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94 of 100 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The steep learning curve of a Marine officer warrior
"(Filling sandbags,) the small E-tool burned his blisters and sores. He watched the blood and pus from the jungle rot on his fingers and wrists smear in with the mud and rainwater. He paused occasionally to wipe his hands on his trousers, not even thinking that he had to sleep in them. Everything soon had the same greasy consistency anyway, mixing in with the urine that...
Published on 25 Mar 2010 by Joseph Haschka

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48 of 51 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars I fought in a different Vietnam War
I read the novel primarily because I had served as an Army infantry lieutenant in Vietnam during 1967 and 1968. Generally I prefer to read non-fiction and have not read a novel of the Vietnam War since Tim O'Brien's 1979 novel, Going After Cacciato. I found myself becoming immersed as the author was dealing with similar issues such as gaining the respect of his men upon...
Published on 1 Aug 2011 by A. T. Lawrence


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94 of 100 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The steep learning curve of a Marine officer warrior, 25 Mar 2010
By 
Joseph Haschka (Glendale, CA USA) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)   
"(Filling sandbags,) the small E-tool burned his blisters and sores. He watched the blood and pus from the jungle rot on his fingers and wrists smear in with the mud and rainwater. He paused occasionally to wipe his hands on his trousers, not even thinking that he had to sleep in them. Everything soon had the same greasy consistency anyway, mixing in with the urine that he couldn't quite cut off because he was so cold, the semen from his last wet dream, the cocoa he'd spilled the day before, the snot he rubbed off, the pus from his skin ulcers, the blood from the popped leaches, and the tears he wiped away so nobody would see that he was homesick." - A teenage Marine in the field, in MATTERHORN

MATTERHORN is the phenomenal first-novel by Karl Marlantes about the experience of being a Marine infantryman in Vietnam. Even if you didn't know (from the book's back cover) that the author is a veteran of that conflict, you'd know from the very first page that he'd been there and experienced or witnessed all it had to offer: the mud, leeches, jungle rot, immersion foot, drenching rain, fog, mosquitoes, tigers, C-rations, dank hooches, weaponry, scout dogs, jungle marches, razor-sharp elephant grass, barbed wire, entrenchments, infantry assaults, mortar attacks, battlefield first-aid, perilous helicopter missions, racism, fraggings, exhaustion, supply failures, death of friends, horrific wounds, land mines, incompetent command leadership, ammunition shortages, dysentery, close-up and personal killing, terror, boredom, homesickness, short-timer sticks, and blood-lust. Also, the simple pleasures of a warm Coke or hot coffee on the front lines or a cold beer and cleansing shower in the relative relaxation of a rear staging area.

The novel's hero is Second Lieutenant Waino Mellas, the boot commander of the First Platoon, Bravo Company, First Battalion, Twenty-Fourth Regiment, Fifth Marine Division. At the opening of the narrative, Bravo Company occupies Fire Support Base Matterhorn in the jungle highlands of northwest South Vietnam in the corner formed by the Demilitarized Zone and Laos.

All of the combat action takes place on or around Matterhorn, a wretched hill of no inherent value except as a strategic position from which to engage and interdict the North Vietnamese Army. To battalion and regimental command, it's but a map coordinate. To the grunt Marines, it's a place where they're sent to die or be maimed.

To Mellas, a Marine Reserve officer out of Princeton University, Matterhorn is the forge that will make him a combat leader. And, while he'll come to realize the futility of the conflict that was America's Vietnam imbroglio, he will also come to value the camaraderie, loyalty and true grit demonstrated by a group of young men - not much more than overgrown kids, really - in desperate circumstances far from home.

