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102 of 102 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very simple to use
We bought this because with 4 teenagers in the house, our energy bill was spiralling out of control. We wanted to get everyone involved in trying to reduce costs and thought that this might help. Well it most certainly does! Took only 10 minutes or so to set up and could instantly see the cost of what was on in the house. We left it running for a week and carried on as...
Published on 15 Mar 2011 by H M Watkins

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40 of 43 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Looks fine, but I couldn't use it!
I set up the monitor with enthusiasm. The instructions were reasonably clear and the remote monitor behaved just fine. Then came the moment of truth: I can't run this monitor (or any other brand) on my system. The sender unit requires separate input mains leads to the consumer unit: my thick, shielded mains cable in an older house just won't work with this device. The...
Published on 4 Feb 2011 by F. Odds


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102 of 102 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very simple to use, 15 Mar 2011
By 
H M Watkins (Dorset United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: NEW!!! Owl + USB Connectivity CM160 Energy Saving Wireless Power Electricity Smart Monitor (DIY & Tools)
We bought this because with 4 teenagers in the house, our energy bill was spiralling out of control. We wanted to get everyone involved in trying to reduce costs and thought that this might help. Well it most certainly does! Took only 10 minutes or so to set up and could instantly see the cost of what was on in the house. We left it running for a week and carried on as usual, noticing when the monitor was particularly high (electric shower, double oven, tumble dryer). We then went around the house switching off all the TVs on standby, lights in unoccupied rooms, computers not being used etc to get the baseline cost as low as possible. As we switched things back on we watched the monitor to see which appliances made the cost jump. We've been able to work out the cost of leaving lights on or a computer all day when no-one is even in the house. After the second week we downloaded the data to the PC and bingo second week's cost was quite a bit less than the first! All the kids have been suggesting ways of reducing costs so it's been really helpful.
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946 of 960 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars See just how much electricity you use, as you use it!, 19 Sep 2010
By 
R. F. Stevens "richard23491" (Ickenham UK) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
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This review is from: NEW!!! Owl + USB Connectivity CM160 Energy Saving Wireless Power Electricity Smart Monitor (DIY & Tools)
A simple clip-on power meter with a handy remote display lets us know how much electricity we are using, how much it is costing, and how much CO2 is being produced. The desirable option of USB connection to the computer allows for usage profiles to be saved and compared, and the supplied software helps us in this task. The transmitter can accommodate up to three clip-on current sensors, allowing use with three-phase electricity.

The wireless range is good and the display on the hand held unit is big and easy to read. Setting up the receiver/handset is simple, and several of the default values were already correct for UK making life even easier.

However, I was less than convinced about its accuracy. So I made up a short extension lead with the neutral wire brought out in a loop for the meter to clamp around, and I tried some simple tests.
1. A fitting containing four 15Watt low-energy fluorescent bulbs - a nominal 60Watts: the meter suggested they were taking 111Watts, almost double the rated power!
2. A freezer rated at 100Watts: it showed 63Watts. Hmm.
3. A plasma screen rated at 300Watts displaying a static test pattern: it flipped between two readings, either 223Watts or 447Watts! What?!
4. A kettle rated at 2000Watts: it went from 2100Watts to 1900Watts, cold to boil, exactly as expected.

I have just compared the readings on my electricity meter with those of the CM160 for 24hour's usage, and the CM160 was 28% high. All of my lighting is low energy fluorescents (but see Addendum 11 for 2014 update), so perhaps they are the main reason for the excess power reading. But I don't know for certain, and I guess it might be something to do with power factors. I will be borrowing a True RMS Ammeter in a couple of days so I can see how the actual current compares with the suggested current measured by the CM160 clamp.

I guess it is better to be pessimistic and show we are using too much. But I want to see the real answers. I've not bothered with looking at the software in detail yet, not until I know if I can trust the CM160. More later.

Addendum 1. 01/10/2010. Software.

