Customer Reviews


78 Reviews
5 star:
 (31)
4 star:
 (20)
3 star:
 (10)
2 star:
 (8)
1 star:
 (9)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Remarkable and bruising barrage
As anyone who has ever been more involved in music that sniping from the sidelines will know it takes a certain amount of courage to walk up to the mic stand alone, whether you layer the result in effects or not. But then Neil Young, no matter what else you may think of him, has always been an artist unafraid to take risks. Whether you think of him yelling at the...
Published on 30 Jan. 2012 by sonicabuse

versus
52 of 57 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars .
So, some people have given this 5 stars. Then, other people who don't like this record so much, think that all the people who've given it 5 stars are "Neil Young devotees" who give him 5 stars regardless of the quality of the music. Is it not possible that some people do think this deserves 5 stars?

Let me tell you; I'm a Neil Young devotee. But that doesn't...
Published on 19 Oct. 2010 by Neil


‹ Previous | 1 28 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Remarkable and bruising barrage, 30 Jan. 2012
This review is from: Le Noise (Audio CD)
As anyone who has ever been more involved in music that sniping from the sidelines will know it takes a certain amount of courage to walk up to the mic stand alone, whether you layer the result in effects or not. But then Neil Young, no matter what else you may think of him, has always been an artist unafraid to take risks. Whether you think of him yelling at the tree-hugging hippies of the seventies desperately trying to galvanize them into action, scoring the oddball Jim Jamarsch movie `dead man' almost entirely with feedback and atmospherics, employing Pearl Jam as the world's most well-known backing band or going totally off the rails for the Geffen-contract-wrecking `Trans', the man has been nothing if not delightfully entertaining over his lengthy career even while only the most die-hard fan would try to claim that all his works are worthy of his name.

However, despite what the critics might have you believe, the last decade was certainly a strong one for Neil. `Chrome Dreams II' (a sequel to an album that was never made), `Living with War', `Greendale' and `road rock Vol 1' (a live album) were all hugely enjoyable while `Silver and Gold' and `prairie wind' were strong acoustic outings that lacked the punch of `Freedom' but which still had their moments of classic Young beauty. `Le Noise' thus closes out the decade in fine style and sees Neil doing what he does best, namely confounding his fans (and his detractors) expectations to do things his way and it works all too well.

At 39 minutes `Le noise' is a brief affair, but given the densely sounds contained within that's probably a good thing. On offer are eight tracks of varying vintage (much like `Chrome dreams II'. Young has once again plundered his unreleased back catalogue for inspiration) that rattle out of the speakers with a raw energy that few singer/songwriters could match. Opening gambit `walk with me' is a prime example. Branded by one critic as `unlistenable' it swells out of a miasma of pure Young guitar - that same wonderful tone that set hairs on the back of the neck a-tingling on `ordinary people' - before Young's feline howl breaks the static and the electric sparks flying are unmistakable; this is Young in top, confrontational form and the fact that this is just one man and a guitar is all too easily forgotten thanks to clever use of effects and Young's electric, attention grabbing performance. His guitar howls, roars and spits while the man himself sings better than ever, perhaps aware that shorn of a backing band he can't afford to slack off on the vocal front. As the track fades off into a wall of ear-drum damaging feedback it's hard not to rejoice that the Neil Young who doused listeners in thirty minutes of feedback with `Arc' is standing front and centre with a malicious grin on his face and a glint in his eye. And that's only the first track. `Sign of love' is rather more traditional in outlook, recalling the wounded howl of `Tonight's the night' via the grizzled distortion of `Sleeps with angels' and once again you're left in awe that one man can make so much noise. `Someone gonna rescue you' is another gem with an insistent melody and the effects rack of famed producer Daniel Lanois allowing Young's guitar to sound somewhere between an instrument of raging rock and a pump organ allowing a rhythmic sensibility to seep in despite the complete absence of percussion of any kind.

Having scared off its detractors with a consistent barrage of distorted guitar the album shifts gear to the acoustic beauty of `Love and war' which stands as a lament that seems to be largely about Young's own career as a musician and political commentator. It's one of his finest works both emotionally and musically and in one song he captures everything that he wanted to say on the `living with war' album in a truly elegant five and a half minutes. "Angry world" underlines its theme with one of the heaviest riffs Young has ever written while his voice echoes around the spaces where a band would normally be. The effect is slightly unsettling, while the droning feedback that closes the song is pure Sonic Youth - a notion that Young would undoubtedly take as a compliment. `Hitchhiker' is better still - a wonderful track that recalls the electric lament of `hey hey, my my (into the black) with a chorus that rages with a white hot intensity while Young revisits the piles of drugs that have popped up over the course of his lengthy career.