Fiction writers can go their entire careers and not pen a novel as powerful as this debut work by Marlantes. At 566 pages, plus a 31-page Appendix that's a "Glossary of Weapons, Technical Terms, Slang, and Jargon", MATTERHORN was of intimidating size before I read the opening sentence. Before long, I resented having to put the book down. This is a tribute to the Vietnam veteran and the Marine Corps, and may be one of the most vivid and compelling literary renderings you'll read all year. And you will, or should, appreciate even more the young Americans in harm's way in the country's contemporary overseas conflicts.
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50 of 53 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Karl Marlantes - A terrible journey through the dark heart of the Vietnam war, 28 July 2010
By 
Red on Black - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Matterhorn (Hardcover)
This is a book that can cause obsession since having devoted nearly every waking hour of the past week to reading this gripping tale it haunts you long after you turn the last page. Let me stress however that it was time well spent and it pales in comparison to the massive investment of passion, memory and catharsis that eventually took Vietnam War veteran Karl Marlantes some 35 years to write this great book. It is based on the Vietnamese conflict with its title drawn from the codename for a remote, mountainous military outpost which was a "firebase" constructed by Marines, near the demilitarised zone (DMZ) separating North and South Vietnam and near Laos. The basic story revolves around the fact that having invested huge energy into taking this mountainous base the marines are firstly ordered to abandon it and then bafflingly retake it shortly after.

This short description should not hide the fact that "Matterhorn" is a book of brazen ambition and sometimes difficult complexity. Marlantes narrative is relentless and punishing, not least in its description of collective mass of bugs, leeches and bites which have you almost itching as the marines "hump" through the impenetrable Vietnamese jungle with its larger and more dangerous horror of fierce tigers. I recently reviewed Gene Sledge's great non fiction work on the pacific war "With the old Breed" which is a harrowing and mind-numbingly vivid description of the combat zone. Reading "Matterhorn" I was struck how Marlantes, a decorated former Marine, draws on his own front line experience of Vietnam to construct its near fictional equivalent.

The story play outs viewed through the lens of a young (21 years old) second lieutenant, Waino Mellas, who like Charlie Sheen's character in the film "Platoon" joins the Marines with a bundle of motives but mostly confused notions of patriotism which are blown apart by the military debacle that he walks into. "So what's new" you ask, since thwarted idealism and steady military disillusion are the basic template of a vast number of war novels? The answer to this question is that the book does indeed follow some classical tenets of the war novel. But in addition what "Matterhorn" does is take this and mould it into something bigger and bolder not least when brilliantly tackling the sheer self serving callousness of rear echelon officer politics with their "strategic career choices" or the rampant omnipresent racism which pervaded this conflict whether between the black and white "grunts" or the visceral hatred of the NVA (North Vietnamese Army). Marlantes makes a point however of not preaching and recognising that in war "good" and "evil" are shifting sands and that survival is the only imperative, as Private Joker stated in Kubrick's Full Metal Jacket "the dead know only one thing: it is better to be alive".

There are times in the first part of this book where you do feel overwhelmed by huge weight of military detail and minutia, relentless pre-combat tension and the sheer multitude of characters, but stick with it, since the pace and tension builds throughout. The role of the bitter and twisted alcoholic Lieutenant Colonel Simpson is a key factor, while the more experienced veteran a marine named Hawke is probably the most sympathetic portrayal in the book. The journey throughout the book for Mellas is the well travelled path from novice to veteran but the underpinning journey is about the cruel removal of hope epitomised by the following passage - "Mellas knew, in his rational mind, that if there was no afterlife, death was no different from sleep. But this cruel flood was not from his rational mind. It had none of the ephemerality of thought. It was as real as the mud he sat in. Thought was just more of the nothing that he had done all his life. The fact of his eventual death shook him like a terrier shaking a rat. He could only squeal in pain."