The software is basic and simple. I found the way of pushing into the graph to get more detail counter-intuitive to start with, but soon got used to it, as in that respect it is like some CAD programs. One can print the graphs, but they are almost too simplistic, and while one can have four panes, there are only two flavours of graph. I guess where the multiple panes comes into their own is if one has more than the single sensor plugged into the transmitter.

If a permanent and on-going record of the consumption is required, one needs to remember to connect the Owl to the PC at least once a month, otherwise the internal store in the Owl eventually wraps around and writes over the old data.

Addendum 2. 01/10/2010. Accuracy.

I've been able to make some accurate measurements. The results might be interesting to some, very boring for most, prepare to switch off, zzzzz... :^)

Overall Accuracy.
For an eight day average on the whole house the OWL CM160 reads just 1.5% high, much better than my first measurement. The first brief 24-hour spell did not have us doing any significant cooking (electric hob & oven) or tumble drying or washing machine, but had lots of fluorescent light (CFL) in the usage. I've done an audit and my spreadsheet estimates that perhaps 20% of our annual electricity consumption goes on lighting.
The Owl web-site quotes a maximum current in the clamp of 71Amps, and if one assumes 1024 steps on the sensor for approximately 69mA per step then a 230V supply would give us steps of 15.9W, although on mine it seems to be closer to 16.5W steps. This 16W step size was pointed out to me in one of the helpful comments.
The absolute accuracy is consistent on the bigger numbers and within that of the Fluke meter at +/- 0.5% for Resistive loads, such as a set of filament bulbs or a kettle.
eg 1: the Owl showed four 60W filament bulbs used 232W, and the current through the Fluke corresponded to 230W.
eg 2: the Owl showed a 2000W kettle (rolling boil) used 1908W and it was 1902W with the Fluke.
The mains measured at 234V during these last few tests, I had assumed 230V for the earlier set.

Power Factor and CFL?
It is a different story with CFL bulbs however. One cannot even select particular brands as being not compliant with CE standards. Some sets of four 15W CFLs worked out almost correct per bulb at about 17W with both measurements, others (different style but same brand!) were way wrong at up to 33W on Owl and 16W on Fluke! So I put a 1.0 Ohm power resistor in the neutral leg of my test fixture and connected a battery powered oscilloscope across it (ie this laptop with a USB Picoscope 3204). The current waveform of the well behaved 'good' bulbs, while quite lumpy, looked almost like it was trying to be the sine-wave one would expect from a resistive load. But that of the 'bad' bulbs was incredibly spiky, mostly off and then with high peak on-current for a very short time. I noticed that a mobile phone did not work so well near these 'bad' bulbs, which is another indication they do not meet CE standards, despite CE being stamped on the bulbs.

Freezer motor.
Yes, the 100W motor was actually only using 55W, and yet it is not on for much of the time, and the freezer is brilliant. Buy an Electrolux!

Plasma.
This uses a steady 215W with four small kinks in an otherwise clean sine-wave. But then it does have many filters and a dedicated circuit for power-factor correction. I don't know why the Owl occasionally doubles the value, since the Fluke did not, and nor did the oscilloscope show anything strange.

The Verdict?
You can believe the Owl CM160. It is near enough accurate to be eminently fit for purpose. But beware, some manufacturers of electrical equipment are selling non-CE-compliant stuff.

Addendum 3. 22/10/2010. Thermometer

There is a simple digital thermometer incorporated in the receiver, and I thought I had better check it as well. I already have two independent digital temperature measurement devices from Oregon Scientific as well as two old-fashioned Factories Act thermometers (RS Components 301-757). The Oregon base unit and its external MSF receiver and thermometer and hygrometer combo unit both indicated 22.0C, and the Factories Act thermometers were both on the 22C line, when the Owl indicated 22.8C. The Owl's accuracy is reasonable for non-scientific use, but I would expect a modern digital unit to be more precise than this.