A second acoustic track `Peaceville valley Boulevard' offers up another glimpse of the beauty that Neil Young is so capable of delivering and here, standing in contrast to some of his noisiest material in an age, it shines all the brighter. Beautifully played and utterly naked, it can be heavy going but rewarding nonetheless and a true testament to the man's skill. Final track `Rumbling' is a real oddity with all sorts of strange effects building the introduction before a guitar that is distorted to the point of destroying the speaker-cone slithers out and Neil Young's most self-lacerating lyric cries out from the darkness "when will I learn how to give back?"It's a fitting end to an album that is arguably one of Neil's most human endeavours and despite the Pink Floyd bothering array of effects used to mask the emotional undercurrent racing through this release the overwhelming feeling is that you've spent forty minutes in the company of the real Neil Young - torn by self doubt and yet propped up by a belief in his music and his politics, born of a desire to rock and yet fragile and vulnerable -all those aspects can be found here on this challenging and starkly beautiful release.

Ultimately this will not attract newcomers to Neil Young's oeuvre - there are too many other records better suited to that task and `Le noise' is a dense, nervy piece. However, for fans who have stuck by Neil over the years this is a triumphant record that sees the man's most human side laid bare even while his trusty guitar rages with a fire and intensity that the decade's other fine releases didn't quite succeed in matching. It's difficult - for sure, but then who ever said great art had to be easy? A triumph for an artist who consistently divides opinion.

Original Review At [...]
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


67 of 73 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Sweet Hitchhiker, 27 Sept. 2010
By 
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Le Noise (Audio CD)
Le Noise is an album that Neil Young needed to make. Just when it seemed like the ornery old cowpoke may have said all he had to say, along come 38 minutes and 1 second of sonic assault that remind us why his career has lasted over 40 years, and why he still matters.

Daniel Lanois's production signature is far less evident that might have been expected (or feared), but whatever his role in the delivery of this album, his touch has been just enough to breathe new life into Young's 'Old Black'. Songs like 'Love And War' with its echoes of 'Eldorado' from 1989's Freedom, 'Sign Of Love' and 'Angry World' are the best things that he has written since.... well, since some of the previous best things he has written. There is no band accompaniment; just Young spitting brooding and distorted soundscapes from his electric guitar. Sometimes, this sounds almost like the precursor to a full-on band sound that is about to rush in and thrash a song in true Crazy Horse style, but the restraint is in many ways the album's strength. Here is something entirely familiar, but new.

Most welcome of all is one of a number of 'Holy Grail' songs from Neil Young's archives, 'Hitchhiker', which finally appears on an album 36 years after it first surfaced. Unlike 'Ordinary People' on Chrome Dreams II, 'Hitchhiker' is surrounded by a set of songs that are almost of equal stature. It blends in beautifully with the album's mood, a journey through the past of Young's back pages in the spirit of 'Don't Be Denied', or even 'Helpless'. There is relief in the beautiful 'Love And War' and 'Peaceful Valley Boulevard'. These electric and acoustic bedfellows recall one of Young's previous career highs, the glorious Rust Never Sleeps whose sonic assault saw Young tipping his hat to punk. 32 years later, Le Noise is an album that will sit high up in the canon as one of the best things he has done.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


52 of 57 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars ., 19 Oct. 2010
This review is from: Le Noise (Audio CD)
So, some people have given this 5 stars. Then, other people who don't like this record so much, think that all the people who've given it 5 stars are "Neil Young devotees" who give him 5 stars regardless of the quality of the music. Is it not possible that some people do think this deserves 5 stars?

Let me tell you; I'm a Neil Young devotee. But that doesn't mean I think this is a 5 star record. I don't. I too read some of the hype about this record before it's release, claiming it was an instant classic, and that this was Neil's best writing since the 70s. I don't think it is. I'm not disappointed though. But you know; I don't like all Neil's albums. I would give quite a few of them 5 stars, but I bet they aren't the same records every other "Neil Young devotee" or casual Neil Young fan would give 5 stars to. So let's just dispense with all the sniping at people who enjoy certain records more than you do. Can we? Unless those people are actually employed by the record company to get a few good reviews on Amazon...