The book is full of insightful writing and throughout an anger boils underneath it. In one sense Matterhorn reveals Marlantes own blinkered and frustrated view of his experience and the novel does have some faults. Ever since Graham Greene penned the Quiet American some Vietnam novels have struggled to capture a picture which is often more vivid in fact. Indeed in this reviewers opinion the greatest Vietnam books are either pure history such as Karnow's political tome, or alternatively eye witness accounts like Herr's "Dispatches" or Mason's "Chickenhawk". What is special about "Matterhorn" is that Marlantes has written a fictional work to stand aside this great war literature and the combat scenes are brilliantly portrayed. Overall it is a vivid, troubling, wrenching and timeless book of a terrible journey. An unforgettable read.
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48 of 51 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars I fought in a different Vietnam War, 1 Aug 2011
This review is from: Matterhorn (Hardcover)
I read the novel primarily because I had served as an Army infantry lieutenant in Vietnam during 1967 and 1968. Generally I prefer to read non-fiction and have not read a novel of the Vietnam War since Tim O'Brien's 1979 novel, Going After Cacciato. I found myself becoming immersed as the author was dealing with similar issues such as gaining the respect of his men upon his arrival. There were some errors to my mind, such as the cotton bandoliers that we wore diagonally across our chests held seven magazines -- not twenty, or claymores were not detonated by "pulling a cord," but rather by squeezing a handheld electrical detonator (clacker) when we were out on ambush, though if were inside our company perimeter at night we would simply rig our claymores to trip wires (before inserting the blasting cap into the top of the mine); additionally, Dapsone was not used to ameliorate against jungle rot, but rather was taken in conjunction with Primaquine to mitigate against Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Still I feel that Marlantes truthfully depicted the youth of the Marines in his dialogues, who for the most part were nineteen and twenty years of age. Marlantes was awarded the Navy Cross, which earns my respect. Up in the Central Highlands of Vietnam where I served until September 1968 I did not observe any racial problems out in the bush, and the majority of the soldiers in my platoon were blacks. Morale in the Army up through 1968 was actually quite high. Marlantes is describing the war during 1969, a time when morale had begun to plummet after the introduction of Nixon's "Vietnamization" Plan, as soldiers no longer wanted to be the last man killed in a war from which our political leaders intended to disengage. I fought in a different war, up in the Highlands, through 1968, the bloodiest year of the entire war, we soldiers out in the bush on our search and destroy missions still believed. We sincerely believed we were fighting the good fight and beating back the communist onslaught, and that our comrades had not died in vain. To my mind Marlantes accurately portrayed the Marine experience up along the DMZ. I'm pleased that Vietnam Vets are continuing to tell their stories, each of which adds another layer of understanding for students of history -- after the Veterans are gone.

A. T. Lawrence, author of Crucible Vietnam
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Move over, Tim O'Brien..., 16 Mar 2011
By 
John P. Jones III (Albuquerque, NM, USA) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Matterhorn (Hardcover)
...well, not too far. The "gestation period" might have taken awhile, like 40 years, no doubt to get it just right, and Karl Marlantes did. The quintessential Vietnam War novel has finally been born.

"There it is." The classic Vietnam expression uttered when the essential truth has been stated. All too appropriate for this novel, that never mentions Saigon. The machinations of the politicos are conveyed only as a distant abstraction. The action is shorn of all reporters whose vision was all too often refracted by, er, ah, "editorial concerns." The novel covers a two month period, in the early spring of 1969, during the monsoon season. The fighting occurs just south of an imaginary line once drawn in Geneva, to denote a temporary boundary of two years duration, until "free elections" were held to reunite the two sections of the country. Those often touted elections were never held, since the "wrong guy" would have won. And so two countries were created, at least in the West. Some of the fiercest fighting occurred in this area, around a classic misnomer, the "Demilitarized Zone," in the heart of the Annamite Cordillera where even the Vietnamese would not live: too high, too cold, too infertile and too much of the very bad malaria, the kind that felled Parker. And now the "is" was, save for the few who still carry the memories of those impossibly remote jungle valleys with them. Marlantes faithfully retained those memories, transforming them into a compelling story, for the many who were not there.