Having recently asked the people at Owl, they told me it is not intended as an accurate instrument, but merely as a `helpful guide to usage' and they actually suggested 5% as the accuracy limits!

Addendum 4. 22/10/2010. Software

I have a problem with the software, not apparent when I first tried it after only a couple of days of use. If I push down into a month bar I find that not all the days in a month are accessible, only the middle six.

I've reported this to Owl, and they are looking into it.

29/10/2010
I originally tried it on a 3GHz XP machine. It is now working exactly the same on this 1.8GHz W2KP laptop, just the same, although W2KP is not listed on the install CD label. :^)

Addendum 5. 29/10/2010. Battery Life.

The Receiver unit has run out of battery today after just seven weeks of use; the 4.75V of three new AA cells was down to 2.45V only. It still remembered all the info however, and the only detail that has been missed is a few hours overnight, and the clock was three hours slow but still trying to tick on. It is happy to run on the USB with no batteries in, so I've left it plugged into a permanently powered USB socket to see if the fresh batteries last more than seven weeks.

I am surprised at how quickly this has run down. The Oregon Scientific weather station I mentioned above uses much the same 2.4GHz technology and those batteries last a couple of years in each unit.

The Sensor unit still has ample battery showing at 4.55V for the three AA cells.

Addendum 6. 18/12/2010 Battery Life - again.

The receiver batteries still run down even though it has been plugged into a permanently powered USB hub! Not as rapidly as before, but after another seven weeks the three Duracells are now down to 3.9V, ie about half discharged. I would have expected no discharge if the 'free' USB power was being used for everything.

The Sensor unit still has ample battery showing at 4.45V for the three AA cells.

Addendum 7. 18/12/2010 Software.

The store and display software has behaved itself for the last couple of months, with no missing days. So I have to assume there was a problem I did not notice with the earlier locations of the transmitter and receiver, and the receiver just ignored data it did not receive properly.

The USB driver is another matter though. It does not work properly if the laptop goes into Standby with the Owl connected, and an Unresolved Interrupt conflict forces a cold boot on Restart. However, if I unplug the Owl just for the five seconds during which the W2K laptop goes into Standby, then everything is fine on the instant Restart. My two other permanently connected USB devices cause no such problems. Maybe this is sloppy programming, and maybe the more fault tolerant XP or W7 will cope.

Addendum 8. 08/09/2011. First anniversary, update.

Both units are still working satisfactorily after a year in continuous service, with the Sensor battery measuring at 4.00V for the original three Duracell AA cells.

I've not bothered to use the USB data logging software for several months now, ever since it caused the boot problems on my ancient laptop. It is now un-installed. However we find the remote display is still very useful, and works well with rechargeable batteries. But beware that not all rechargeable cells have a long enough positive terminal to reach into the recessed contacts in the holder.

Addendum 9. 28/6/2012. Sender Batteries.

At long last the sensor transmitter stopped sending data, and it required new batteries, and this was also indicated on the receiver display. The ones I took out had dropped to 3.1V in total, and lasted about 20 months. New batteries, and within about a minute of plugging in the current clamp the readings had commenced again on the receiver display.

Addendum 10. 10/11/2013. An additional monitor.

I've recently bought the Belkin F7C005 13Amp plug monitor. This should be regarded as an additional device for testing individual appliances, while leaving the Owl (or similar) monitoring the whole household. The Belkin has similar accuracy on higher power devices, with the advantage of a much smaller quantising window (about 0.1Watts) offering finer resolution, but it is limited to the maximum power of a 13Amp socket. Think of it as being another tool in the box, and doing a slightly different job.

Addendum 11. 04/04/2014. LED lighting.

Over the course of the last year or so I have replaced all of the remaining halogen lamps, CFL lamps and fluorescent tube fittings inside the house with LED lights of various kinds, and the average power consumption has seen a worthwhile drop, not as much as the change from old fashioned incandescent bulbs to CFL, but still significant. Best of all, the LED light is nicer than CFL and instant.