So that's pretty much all I have to say that hasn't been said already. I agree with most that "Love and War" and "Peaceful Valley Boulevard" are the best songs, and that they are of a high enough quality on their own right. Elsewhere, I don't really think this is representative of the great guitar playing that Neil is capable of, but to me it's obvious that he hasn't gone for virtuosity this time. The songs are low-key and simple - that's just the kind of record he's decided to make. I actually like the idea of it more than I like the execution. I'm certainly not a fan of Lanois. All he seems to have done here is make the guitar sound like Metallica, and added tons of delay to Neil's vocal. It just doesn't sit well with me.

In summary, I don't like Le Noise too much, but I'll defend Neil's right to make it. I certainly don't feel like he's exploiting me, and I don't feel like I've wasted my money. He's creating, trying something a bit different, and it's not all that successful for me. It obviously is for others, though.

Should you buy it? I don't know. You're not going to know whether you like it until you hear it...
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


49 of 58 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Neil Young - Come on feel "Le Noise", 27 Sept. 2010
By 
Red on Black - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Le Noise (Audio CD)
The image of Young contained in the video for "Walk with me" is one which I recall and treasure from seeing the man live in concert four times (his Finsbury Park concert in 1993 backed by Booker T and the MGs remains one of the greatest ever). It conjures up the vision of a contrary and craggy grizzly bear, one of "Hell's geriatrics" still growing old disgracefully and daring everyone else to "keep up". Rumours have spread from Young's recent "Twisted Road" tour of the North America that the raw power of his new material was up there with his best. Do all you can to check out the internet for footage of these performances or the videos to fully appreciate his continuing brilliance as a live artist and equally the context for this album.

It would be wonderful to report that "Le Noise" is a game changing masterpiece along the lines of "On the beach" or "Rust never sleeps" but it's not. It is however Young's best album since "Sleeps with Angels" and is testimony to his enduring relevance that any new album releases by the great man excite a level of passion, controversy and debate primarily because we care and he matters. Young has brought in the renown producer Daniel Lanois who previously performed wonders with Dylan's 80s masterpiece "Time out of Mind". The Lanois effect is the sonic equivalent of a band in his own right and while "Le noise" is a Neil Young solo album, six of the eight songs are given the angry "folk metal" treatment with Young's huge Gretch White Falcon howling, chugging, blazing and burning its way through soundscapes drenched in slabs of echo and reverb which conjure wicked tricks through your speakers and amplifiers.

You will Amazon listener need to stick with this one (I really did not like a large part of it for the first five plays) since initially you will find this album superficially devoid of light and shade with the immediate exception of the two acoustic songs "Love and War" and "Peaceful valley boulevard". The former is a gorgeous/gentle summation of Young's passions throughout his long song writing career and once more revisits his life long concerns of anti war messages but this time viewed through the lens of the families involved. Peacefully Valley is a seven minute plus atmospheric classic and the best song on the album which starts off addressing the near extinction of the Bison on the American plains and turns into a wonderful song montage of the history of the West. Its themes essentially reprise those of Zuma's "Cortez the Killer" and transpose them to Kansas and California until they are brought up to date with Young's views on climate change.

In terms of this review that was the easy part. The six electric are songs alternatively more of a mixed assortment. Opener "Walk with me" includes the most destructive and emboldened guitar work this side of Jack White with Young literally spitting out "Walk with me" in the chorus and Lanois piling on the effects. The excellent "Sign of love" starts with a familiar sounding Young riff and could have happily fitted on "Ragged Glory" with full Crazy Horse backing. Yet the absence of a fully fledged rhythm section on all these songs does take some getting use to and as such during the mournful "Someone's gonna rescue you" there are times when you long for instrumental backdrop to be richer and more "coloured in".

The lyrics on "Angry World" which begins and ends with a vocal loop and a huge riff seem to this reviewer to be sloppy underpinned by the refrain "it's an Angry World but everything is gonna be alright" and laudable if obvious platitudes, its not a great song. "Hitchhiker" on the other hand is one of those old songs (1974?) that Young has "dusted down" for the right moment and it's a stunner. It details Young's drugs journey from hash, amphetamine, valium to cocaine and the immense toil it took. As he confesses "Then came paranoia/and it ran away with me/I couldn't sign my autograph/or appear on TV/or see or be seen". There it little doubt that performed live with Crazy Horse this will be of force nine gale intensity. Finally "Rumblin" is a slower and powerful eco electric blues song and a more reflective conclusion to the album standing as a counterpart to the earlier pyrotechnics.