Marlantes' novel includes a few vital aides, for the few, as well as the many. There are a couple of appropriate maps, a "chain of command," with the names of the principal characters, and an excellent appendix which covers the specialized military terms, the lingo and slang unique to the war, as well as a succinct description of the weaponry used. Matterhorn was the designated American name of a 5,000 ft plus hill, in the extreme northwest corner of what was once South Vietnam. From there, on a clear, non-monsoon day, views into North Vietnam and Laos were possible. The story is, no doubt, thinly autobiographical, told through the eyes of a new `butter bar" lieutenant, Mellas. This is a novel about the Marines, and thus the war experience is much more intense than that which occurred even to most Army units in combat. Much more is, and has been demanded, of what is largely volunteers, with their famous esprit de corps, as it were, including that extra month, the 13th. Nothing underscored the intensity of the combat experience like the fact that when the novel is finished, Mellas still has 11 months left in Vietnam!

Marlantes writes well, in many ways it is a "page-turner"; but for approximately the first 200 pages there is virtually no combat. The author does pull the reader in, with the leeches. It is a dramatic beginning, since the monsoons negated the air power, and helicopter evacuation advantage of the Americans. There were the "docs" who felt overwhelmed by the task at hand, their limited resources and knowledge, yet managed despite the odds. The author develops a sufficient number of characters, of all the ranks, setting the stage for the later combat scenes. And when those scenes finally come, the relentless small unit combat, man to man, what was depicted was a small, but very real minority of the actual fighting in Vietnam, which all too often relied on massive firepower on the one side, and hit and run attacks on the other, in which one rarely saw "the enemy." The small unit infantry tactics, taught on the bases that churned out the officers, are made understandable for those who were never in the military.

So many aspects of the war that were unique to the Vietnam conflict were incorporated in this novel, and depicted with the utmost authenticity. A major sub-theme was the relationship between Black and White marines, as the former were influenced by the heady days of the Civil Rights movement. Another aspect was the "fragging" of the officers, and when it is an officer who is doing it, well, it underscores in bold the madness, and disconnection of the officer cast from the men, and what was being asked of them. There were a few, painfully real American infantry assaults on fortified hills, like "Hamburger Hill," in the A Shau valley, which occurred about four months after the events depicted in this novel. A hill taken at a very high cost in lives, only to be immediately given back to the North Vietnamese. Is it any wonder that more than a few grenades were rolled under some cots? There was the obsession with kill ratios, and although Marlantes does not attribute it, the 10:1 kill ratio thought necessary to win was derived from the British campaign in Malaya. The author has a brilliant passage when, just a maybe "probable" kill is escalated to 10 confirmed KIA's by the time it reaches Saigon. This novel is a real "outlier" for the Vietnam War; there are not "Susie Wongs." There are no Vietnamese women at all! But the author does have a brilliant scene with a "round eye," that portrayed the ache on the one side, and the impossible situation for the woman on the other with searing intensity. Even the "minor notes" of the novel were hit true: the accusation that Mellas might have been "slumming," that he had a choice of not joining the Marines, unlike the ones he was making fun of. Another: Every unit had a "numby," and they knew it, but they so desperately wanted the approbation of their "buddies," not to mention their father who had died in the Korean War, and so they took one too many chances. More than one tear in the eye.

Quibbles? In all these meticulously recalled or always lived memories, yes, there are those intervening 40 years. The 24th Marines were never at Belleau Woods (p 540)! And surely the Marines gave up their shiny metal officer bars around 1966, when the Army did, to be replaced by camouflaged black cloth. As for those sometimes sought medals for bravery, at least the Army was handing out Bronze Stars as though they were chloroquine primaquine anti-malaria pills.

I spent the same two months in Vietnam, the middle part of my "tour," in the same Annamite Cordillera, further south, in the Central Highlands. And I once fought, at night, to keep someone's temperature under that magic 104 degree level, awaiting the dawn, and medevac. The same war? No, radically different. I was in a tank unit, and although we might not have eaten well, we never missed a meal. During my orientation to the 4th Infantry Division, in September, 1968, the commanding general (who never got fragged!) said there will be no assaults on hills and fortified bunkers in his division. If stiff opposition were met, the units were to pull back, and let the artillery and the Air Force do its job. In the madness of war, all too sensible.

