Deference, 27 Aug 2010
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This review is from: Spot the Difference (Audio CD)
It's difficult to say quite what Squeeze were trying to achieve with this album. Some have said they released it because of licensing difficulties, but (the separate issue of 'rights' aside, which Chris Difford talks about in one interview) considering the recently-released "Essential Squeeze", I'm not sure what the point would be (although I'm willing to be enlightened). Alternatively, there was footage on their website featuring Mssrs Difford and Tilbrook talking about Squeeze wanting to be its own best tribute-band, a bizarre act of deference, but one which they quite rightly said they could pull off better than anybody else.

And this is something we're perhaps being asked to consider: as the group has recently re-formed, this is a wonderful way of showing the record-buying (or rather song-downloading) public that the band can still perform with the best of the young guns. It's an opportunity to show they can still sound as bright and as perky as they did all those years ago. This is important, because we hear they'll be releasing new material in the near future, but when I mention them to friends who aren't as ancient as I apparently am, they respond in ways that make you think they're looked upon as 'Golden Oldies', not particularly fashionable, and, well, the sort of thing your dad might listen to, if you bought him a gramophone record. So did it work?

Personally I was a little surprised at myself when I first put this album on. I thought I'd have it on in the background, knowing all the songs already, and wouldn't particularly listen to it; but in reality I was gripped, waiting eagerly for the next track, thinking to myself "just this one, and then I'll go and make a cup of tea... Okay, then I'll listen to the next one aswell..."

You can class what you get on this album into some distinct, yet overlapping groups: many of the songs here - Another Nail, Hourglass, Is That Love, Labelled with Love, Pulling Mussels - sound very much like the originals, perhaps with a little re-mastering having taken place. It's a little spooky listening to them. Others are similar to the originals but actually a little better (I'm thinking of Black Coffee in Bed and Take Me I'm Yours, with Simon Hanson's excellent drumming adding even more urgency to an already 'driven' rhythm); others are slightly different versions, such as Goodbye Girl, Loving You Tonight, and Some Fantastic Place; but sadly there's a fourth group, the songs that don't quite work as well on this album as they did in their original settings (Glenn's voice doesn't quite come off in Up The Junction, I'm still not convinced by his lead vocals on Loving You Tonight, and would be interested to hear whether Chris could do it more justice instead, and his final phrase in Some Fantastic Place sounds a bit... odd). Cool for Cats falls into a category of its own, "the set of songs that don't belong in any set of songs". Chris Difford's voice has changed over the years, and I'm not sure yet what I think about this version. Time will tell - but I don't dislike it.

So this is an album of "Modern" Squeeze trying their best to sound like other incarnations of Squeeze. On the whole, they do it very well indeed. Job done. So there are two ways you can judge this album -

Either:
It's just another re-packaged 'greatest hits' collection, to add to all the others on your shelves (45s & Under, Piccadilly Collection, Excess Moderation, Classics, Master Series, The Squeeze Story, Greatest Hits, Big Squeeze, Essential Squeeze, Millennium Collection, not to mention Six of One, the BBC Sessions and the live albums, and probably a couple of others I've forgotten). Most of the songs sound pretty much the same as the originals, with a few exceptions, and the musicianship and voices, while certainly no worse, haven't got significantly better over the years. All in all a bit like flogging the same old horse (albeit one that's happily coming back to life!).

Or...
It's an interesting, worthwhile and thought-provoking take on the greatest hits idea, better than any singles collection because you get to hear new versions, versions of what they sound like now; and adding that extra twist for fans wanting to know how different takes compare. In other words, you're getting a fine selection of Squeeze's greatest hits, without having to buy the tracks you already have. They've obviously put an awful lot of work into it, and it allows the listener to think a little deeper about the songs he or she owned and thought they knew. An excellent piece of marketing, and a fine gift to fans and newcomers alike.

But when it comes down to it, we have to ask: is there really a difference?
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Why Spot the Difference?, 14 Oct 2010
This review is from: Spot The Difference (Audio CD)
Just a quick note to explain why Squeeze have bothered to re-record their greatest hits (and some misses) and release them when there are countless other greatest hit collections out there already.