"Le Noise" is overall an excellent record and is one of those Neil Young albums which is clearly intended to confront and provoke. His raison d'etre has always been to doggedly pursue one of rock music's most incredible musical journey's and to continually confound his fans with detours which both perplex but often delight. In dark days I sometimes listen to the line in "Hey Hey My My" namely "once you're gone, you can never come back" and imagine the time when artists like Young are no longer recording and who will step into their shoes? It is a question which sends ghostly shivers since "Le Noise" sees Neil Young still leading and redefining the revolution blues and it proves yet again that he is irreplaceable and without peer.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Curate's Egg, 15 Jun. 2012
This review is from: Le Noise (Audio CD)
As most people seem to agree, the best track on the album is probably Peaceful Valley Boulevard, one of the few acoustic tracks on Le Noise. Love and War and The Hitchhiker are pretty decent offerings, but on the whole I think it's one of Neil's more self-indulgant albums. I've pretty much got all of Mr Young's work and as most honest devotees will admit, they can veer from the sublime to the downright unlistenable. From my point of view, this is weirdly enough part of the appeal - always expect the unexpected! Le Noise isn't by any means in the unlistenable category, it's just it can sound a bit samey at times and definitely needs a backing band on the electric numbers. For me, electric guitar only really works within the context of a minimum of bass and drums, whereas acoustic work will happily sit on it's own and often benefits from a simple arrangement (i.e. I can't imagine Sugar Mountain other than with one man and his guitar). For me, Neil's best electric-based songs work best when they're more melodic in tone and less grungey (i.e. Like A Hurricane, Cortez The Killer, Down By The River etc). What I do admire about the veteran Canadian's output most though is he doesn't seem to mellow with age and still seems very capable of coming up with unexpectedly good melodies and lyrics, when his contempories struggle to produce new and exciting work. Being a huge fan of his acoustic work in particular, I'm hoping there's another one of those in the can for the future (Harvest, Comes A Times, Harvest Moon, Silver & Gold etc.). It would also be interesting for Neil to do a collaborative album with other artists. I just heard an unlikely combo of NY and Al Jardine on the Beach Boys guitarist's album, A Postcard From California, where Neil is singing co-lead vocals on one of the tracks - shouldn't work, but it does. So to sum up, not in the Neil Young top 10 albums by any means, but not a bad album either, thus the 3 stars.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Echoes of greatness, 21 Jan. 2012
By 
GlynLuke (York UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Le Noise (Audio CD)
More than any other artist, Neil Young`s albums deserve to be seen as one massive work-in-progress. Of course, such a view embraces a multitude of sins. With regard to Le Noise, I can`t go along with the `glass full` five-star optimists, nor can I accept that it`s as bad as the one-star naysayers say it is. Hey, it`s a Neil Young record. What do you expect - consistency, predictability, safety?
The first time I played this hermetic collaboration between NY and echo-loving Daniel Lanois (whose helping hand has been so effective on albums by Dylan, Peter Gabriel, Robbie Robertson, the Neville Brothers, not to mention his own masterpiece Acadie) my reaction was: `Blimey! I need to hear this on a stormy night with my pet coyote by my side and a stiff drink`. (The same might be said of Tonight`s The Night or Weld, for that matter.) It`s a short, to-the-point disc that takes no prisoners, or would like to think so. In fact, it`s a sometimes meandering, unimaginative affair, with Neil - usually a visceral, incisive guitarist - pulling his punches in many of his solos as well as on the songs` riffs. This is a shame, as there is a terrific album hidden in the over-produced, feedback-heavy gloop of Le Noise.
That`s the bad news. Others have mentioned the two acoustic songs, which indeed are rather splendid, as is the `Holy Grail` number, Hitchhiker. Funnily enough, the album seems to get better as it goes on, the opening couple of tracks being a bit of a disappointment. Overall, it really isn`t one of Neil`s best, and blame for that must be shared equally between NY and DN. One longs for a wailing, extended guitar solo or something a little more nutritious than what we are given here. But I shall play this occasionally - on stormy nights, whisky and coyote present and correct - and it will slot into NY`s string of records like a cantankerous, ornery
old relative into a fractious family gathering.
No, it ain`t that good, is it? But no, it ain`t that bad either.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


23 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars In a word - Immense......., 27 Sept. 2010
By 
Gary McCall (Chelmsfrod, Essex United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Le Noise (Audio CD)
And when i say immense i mean the sound that Neil releases from his guitar. This is how to control feedback and distortion so that it has both rhythm and melody. It's like having the rest of Crazy Horse fed through his six strings.