There were parts of Harper Perennial Modern Classics - The Naked and the Dead that were brilliant, but I've always had a problem with Norman Mailer, and his calculating choice as to which front in the Second World War would produce the better novel. Marlantes novel is much better, much more authentic and comprehensive. There is no sense of "calculation" in the author's motives; one senses that the story simply had to be finally told, and he did it so well. 5-stars, plus.

(Note: Review first published at Amazon, USA, on April 19, 2010)
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant, but don't bother if you don't like Vietnam or military books, 5 July 2011
This review is from: Matterhorn (Paperback)
I wasn't expecting much of this book and didn't really read other reviews as most seemed too long and gushing, and didn't think it would surpass the 13th Valley or Fields of Fire. I was wrong. This is a great novel.

The length of time it has taken to write has allowed the story to mature, there is no immediate axe to grind like so many early books. In some ways you might say that the author doesn't have a story to tell or he would have already, but actually this is a great piece of writing. He captures the various ranks with empathy and tells the story from all their motivations flawlessly.

Too many times I was transported back to the jungle and back to the soldiering environment and I am sure that anyone who has experience of either would have felt it. His battle scenes are as good as any I have read and he manages to compress his writing of them into short blurs that leave you at the end knowing what has happened, but not quite how you got there.

With 300 pages to go I wanted to crawl into a hole and finish the book undisturbed. A thrilling read.

My only proviso - if you don't like military or vietnam books don't start with this one, there are easier (not as detailed) and shorter books out there that would ease you into the genre.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Gripping stuff but....., 18 Aug 2010
This review is from: Matterhorn (Hardcover)
Brilliantly rendered images, putting you right there with the sharply drawn, sympathetic characters. Gripping at times. Well worth a read, though a tad drawn out and occasionally strays into adventure story mode and the final chapter or two is a bit odd...kind of like the author wasn't exactly sure how to finish it? So 4 stars not 5. For a real 5 star check out 'With the Old Breed' by Eugene Sledge.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Gripping, funny, terrifying, 28 May 2012
This review is from: Matterhorn (Hardcover)
I strongly recommend this book, it is a gripping, funny, terrifying book full of real empathy. If you are looking for something that has all the tub thumping bravado of a Chuck Norris film, you will be disappointed; Matterhorn is not about how great explosions are but is a study of how war can shape the lives and souls of men. Maybe that sounds too melodramatic, but this is a genuinely moving story about the individuals called to fight and their experiences of war's violence.

I am lucky in that I've never had to face the never ending fatigue and terrible fear of combat. I have never had to drag myself on for hour after pointless hour, worrying that at any moment forces outside of my control will suddenly and with great violence end my life in a flurry of bullets and blood. Karl Marlantes has and his experience as a front line US Marine in Vietnam forms the bones, muscle and heart of this novel.

Although this is a work of fiction, it feels real. It feels as if every mile of dark jungle, every panic stricken moment under fire actually happened. There are small details, such as the dark purple staining on the soldiers' lips from the fruit flavours that they add to the water in their canteens and the vile concoctions that they create by mixing all of their rations together (with generous lashings of Tabasco sauce), that speak of personal experience, rather than clever research.

In an interview with the Guardian newspaper, Marlantes explains that this novel sprang from his desire to explain something of the experience of the Vietnam war, away from the grand strategic overviews of history or the visual orgy of lights and iconography of something like Apocalypse Now, which have come to define our view of the Vietnam war. His novel does not come with a Jimi Hendrix sound track and a Colonel Kurtz figure somewhere up the river. Instead, the story looks at the rather personal conflicts that combat places on a group of men.