I took a box of more than 30 mostly working CFLs, (8W to 18W) to Recycling. The LED lamps replace them either directly or in different configurations to take advantage of the different quality of the light with the LED bulbs varying from 3W to 10W.

LED lighting for a year now uses 750-850KWh
CFL lighting used to use about 1300-1400KWh
Incandescent used to burn approx 2400-2800KWh (calculated with the help of the spreadsheet and simply replacing the LEDs with equivalent incandescent bulbs.)

Addendum 12. 04/04/2014. Usage Spreadsheet.

Perhaps the thing I have found most educational (but also extremely boring) was to have built the spreadsheet listing the electrical items in each room, how long they might be on for, and how much each used in a year. Some high-power items were surprisingly reasonable in usage (eg clever AEG heat-pump tumble dryer at 350KWh per annum), others rather more greedy (eg desktop computer and associated bits about 300KWh per annum).

It also allows me to theoretically test different items for possible usage and costs just by changing wattage and on-time, and see if it is significant compared with everything else. I singled out the lights as a special case because they tended to be left on the longest.

The Belkin plug monitor helped a lot with nailing down more precisely the expected annual consumption for intermittently used things like the tumble dryer and the computer.
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42 of 43 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Save Money install a Smart Monitor Meter, 18 Oct 2010
This review is from: NEW!!! Owl + USB Connectivity CM160 Energy Saving Wireless Power Electricity Smart Monitor (DIY & Tools)
I purchased an OWL + USB Connectivity CM160 CM160 to monitor electric energy consumption. Boy has this little meter opened my eyes to just how much electricity we consume. As a household we are now making a concerted effort to switch off any energy device that is not essential and cut down on the use of high consuming items such as the washing machine and tumble drier. The only down side as far as my family are concerned is that I have turned into the mother from hell as I am constantly yelling "Turn it off the meter has gone into orbit"!! This little meter is definately a good purchase for any household that wants to cut its energy bills.
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53 of 55 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars OWL meter to monitor solar power production, 21 Feb 2011
This review is from: NEW!!! Owl + USB Connectivity CM160 Energy Saving Wireless Power Electricity Smart Monitor (DIY & Tools)
I bought this product to monitor the production of electricity from a domestic solar array. I already have Efergy Elite energy meter for the house usage so can compare the functions of these two devices. I will not comment on the accuracy of the readings etc since there is already a really excellant review by Richard Stevens on this.

The OWL meter is a data logger so will record and store values of power usage at 1 minute resolution for up to 1 month. When connected to a computer the meter will give a live output every 10 seconds and the stored data is an average of 6 values. I found it very simple to set up and the connectivity between the sender (in my roof for the solar array) and the display has acceptible range; the display works anywhere in the house. The software was installed under windows 7 (64bit) and worked first time; I seamed to have less problems than Richard Stevens with the software; I guess they have brought out a better version with some fixes.

The monitor display shows the instantaneous power usage (or CO2/cost) and the power usage since the meter was reset along with the date and temperature.

As a simple meter it has some limitations compared to the Efergy Elite; actually because it does more technically. In the Efergy Elite you can easily review with a single button press the power usaged today, yesterday and so on for 1 week. The same goes for weekly usage and monthly usage. The OWL requires you to press buttons about 7 times to set up the start date and date range before it display the usage for the day/week/month/year. If you just want to see what power you used today/yesterday then it is tedious and requires the instructions every time due to the complexity of multiple button presses. Ie, for reviewing your power usage on the display unit then the design is quite useless.

As a data logger - where you want to capture fine detail of power usage (or production in a solar array) and store/look at this on a computer - then this meter is very good. The Efergy may be simple to review the last 7 days, but it is very limited beyond this.