Basically, they don't own the rights to their own songs, therefore Universal are free to release their songs for use on commercials etc without getting the band's permission. Also when they do, the band don't make any money from the use of their songs.

These have been re-recorded, so that the band can directly offer their songs for use in commercials and get paid for it.

The songs do sound very similar, sometimes identical to the originals, but I suppose that was the point.

For fans who probably already own countless greatest hits collections, it probably is still worth purchasing for the free bonus CD, that was recorded on the recent USA tour.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Re-Recordings of those Squeeze classics, 17 Aug 2010
By 
C. P. Whiting "G Moonwalker" (Ipswich, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Spot the Difference (Audio CD)
I wasn't sure what to expect from this album. As a Squeeze fan, I intended to purchase it anyway, but based my expectations on the earlier review. By enlarge the earlier review sums this album up very well and I'd tend to agree with most of what was written. I did however personally enjoy hearing these rerecordings very much. It is interesting to hear the difference between Squeeze as they were and what they are now. Many years have passed since these songs were originally released, but Tilbrook and Difford have not by any means lost their magic. Naturally I wouldn't ever want to substitute these versions for the originals, as these were the reason I grew to love their music in the first place. Nothing could replace the magic that the originals gave, however it was nice to hear these songs re-done and I was able to appreciate them in their own right.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars POINTLESS, 23 Oct 2010
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SDB MELLONIE "DOM MELLONIE" (LANCASTER, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Spot The Difference (Audio CD)
A few years' back, Chris Rea issued "New Light Through Old Windows", whereby he re-recorded some of his "hits" with slightly different arrangements. Whilst hardly varying from the original versions, they did (and still do) sit well next to them.
Sadly, Squeeze have effectively just re-recorded their hits here with little, if any variation. They're great songs but bring absolutely nothing new to them (not even a slightly higher octave on the backing vocals!) which is a real pity. Whilst I'm not suggesting they should have got Dizzee Rascal to MC half way through Cool For Cats (although then again...), they could have either re-arranged the songs slightly differently or - as Beautiful South did on a "Later..." programme once - got guest vocalists to sing with them.
So, what we have is a like-for-like recording of some of their best songs..which,as squeeze fans, we already have (a few times over).
What's particularly disappointing is that Chris Difford did record a fantastic re-interpretaion (acoustic and with him on vocals) of many of the same songs 3 or 4 years back on the sublime "South East Side Story" album.!South East Side Story [CD + DVD]
This, I think, was an opportunity missed. Buy "South East Side Story" instead and listen to the original recordings when you want full Squeeze versions.
What a pity..
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars TERRIFIC BAND, CRACK SONGWRITING TEAM - SO SO RECORD, 3 Aug 2010
This review is from: Spot the Difference (Audio CD)
Obviously released to cash in on the extensive American tour, and the Winter trek around the UK, Spot The Difference is possibly the most bizarre record Squeeze have ever released. Basically a collection of their better known singles re-recorded during 2010 featuring the current band line-up and with a guest vocal from Paul Carrack on Tempted.
Quite why messers Difford & Tilbrook wanted to mess with the sublime originals is a mystery, one suspects licensing deals and copywrite might have something to do with it, but whatever the reasons this is for die hard fans only.
In all fairness trying to re-create the recording techniques, the sounds of wobbly antique synths, 70's drum machines and sequencers must have been a nightmare. No Gilson, no Holland and, for the later tracks no 'bendy' bass from Keith Wilkenson. It's also worth noting that both Tilbrook's and Difford's voices have changed and matured over the years.
Some of the tracks work really well - Pulling Muscles From A Shell, Goodbye Girl and Black Coffee In Bed (replete with much tighter backing vocals). Others such as the Tilbrook sung 'Loving You Tonight' pales against the Paul Carrack original and Some Fantastic Place loses much of the emotion and beauty of the sublime original.
The problem is that everything is a little TOO perfect - the energy, the odd mistake, the excitement of knowing just how good they really were is missing.
BIG SQUEEZE is still the best way to enjoy the Deptford boys past glories - plus you get all the great B-Sides.