Tasked with preparing a mountain, codenamed Matterhorn, to be an artillery firing base, the Marines of Bravo Company must fight against the impossibility of staging patrols in the dense, unforgiving jungle, for what would appear to be a pointless exercise. At the whim of officers whose distance from the jungle and their own careerist agendas, the Marines are forced to act on ridiculous orders - covering front line foxholes to protect them from nonexistent artillery, when it means obscuring sight lines for a more likely ground assault; marching men without food or water over mountainous terrain towards meaningless, arbitrary objectives.

It would have been easy for Marlantes to portray the commanding officers as 'bad' or incompetent men. However, the novel carefully and patiently examines each character's motives and decisions. Ultimately, the reader has to ask themselves whether they would have made any wiser decisions once the god-like objectivity of their view was removed. For instance, Simpson, the commanding officer maybe a petty, alcoholic but as one of the characters points out, heavy drinking isn't unknown in the Marine Corps. Plus, Simpson's vivid memories of the Korean war mean that he is no stranger to the hardships of frontline combat.

Away from the jungle, in base camp, the company is riven with racial divides. This was the time of the civil rights movement, and the black marines are well aware and very sensitive to their status as a lower class than the white soldiers. It is this conflict that forms the sad conclusion to the novel, rather than the bloody battle to retake the hill. Whatever bonds battle forges, they cannot be as strong as the divisions and resentments that 'The Real World' has forced between these men.

Vietnam has its stereotypes, informed by the many films that have covered Vietnam, and these stereotypes exist here, but with a striking realism that stops them being the sorts of symbols we expect to see in order to tick them off our Vietnam War Score Card, and instead become living, breathing aspects of the lives of 'real' people. In his Guardian interview, Marlantes says of his characters "Now, with maturity and distance, I had come to love them all" and that is something that the reader takes away as well.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Outstanding, 15 Mar 2012
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This review is from: Matterhorn (Paperback)
One of the most compelling books i have ever read, not just as a war novel but as a story full stop. I gave this a go based on a recommendation, though i don't really have that much interest in the Vietnam war itself. I must admit that at first I was a little impatient with the lack of real action, the number of characters you had to follow and what seemed like bits of unnecessary dialogue and background descriptions that i thought would make the whole story drag. However you soon come to realize that it is all done for a purpose, setting the scene for a tragic tale in a tragic war that the book brilliantly portrays as brutal and pointless in equal measure.

For those that don't know, this is somewhat of a 'biographical novel' with the lead character Mellas closely resembling the author Karl Marlantes, who himself did time as an officer in Vietnam. What is more impressive still is that this story took some 35 years for him to write. Marlantes, like Mellas, really has displayed a will to never give up. And i'm glad he has, because this novel is excellent.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Grapes of Wrath with grenades, 29 Dec 2011
This review is from: Matterhorn (Paperback)
Helicopters emerging out of the mist? Yes please. This book did not disappoint (unlike the lazy pilots who were refusing to fly because of visibility problems whilst their comrades got to grips with 24/7 mortar fire, hemmed in by the North Vietnamese.)

At times a slow and human account of life in the marine corps which develops into an exploration of the main character's psyche - from ambition to a realisation of his limitations, to staring at the sides of a trench with his best bud's entrails sliding down his cheeks (thing's get quite low), to hero to nobody.

Then cut to mission control where the decisions are being taken for barely strategic reasons, moreso to satisfy the media back in ol' mississippi; and the reader gets a privileged perspective on the needless and illogical backdrop to it all. How accurate this all is I'm unsure as I'm not in the know, but it poses some deep and dark questions.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Faultless, 25 May 2011
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This review is from: Matterhorn (Hardcover)
After getting thoroughly bored of "war" novels and their copycat plots, I bought this with some trepidation - no need to worry, this is one of the best novels I have ever read. Karl Marlantes captures the feel of the Vietnam War is ways no one else has ever achieved - you'll identify with the characters, you'll feel their fear, you'll share their despair.

Stunning.
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