Connecting up the meter to the computer and registering the device is quite slow - taking many seconds. After this, data transfer is also quite slow too, but I guess this is not really a big problem. The software is not polished, but allows you display real time power (cost/CO2/amps) or look at the history from a database of downloaded data. I found it faily easy to use the software to look at the data, but setting up the device the first time in the program is a little counter intuitive

Once the data is downloaded you can look at the history by year, month, day and hour by clicking on graph data points. Up to 4 graphs can be display at one time for comparison. As a meter for reviewing power generation from a solar array this is really an excellant device as it is possible to look at power generation as a function of time of year, shading and keep a detailed record at a resolution of 1 minute. According to the documentation, although I have not yet tried, you can write out the raw data suitable for loading into Excel. Hopefully I will add an additional comment later once I tested this.

So in summary, if you want a simple to use stand alone meter then get the Efergy Elite; it so very much easier to review recent usage by day/week/month. If you want to analyse your power usage on a computer in a lot of detail then this OWL meter is excellant considering the cost and what you get - a data logger and software to analyse this data.

Finally : for anyone wanting to use one of these with micro-generation then all these cheap power meters currently have a limitation. They are designed to be very easy to set up which means it does not matter how you connect up the current clamp - you always get a positive reading on the display. This means you cannot review whether you are actually exporting or importing electricity from the national grid, since you always see a positive power reading.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Useful but loss of data from design flaw, 1 Mar 2011
By 
Nick Lindridge "ionCube" (London, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: NEW!!! Owl + USB Connectivity CM160 Energy Saving Wireless Power Electricity Smart Monitor (DIY & Tools)
Having read the excellent review from Richard, we went ahead with this item and would say that it's not bad. However, there are some caveats.

1: Accuracy: In our setting it over estimates usage by around 10% to 15% or so, perhaps from using an induction hob and phase control by DMX dimmers of some sizeable underfloor heating zones. This isn't a big issue in practice however.

2: Firmware/software: A design flaw resulted in multiple dropped days of data when connected to a PC to sync the database; i.e. connecting after 10 days might load the most recent day or two and not populate for the preceding 8. This was a crippling problem in our setting that would ultimately render the purchased unit of little long term use, but may have been resolved in more recent units.

3. Software: The client software has a non-standard GUI design that irritatingly floats above all other windows, and has limited features and analytics. It could benefit from a ground up redesign.

4. The Unit: The unit itself, setting up, readability and usage are fine.

5. Support: The issue of lost data was raised with Owl. With no way to update the firmware in the unit via USB, they arranged to swap out the unit without any hassle (thanks Dave), so they met expectations there. We'll find out soon if the replacement has resolved the issue.

6. Conclusion: It's a reasonable monitor and the problem was handled well by Owl. Hopefully better client software will emerge over time. I would recommend.
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40 of 43 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Looks fine, but I couldn't use it!, 4 Feb 2011
By 
F. Odds - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: NEW!!! Owl + USB Connectivity CM160 Energy Saving Wireless Power Electricity Smart Monitor (DIY & Tools)
I set up the monitor with enthusiasm. The instructions were reasonably clear and the remote monitor behaved just fine. Then came the moment of truth: I can't run this monitor (or any other brand) on my system. The sender unit requires separate input mains leads to the consumer unit: my thick, shielded mains cable in an older house just won't work with this device. The instructions do warn that the Owl won't work on shielded input cables, but that's a bit late. This should be spelt out clearly in the product description.
I could have sought a refund but instead passed on the machine to a family member as a Christmas gift.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A much improved product, 21 Sep 2011
By 
D. Fowler (Bedfordshire, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: NEW!!! Owl + USB Connectivity CM160 Energy Saving Wireless Power Electricity Smart Monitor (DIY & Tools)
This new CM160 version of the popular Owl Energy Monitor CM119 is so much more useful than the previous version (which had no USB port) that I'm sure the old version will soon be withdrawn from sale. It combines the recording facilities of the USB Connect CM120 with the display-only CM119.

Both the CM160 and CM119 have a wireless - linked transmitter which you attach to your power cables.