Next time round lets have a new collection of Difford & Tilbrook originals. Thats what we all really want.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic, 29 Aug 2013
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This review is from: Spot the Difference (Audio CD)
Just a fantastic album, should be in everyone's collection. Squeeze at their best, with a whole load of favourite tracks. So good it could be a best off. One of my favourite groups, and definitely a favourite album, so go and buy your own copy.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Perfect nostalgia, 4 Nov 2012
By 
Mrs. J. V. Lord "JLo" (Brighton) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Spot The Difference (Audio CD)
Great selection of their best hits, musically balanced and evocative of a great era for music. Amazing to think they're still touring.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Can you 'Spot the difference'?, 18 Oct 2010
By 
Hannah Stringfellow "Squeezefan4ever" (Liverpool, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Spot The Difference (Audio CD)
Well, I am slightly biased to say the least, absolutely adoring Squeeze, they could release pretty much anything and i'd buy it!
That aside though, I think they have done a sterling job re-recording their classic songs, and, although hardcore fans will be able to tell the difference between the originals and the new ones on this album (which is inevitable if a song was originally recorded, say, 30 years ago), they still sound fresh and the music and singing is brilliant as always. The only thing I would love to have seen would have been some of their equally brilliant but perhaps more obscure tracks such as 'Slightly Drunk' or 'Messed Around' re-recorded too. Overall, I love it and would totally recommend any Squeeze fan buy it, but with first timers it would be better to reach for 'Essential Squeeze' first in my opinion.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars What a strange thing to do!!, 4 Oct 2010
By 
Alan D. Evans "Big Al" (London) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Spot the Difference (Audio CD)
All these songs are really old! Glen and Chris must've sung them a million times over! Now here they are note for note re-recorded but still in this recreated form they're don't sound fresh and young like the originals
I miss Elvis Costello and Paul Young's backing on Black Coffee in Bed, in fact all these songs lack the atmospheric production they had originally!
Great songs lads!! But Why????
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars I Can Spot The Difference - Can You??!, 19 Aug 2010
This review is from: Spot the Difference (Audio CD)
Being a lifelong Squeeze aficionado, I just had to buy this latest release (mostly out of sheer intrigue!). I'm not entirely sure why mssrs Tilbrook & Difford would want to re-record their greatest hits and make them sound EXACTLY like the originals (but I'm reliably told it's due to copyright & licensing issues...and let's face it, they're probably selling this by the shedload to casual punters on the current US/UK tour).
But having plenty of experience in recording & production, I was fascinated to hear how the 'new' versions would sound using today's production techniques. No mean feat.
And the results are....well, a bit hit & miss really. On one hand, it's entertaining to hear how they've tried to recapture that old analogue sound and create the same 'sonic vibe' as the originals. And some of the tracks really do sound quite wonderful. For example, the new versions of "Black Coffee", "Tempted" and Glenn's vocal version of "Loving You Tonight" really bring something new to the table.

However, some of the other tracks ("Take Me I'm Yours", "Is That Love") sound SO similar to the original, it makes you wonder "er,.....what's the point?!". The originals can't be bettered..!
So, I'm not entirely sure how many times I'm likely to play this new release - because (post listening) all it did for me was to give me an appetite to listen to the originals!

Overall 'though, it's an interesting addition to the Squeeze catalogue and should rightly belong in every Squeeze fan's collection. Buy it. Because, if anything it ably demonstrates that (as ever), that wonderful talent shines as brightly today as it ever did.... good to have you back boys. New album please!!

**UPDATE!!**
Hmmm.... Just discovered that this album has now been re-released with a bonus "live" disc.
Not a happy bunny!! Here we go again: the fans support their favourite band by splashing out their hard-earned cash on the latest release..... only to be ripped off by the record company (who cynically release a 'new' version and expect us to go and buy it all over again)... Thanks a lot. Not!!
It's the sort of tactic we've come to expect from the major labels (who want to milk us for every penny we've got) - but it's not the sort of thing I'd expect from Squeeze's own record label. Shame on you!! I'm docking a point off my review! 3/5 stars!
(And no, I won't be buying it again - I'll "borrow" the live disc from somewhere...)
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