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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great for the price
Having suffered with BT's Home Hub for a while, and then a terrible Belkin (Belkin Wireless N600 Modem Router ADSL (BT Line)), I've decided to try Apple's Apple Airport Extreme 802.11n 5th Generation, as we're a fairly OS X- and iOS-heavy household. As the AirPort Extreme doesn't include a modem, I needed a separate modem to get online, and this fits the bill cheaply and...
Published on 22 Nov 2012 by Alex R

versus
90 of 96 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Oh Dear ... What a Disappointment!
I bought a TP-Link TD-8817 modem in conjunction with the Asus RT-N66U router, as the two in combination was highly recommended by many Amazon reviewers and in other forums. I had decided to update my home network as my existing Netgear DGN5500 modem/router was creaking under the strain of a home demanding a lot from its wireless network, causing frequent wireless...
Published 19 months ago by MG of Middlesex


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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Better than the Vigor 120, 7 Sep 2012
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I bought a Vigor 120 based on all the reviews and it's compatibility with the Airport Extreme.
All was good, no configuration, worked straight out of the box.
However after 6mths of use I started to get latency issues and poor performance.
After going numerous rounds with BT I decided to try an old router modem I had. Problems gone.
Turns out this is an issue with some Vigor 120's. Excellent performance but they don't last.
I have now bought a TP Link 8817 for £15, which also worked straight out of the box with my Airport Extreme and is giving the same performance as the Vigor 120!! I would strongly recommend going for the TP Link.
Excellent price and same performance and interoperability as the Vigor.
Works perfectly with the Airport Extreme.

I will revisit the review after 6mths.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Cheap and easy!, 23 Dec 2013
By 
MuK (Scotland) - See all my reviews
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Had to move to an area without BT Infinity, but wanted to continue to use my Asus RT-N56U Router, so thought I'd give this a try.

Setup was not too tricky for standard BT Broadband, thanks to previous reviewers. Set it to Bridge Mode, selected PPoE, turned DHCP off, changed the VPI to 0 and the VCI to 38, used the user name bthomehub@btbroadband.com, and used the password 'bt'. Finally changed the IP to 192.168.2.1. (Don't change this until the end, as otherwise you might find it tricky to reconnect to it without using the reset switch). Then plugged it in to the wall and the Asus Router, and off it went.

I've had no problems with it that I'm aware of, and I am getting the same speeds I was with the BT hub. I've now got it connected to a powerline converter, with my router in a more useful room, and there has been no speed drop or other trouble, which perhaps says more about the powerline converters than anything else.

All in all, very pleased!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Worked out of the box!, 5 Sep 2013
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Lots of people are confused about what this modem does.
Simply put, it connects to a phone socket in the wall that has a broadband or highspeed signal coming into the house or office via the phone line. It converts that signal (ADSL) so a separate router can distribute it around the house or the office via direct Ethernet cable connection (fast) or by wifi (fast enough).
So it has a regular BT or US phone cable going to the wall socket, a power cable for, guess what, power, and an Ethernet cable connecting to the separate router or directly to your PC for first time set up.
Having an ADSL modem as a separate entity to a combination modem-router gives you greater flexibility to upgrade your router without having to buy a modem, or vice-versa.
In addition, most high-speed or broadband internet service providers like to lock their customers into 12 - 24 month deals. They use the free supply of an ADSL modem to crowbar the customer into a longer contract. So, if you have your own ADSL modem, and punch in the relevant settings, it gives you the flexibility to sign up to shorter contracts, or not have a contract at all.
Setting the modem up is a matter of talking to it directly via its Ethernet port, from a desktop of laptop computer (bypass the router).
The user interface is a web-page built into the modem and accessed by punching an IP address into your browser.
Your internet service provider's username settings and platform need to be entered by following the set-up prompts. You get your service provider's settings by making a call to their tech support line and, if you get lucky, being talked through a relatively simple process.
Mine worked straight out of the box, and hooked up to a Trendnet wifi router I bring with me on my global travels.
An issue that I am aware of with a modem and router connected like this, is that some other devices such as VOIP boxes or network printers can have local DNS addresses or ranges hardwired into them that clash with the router's automatic allocation of addresses.
If all of your cable connections and ISP settings are OK and you are having a problem talking to something you used not to have a problem talking to, think of the latter as a possible cause, and scour your system to make sure everything is set to automatic selection of addresses.
As a rule of thumb though, the default settings tend to cause least issues. I hope this helps.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Simple, easy to setup, does the job., 18 Jan 2013
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Nice little modem, cheap, the setup screen is simple and gets to the point.

