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20 of 20 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good Tidings They Bring
Should more bands release albums that rhyme with their band name? Probably not, but Wolf People are not most bands. For a start, how many other current English psych-rock bands of note are there? With few to no local contemporaries, it is fair to say that Wolf People look to their predecessors for guidance.

Meandering interludes and all, their dusty odds and...
Published on 11 Oct. 2010 by Gannon

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Great Music, poor sound.....a vinyl review
I already have this album on CD and really like it, I won't go further with that because others have said it all, my disappointment is the poor quality of sound with the vinyl. I only bought the vinyl because I thought this music must sound better that way, the cd sounds compressed and lacks depth so with great expectation I played the vinyl only to find they seem to...
Published on 20 July 2013 by Photoman


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20 of 20 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good Tidings They Bring, 11 Oct. 2010
By 
Gannon (Manchester, England) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Steeple (Audio CD)
Should more bands release albums that rhyme with their band name? Probably not, but Wolf People are not most bands. For a start, how many other current English psych-rock bands of note are there? With few to no local contemporaries, it is fair to say that Wolf People look to their predecessors for guidance.

Meandering interludes and all, their dusty odds and sods collection Tidings, which saw light earlier this year, caught the ear. So, naturally, a fully focused effort largely recorded in a C17th barn in Wales ups the ante somewhat. What remains constant however is that the band seem still not to have heard a record made since the mid `70s, but they have nevertheless been delving deeper into forgotten record boxes marked pastoral folk since Tidings was cobbled together.

Imagine a fog-covered vale, church spire standing resolute under autumn moonlight - that's half of Steeple. The other half hand-whisks classic Jack Bruce-era Cream into the equation, sprinkles in some of Hendrix's riffs and the subsequent tight jam recalls the recent efforts of kindred spirits Arbouretum as a result. Album highlight "One By One From Dorney Reach" pulls a classic sounding Bond theme tune out of the bag, only it's one envisaged by Jimmy Page in full chug mode. Consequently, it's genuinely excellent no matter the decade it beams in from.

Frontman Jack Sharp's thin, dreamy vocal isn't the most complimentary, yet it sets the band's work apart. You know that despite the ready influences you are listening to Wolf People, and it is thanks to Sharp who smoothes his words between indulgent instrumentals, over fearless classic rock passages and into finales full of feedback.

It doesn't all work though, it must be said. For example, the Hendrix / Bullitt soundtrack mélange "Tiny Circle" is too heavy on the flute in its laboured, flighty 60s groove for these ears, but the solid opener "Silbury Sands" gets the elusive balance spot on, as do the immaculate riffs and harmonies of "Painted Cross". The two-part closer "Banks of Sweet Dundee" is equally notable, focusing Steeple like stepping out into a chilly morning does. It's real outdoorsy psych-folk stuff: cool and dewy. Together, late on, these tracks give Steeple real backbone and, dare I say it, identity.

In a world where punk never happened, Wolf People play on where their hirsute heroes left off, and most bands couldn't pull that off credibly. But then Wolf People are not most bands - they're a condensing of some of the very best ones.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Retro-rock rave, 4 Oct. 2011
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This review is from: Steeple (Audio CD)
Clearly these guys have been nicking their dads' Wishbone Ash albums. In places the resemblance of the vocalist to Martin Turner's folk-tinged vocals is spooky (notably on tracks such as "Banks of Sweet Dundee"). Also the guitarists seems to have picked up many of their licks from the Ted Turner Guitar Tutor book. Those of us old enough to have a familiarity with 70s rock will find much that is recognisable here - echoes of much apart from the 'Ash' - Edgar Broughton Band, Stray, Quintessence and so on. The stylistic tics include much use of cowbell, and twin guitar soloing. However, I can not criticise this as derivative - there's very little anywhere that is 100% original. They have produced for a first outing a hugely impressive and enjoyable slice of retro-rock. My favourite track of all is the fantastic "Castle Keep". If I had not known, I could easily have believed this had been recorded in the early 70s. I wish the band every success with this album - it's great to have a young band bring a fresh approach to this genre - I hope that they attract a younger audience also - not just the more mature fan such as myself.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Back to what music great in the first place, 7 Jan. 2011
This review is from: Steeple (Audio CD)
This album is an astoninshingly good out of the blue release for a brand new band in a music 'scene' full of hairstyle-over-substance. The fractured and accessible like never before nature of today's music business seems to mean that whilst a few bands with relentless try-hard hooks and synth riffs are swept up for an album or two by huge labels, bands like Wolf People can equally have a say and find the fans still hanging on for something a little more honest.
If rock music is an evolved folk blended with electric blues, Wolf People are rock music through and through. If you feel the 80s production sheen permanently damaged the honesty of the songs you hear from the most indie of bands, then buy this record and feel your faith in the music business and in English bands restored.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Retro sound for today!, 8 Nov. 2010
By 
Westy "Two Bells" (Milton Keynes England) - See all my reviews
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This band has amazingly blended the sound of early seventies pastoral sounds(hints of Tull, with a splash of early Fleetwood Mac) and mixed in some strange Groundhogs chord progressions, while all the time hinting at a bit of Sabbath thud and cosmic fabulousness!If this mixture seems a bit too rich for your taste buds, try it,you will come back for second helpings--then pudding AND cheese and biscuits!!Retro sounds done right.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Stick with it and you will be rewarded, 21 Sept. 2011
By 
Stephen Bate (Preston, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Steeple (Audio CD)
So glad i took a chance on this as it really is a fantastic album. Repeat listens just seem to keep on giving but amazingly (to me) I almost gave up on it on the first couple of plays as being nothing special but i stuck with it and now it just gets better with each listen. Yes, it has a familliar 60s/70s sound but it's done so well. I can't quite put my finger on it but it feels "classy". I wish more people would look outside the mainstream and give some attention to bands like these. I could talk to friends about this album till I'm blue in the face but I know they'd stick with the radio friendly "rock" bands. There's so much good music around (Graveyard and Asteroid being two of my favourites) that goes unnoticed and it's a damn shame. Hope these guys get the success they deserve.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Cry Wolf, AWOOOOOOOOHHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!!!!!!!, 29 Mar. 2013
By 
Pesto Fingeration (Chez Vegas, Englandland) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Steeple (Audio CD)
Do you like Church towers surmounted by big pointy pinnacles?
Do you like Wolves?
Do you like People? (I don't)
Do you like the past?
Do you like Flutes?
DO you like Beards?
Do you like RETRO???????