The CM120 can receive data from several CM119 (and also CM160) transmitter units and transfer the data to a computer via a USB link. The CM119 has a display which can be read to see the current energy use. The CM160 combines the same display with a USB port and an internal memory which can store up to 30 days' minute-by-minute energy use.

Previously if you wished to keep a record of how your power usage varied throughout the day / month / year, you had to use a CM120 connected to a permanently 'on' computer. (The CM120 has no internal storage). This in some way defeated the object of trying to monitor and reduce your power consumption as the computer had to remain on 24/7.

The new CM160 has an internal data store which keeps track of your energy use until you next turn on your computer. The data is then transferred to the computer and stored on disk.

One thing that may help some people with strange software (driver) problems. I connected the USB lead to the computer (Vista 64 bit) and expected the usual 'found new hardware - searching for drivers dialog'. What happened was unexpected. I just got a message saying drivers installed. Nothing worked. On investigating I found the drivers it had chosen were some old 32 bit drivers I had loaded a year ago in an unsuccessful attempt to install an ancient 'Road Angel' speed camera device. I had to uninstall both the OWL software and the Road Angel drivers and then do a re-install of the OWL software before everything worked correctly. There has not been a single problem with the software since this initial hiccup.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A useful little gadget but with a couple of drawbacks..........., 21 May 2014
This review is from: NEW!!! Owl + USB Connectivity CM160 Energy Saving Wireless Power Electricity Smart Monitor (DIY & Tools)
The first drawback became obvious when the monitor, which had been been working fine, started showing a usage of zero when there were still appliances operating in my house. The wireless indicator was showing a strong signal. Turning on a high current device, such as the electric kettle, kicked the thing back into life and it began operating normally again. This happened several times, so I emailed Owl support to see if they could offer an explanation. I received the following response:

"Please note that our products are designed to provide useful indication information showing both live and historic data and usage / generation patterns. It is not meant to be or to replace metering products. Due to the limitations of the current clamp sensors, all products of this type will have a level of inaccuracy. These sensors only measure the current flowing, they cannot measure the voltage or the power factor and assumptions therefore have to be made (Our defaults are 230v and PF 1.0) in the calculations. Equipment capable of such measurements would be relatively costly and have to be wired into the circuit by an electrician.
When the consumption is below 300W it is possible that you will encounter large errors that are outside the limits of the clamp technology used, however over a longer mixed period the consumption values should be within the 5-10%.
Standard Sensor Clamp Accuracy
Current RMS Watts (230V) Accuracy
<1A <230W Not specified
1A to 3A 230W to 690W Better than 10%
3A to 71A 690W to 16.3kW Better than 5%
>71A >16.3kW Not specified
You could perhaps change the voltage setting on your device and see if this makes a difference to your readings."

In short, if you're using less than 300W, current clamp technology is not good enough to guarantee you a true reading. So if you're looking for a device to give you absolutely accurate usage/cost data you're going to be disappointed.

The other little niggle is that when you plug the monitor into your computer, the software gives you no indication that data is actually being downloaded, or when it has finished doing so.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Owl + USB, 2 Oct 2011
By 
GrahamHP (Chelmsford) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: NEW!!! Owl + USB Connectivity CM160 Energy Saving Wireless Power Electricity Smart Monitor (DIY & Tools)
Excellent product, did every thing we needed and really helped to make us aware of how much electricity we are using, especially when the alam goes off because consumption was too great. Only complaint is the quality of the software for use with the USB download feature, it is a bit crude and not terribly useful in drawing comparrisons from one period to another. Otherwise a great product.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars That's where the electricity goes., 25 Nov 2010
By 
I. Bush (UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: NEW!!! Owl + USB Connectivity CM160 Energy Saving Wireless Power Electricity Smart Monitor (DIY & Tools)
I was amazed at how power hungry some of my appliances are. This monitor is a really useful device that shows me how much electricity I am using at night from TV and computers left on.
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