The modem is more than capable of setting up your account which is perfect for a single computer but if you are running this with side a more expensive wireless router then just set this little fellow in bridge mode and let the router take care of the account settings such as PPPoE, PPTP etc, that way the modem becomes a nice simple little box that allows you to connect to your router's WAN port. Bridge mode is just going into "Interface Setup" and selecting it on the ISP menu

I've heard some reports that these can get hot and overheat, my one runs cool, I assume that's possibly due to the fact it's acting as a simple bridge and not engaging in any firewall and account activities hence raising the heat on it's chips, which is another reason I let my ASUS router take care of that stuff, taking the stress off this, could be wrong though.

Leave this as 192.168.1.1 and set the router up for 192.168.2.1 And your good to go.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars if under £20 its worth every penny., 26 May 2011
For the price you pay, This is worth every penny. From my experience, It doesn't get hot and it does not disconnect. I could not ask for more.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Sky Broadband Users - Best Read Before Buying TD-8817, 1 Jun 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Having bought this low-cost TD-8817 modem/router along with an ASUS-Wireless Router RT-N66U, and having spent time searching the various Forums, I just wanted to summarise things specifically for Sky DSL Broadband users:

1. Does the above combination work together on Sky BB? Yes
2. Does the above combination allow you to use the advanced features of the ASUS N66U router? No

So in summary, if you want a good, low-cost modem (sub £15) with some routing capabilities the TP-Link TD-8817 is 'good enough'. If you want more, then I'm now going to buy the Draytek Vigor 120 (around £50). If you're interested to learn the 'why' behind both these statements, then please read-on.

Does it work and why is it 'good enough'?

On the TD:
Deactivate all the PVC's except PVC0
Set the LAN IP to be 10.5.0.1, subnet 255.255.255.252 (this means it only gives out 1 IP...10.5.0.2)
Keep DHCP switched-on (so that it gives an IP address to the WAN port on the N66U e.g. 10.5.0.2)
Keep the TD NAT switched-on
Switch-off the firewall and QoS (both are on the N66U)
Sky adsl is PPOA and MUX or LLC encapsulation (both the latter work)

On the N66U:
WAN Configuration - set to 'Automatic IP', enable NAT, auto DNS or input OpenDNS for example.
LAN Configuration - set this up the way you would normally do (making sure the IP range is something like 10.5.1.0 (with LAN IP 10.5.1.1 with other 10.5.1.2/3/4 etc IP's given out by DHCP))

Switch-off both devices, switch the TD on first - wait 'til all the lights are on - then connect the WAN port on the N66U to the TD ethernet port and power-up the N66U and you should see via the N66U's browser-based management console that the N66U's WAN IP is 10.5.0.2 and that the Internet light on the router is flashing. Be aware that you have it working in what's called 'Double-NAT'ing' (as NAT is on both the modem and the router) - this can cause problems with some online games.

Why doesn't this allow use of the advanced feature-set? Because the WAN IP of the N66U is 'private' and you can't reach it from anywhere on the Internet. So if you want to create a VPN to the N66U (so you can use iPlayer and the like whilst you're overseas) or if you want to use OpenDNS for web content filtering, then you need the Draytek modem. Why? Because the TD-8817 doesn't (to my knowledge now) bridge between Sky's PPOA and the N66U's PPOE. The TD has an option to enable a (software) bridge port for PPOE but this is no use if the TD has to be set-up in PPOA to get an internet connection from Sky. If Sky used PPOE then this TD device would do the basic AND the advanced stuff because the TD would connect on PPOE and pass its internet IP through to the N66U (which is also on PPOE). I've read a few threads about putting the TD in 'bridge' mode. Again this is no use if you are a Sky BB customer because you're bridging to the N66U which can't connect using PPOA (you can only configure PPOE on the N66U).

So, what makes the Draytek different is that it CAN bridge between PPOA (on the Draytek) and PPOE (on your N66U). This will mean the Draytek passes Sky's internet IP through to the WAN interface on the N66U - meaning that you can now reach the N66U from anywhere on the internet. As the Sky internet IP is dynamic, there is an option on the N66U to set-up DDNS which seamlessly manages any change in your Sky dynamically allocated public IP (say you rebooted the modem, every time you do this, Sky allocate you a different internet IP, you would not know how to connect by IP if you were overseas).