Well if you do, then this is as RETRO as it gets. Probably. Stick a load of proto-METAL bands, Fairport Convention, Jethro Tull, Late 60s psychedelic bands and corduroy trousers into a cement mixer and let it stir for a couple of years. Bung in a couple of flayed dog skins, stir a bit more and out will come Wolf People.

Buy with confidence.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Lupine Howls from mighty babys...., 25 July 2011
By 
S. Rogan "Shaun" (London England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Steeple (Audio CD)
I fell upon the work of Bedford combo Wolf People totally by accident at this years Primaverasound Festival in Spain (May 2011). I was drawn to their appearance on the ATP Stage by the sound of duelling guitars (on what i now know to be opening track on this lp, "Silbury Sands") and 30 minutes later had discovered one of my favourite new bands. Wolf People have distilled some of the best things about late 60's folk (psych) rock and rebooted it for the present. "Steeple" is a great record, chock full of memorable tunes and tastefully wild guitar playing. If Richard Thompson had been in Mighty Baby or High Tide then they may have sounded something like this. Wolf People mean it and deserve your ears. Buy now, put your razors in the bin and make plans for an autumn stalking Box Hill at dusk.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great First Album!, 28 Feb. 2013
This review is from: Steeple (Audio CD)
Stumbled upon Wolf People & this album by chance soon after it was first released. VERY glad I did!

They have a folk-rock-psychedelic type sound that would not be out of place in the late 60s or early 70s.

My particular favourites are Silbury Sands & Morning Born, absolutely love these.

If the above genres sounds interesting to you, then I would definitely recommend that you buy this album.

Real music like this deserves to be supported in my opinion, as opposed to the rubbish that the mainstream "music" industry peddles out these days.

I read in an interview with the band (who are releasing a new album in April, yay!), that they all work full-time jobs to support themselves. Hopefully enough people will buy their music so that they can devote more time to it, as it would be a shame if such talent & creativity were wasted!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Great Music, poor sound.....a vinyl review, 20 July 2013
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This review is from: Steeple [VINYL] (Vinyl)
I already have this album on CD and really like it, I won't go further with that because others have said it all, my disappointment is the poor quality of sound with the vinyl. I only bought the vinyl because I thought this music must sound better that way, the cd sounds compressed and lacks depth so with great expectation I played the vinyl only to find they seem to have used the same digital master for the vinyl. Many bands/labels have seen the light and remastered for vinyl, Jack White amongst many who produce fantastic sounding LP's.

Unfortunately the above wasn't helped by a rather average pressing which had a lot of surface noise, because of this I returned the LP to Amazon who were great and refunded immediately. The Amazon service on LP's is very good and gives me the confidence to buy knowing that returns are not a problem.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 1973, 23 Jun. 2011
This review is from: Steeple (Audio CD)
It's 1973, but in a really good way. Jethro Tull meets Ten Years After and a less commercial Zeppelin. Don't know who they are and don't really care. Hope these boys make something just as invigorating in the future.
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Steeple
Steeple by Wolf People (Audio CD - 2010)
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