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1 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 16 September 2010
Very amusing and informative but should be read in small parts with significant intervals - somewhat repetitive
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 27 March 2010
very honest. good read and very insightful on those politicians he works with. Makes you realise that the government is all about presentation and Chris Mullins isn't.
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5 of 14 people found the following review helpful
on 9 September 2011
Just finished the book tonight and couldn't wait to! (bit of a stickler for finishing indifferent books)
Let's face it...Mullin is ultimately a yes man with a very quiet voice when saying no. No passion like Skinner
or intellect like Benn. He is a very average politician and his diaries demonstrate this.
I personally thought it glaringly obvious that references to Dr David Kelly were absent and a 'conscientious' politician like Mullin should have had some viewpoint to share? He only refers to the inquiry findings and thus forms part of the support for the criminal conclusions from Hutton. I urge you; do not waste your time on this dribble and go and buy a proper book that will properly inform, educate and enlighten you. In short, this is political soap of the non lathering kind!
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 11 October 2010
Not bad for a political pot boiler. havent quite finished it yet.
Only worth the £4-58 i paid for a s/hand copy.
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2 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on 21 July 2010
This book has a few interesting comments in it - but 80%is the most pedestrian stuff, very little that is either deep, perceptive or amusing.

His diary is generally backward looking - i.e. what happened today. he is a pure observer - a voyeur.

A very average man totally out of his depth as a minister. He knew it and his bosses knew it.

He often just lists the newspaper headlines for the day, he is not a bright or perceptive man.

How did such a Mister average. get to be a minister? He is pretty inoffensive, he does what he is told, and it stops him being a nuisance lefty on the back benches.

He is totally in awe of the "big beasts" like Blair, Straw, prescott and even Claire short.

There are some really good diaries: brandreth's is on a much much higher level.

try it before you buy it.
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6 of 20 people found the following review helpful
on 12 April 2009
I have already read a variety of books and articles about this period of recent political history and feel that Chris Mullin's diaries add little to what I already knew. His writing is not sufficiently interesting and the points he makes not suffiently original to warrant the size of the book and the time needed to digest it.
In the earlier part of the book he often appears demotivated, while depicting himself as a politician with little real influence or commitment to the post he has accepted. He so often says "No!", consistently refusing to carry out tasks if they happen to contravene the code that he has unilaterally formulated, eg not to spend time away from his constituency and family at the weekend.
Later, as a backbencher and committee member, with greater influence and access to the leadership, he manages to voice his support for (arguably) worthier issues.
But even then I feel that his diaries do not paint a particularly warm, likeable or sympathetic character.

Perhaps I have missed something?
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0 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 29 January 2011
This is just the sort of book for a confirmed socialist ( in my case, my youngest son). Recommended!
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1 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on 30 March 2010
The book started well and he is a maverick. However, the diary became self-serving as it went on and was finally quite difficult to finish.
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16 of 60 people found the following review helpful
I used to admire Chris Mullin for his campaign for the Brum Six but Tony Blair's New Labour brought a decent man down, diminished him to being just another New Labour suit angling for some crummy sub-Cabinet job. He wanted to vote for Iraq but his constituency party in Sunderland South wouldn't let him break his pledge to vote against the war. Pathetic. And how he despised the unemployed working class people who kept sending him to Westminster from jobless Sunderland. "Whingers" and "whiners" he called them. He writes of his disgust and contempt for gangs of feral youths in Geordieland, calling them "Thatcher's children." Hang on Chris. This lot wasn't even born when Thatcher left office. They're "Blair's children" so what did you do for them in the eleven years of New Labour governance while jobs crumbled away in Sunderland? Answer: zilch, How did you put it in the diaries in 2005? "Thank goodness I'm in a safe seat. I couldn't bear to be out of work in my fifties with two young children to support." So, now you've decided to stand down, welcome to everyone else's real world in the worst recession since the Thirties. Have a nice day, Chris. Peter Dunn.
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2 of 13 people found the following review helpful
on 15 March 2010
Not to be compared with Chips Channon or Alan Clark. Not as good as Alistair Campbell. It's on a par with Giles Brandereth.
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