I also read somewhere that if you're further than 1.5 or 2 miles from your Exchange then the TD didn't work - that's cabling rather than line of sight distance btw. Unsure if this is true - but bear it in mind.

The key point is that if your ISP uses PPOE then the TD is fine, it's a combination of Sky using PPOA with the TD not bridging to PPOE, that means Draytek's PPOA to PPOE in-built bridge does the trick.

Hope that helps explain why some people say 'it works/it doesn't' and why, depending on your ISP, even the basic/advanced 'it works' is more difficult for Sky BB users to understand?

If I've missed a trick please let me know.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Exactly what I hoped for, 15 April 2013
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If you're looking at this thinking its a bit cheap, will it be reliable, will it drop the connection, will it have crappy firmware? So was I and I am glad to say in the last couple of months its been totally reliable, has a great responsive web UI and firmware and has given me the best rate on my line and a mile from my exchange. Its my 3rd piece of TP-Link kit and I am fairly impressed with them.

My 7 year old Belkin Mimo G router was totally reliable but I wanted an wireless N router. My ISP gave a low end N modem/router which had firmware issues and couldn't hold ADSL2+ reliably. That never got above 12MB and the Belkin achieved 13.7Mb, this TP-LINK achieved the full 16Mb I can expect on my line and I am about 1 mile from my exchange. Flicking through the menus, it is fully featured a modem/router, albeit with one port. I didn't try any of it as I put it straight into PPPOE mode and connected it to my separate ASUS RT-N66U.

I am a plug and play, never read the manual sort of person but this had some serious stickers all over it telling you to run the CD and follow the instructions, so I did and had no problems going through the wizard. I connected my PC to the LAN port, followed the wizard and got on the internet in 2 mins. Getting it to play with my wireless router required a bit more faff, I changed the IP address of the modem to 192.168.2.1 and left my router on 192.168.1.1, then made sure DHCP was turned off on the modem and configured it to operate in as a PPPOE modem.

I ended up using the USB cable at one point and still use it now to check on the modem. You cannot access the web interface over the LAN once its configured for PPPOE the other side of your router. However, you CAN have it working as a modem on the LAN port and simultaneously and access the admin page from the USB cable connection. So no faffing with swapping cables if you need to configure it, both USB and LAN cables are in the box along with the mini-CD, manual and PSU. The PSU is typical of what you get these days with a separate plate to allow you slot in the UK 3 pin adapter. Make sure it clicks firmly into place, I found it a bit wobbly at first.

I chose a separate modem/router after reading reviews of combined ADSL/Modem Wireless N, Gigabit Ethernet routers are at the top end of home routers and tend to either have great features, but a poor modem, good modem, then firmware issues etc. Yes you need two plugs and two boxes but if that's not an issue it makes things more flexible and means I won't have to replace the WHOLE router when we get fibre.

In the meantime this is an excellent ADSL2+ modem and an ideal companion to a separate router.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Sadly unreliable, 17 April 2014
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This review is from: TP-Link TD-8840T ADSL2+ Modem Router for Phone Line Connections (Accessory)
Got this to back to back test against current ADSL router as it was only £15. Sadly it is even more unreliable than my existing router, always disconnecting and attempting to re-connect to the internet. It got a good connection speed when it did, but it wouldn't last more than an hour and had a habit of repeatedly failing to re-connect until I rebooted it.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Limited configuration options, 10 April 2014
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This review is from: TP-Link TD-8840T ADSL2+ Modem Router for Phone Line Connections (Accessory)
It's a cheap router and for a lot of people it would be fine.

I was trying to use it with DHCP on the WAN (ADSL) and static IP /28 on the LAN, unfortunately it could not cope with this.

However, I have to say that the TP Link Tech support was excellent, and they rapidly admitted that the product would not meet my needs, which saved me hours of messing around.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars TP-Link TD-8816 (with Airport Time Capsule) on Orange network (EE), 1 Aug 2013
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I can confirm this works with an Apple Airport Time Capsule on an Orange (EE) supplied ADSL connection. Setup of each device was easy, despite the options within the modem appearing bewildering at first. Ultimately each device's setup assistant did all the configuration. So, initial impressions are good. I'll report again in a month or two. N.B. There's an ethernet cable in the TP-link modem box.
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