The production is superb with Neil's voice (sometimes via effects and loops) fitting perfectly to the noise around him. The two 'acoustic' songs provide respite, in particular Peaceful Valley Boulevard which is one of the best things he has written for years.

On first listen it is a bit overpowering but it rewards so much each time you come back. There is an element of Pearl Jam/Grunge and dare i say it Angry World, probably my favourite song, ends sounding like Radiohead with all of Lanois's effects. Even the album artwork fits the overall feeling you get from listening.

I pity other artists who could never release something like Le Noise for fear of being dropped by their fans or record company. But with a back catalogue like his he has earned the right to surprise both himself and us.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars More songs about Love and War..., 15 Oct. 2010
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Le Noise (Audio CD)
Having read a few press releases and reviews before my purchase, I was a bit wary of Le Noise, fearing that it would turn out to be either (a) another awkward, challenging release by Young (he tends to throw a spanner in the works every now and again ... remember Greendale anyone?) or (b) a Lanois-dominated over-production (Lanois seems to have done most of the talking in the interviews I have read about Le Noise). Thankfully, neither scenario is correct.

This album in many ways reflects Young's best work of the last two decades, with particular homage to elements of Freedom. The production is great - I genuinely can't think of a CD I've purchased where the guitar sounds better - and the songs grow stronger with every listen. Although far from easy listening at times, Young's electric guitar work is simply stunning and his trademark vocals hang over the often dense and menacing soundscape with beauty and a typical flare for underrated melody. Simply put, its an album that rewards close attention. I don't even notice the absence of a backing band, as every song on this (admittedly rather short) album is strong. The two acoustic numvers - 'Love and War' and 'Peaceful Valley Boulevard' - are, in many ways, the pins that hold the album together, with the former echoing the hispanic charm of 'Eldorado' and the latter sounding like a distant cousin of Young back-catologue epic 'Cortez the Killer,' or possibly 'Natural Beauty'. Elsewhere, the music is edgier, with 'Angry World' and 'Hitchhiker' my particular favourites. Nothing is ever straightforward with NY, of course, and there are times when the music appears on the brink of mediocrity (prevalent on a few recent releases such as 'Fork in the Road'), only to be immediately elevated by a wonderful lyric or a left-of-centre chord change. Its not always a comfortable ride (Young prefers to have at least two wheels in the ditch on any given musical journey) - lovers of Neil's music wouldn't want it any other way, however. My only sadness is that, given his age, there can't be too many more twists in the road ahead - which makes it more important to enjoy this album to the full.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Neil's strongest album for some time, 16 Oct. 2010
By 
This review is from: Le Noise (Audio CD)
The best Neil Young albums tend to be the `rocking' albums with Crazy Horse (Zuma, Rust Never Sleeps) or the acoustic, stripped down albums (After the Gold Rush, On the Beach etc). His new album is neither of these but sits apart as a curious beast. The album consists entirely of Neil Young and his guitar, accompanied by producer Daniel Lanois' effects. So no bass, no drums. And Neil's guitar is mostly plugged in.

On the electric songs his guitar sounds immense, though without any other instruments the effect is a little disorientating, until you get used to it. In actual fact a lot of the songs sound like they would transfer well on to an acoustic guitar. Although it's the strongest collection of songs for some time from Neil Young, he doesn't frontload the album, and the opening 2 tracks are 2 of the weaker ones.

Walk With Me is a reasonable enough track which showcases Young's guitar sound and Lanois' production, which relies on the use of loops, bleeps etc, which occupy the last minute or so of the song. Sign of Love references Drive Back, which is to my ears, the least successful track on Zuma. Similarly on this album, this track is relatively pedestrian.

Someone's Gonna Rescue You takes a little inspiration from the midsection of The Doors' The End. While it sounds unremarkable at first, its overall `spaciness' creeps up on you, though Neil Young's high-pitched vocal doesn't quite suit the song. Still it's an improvement on the opening tracks. There's a hint of Old Man in the melody, though it's well buried by guitar and studio trickery.

The 2 acoustic tracks Love and War and Peaceful Valley Boulevard are as strong a pair of song as anything in his back catalogue. Love and War sounds like a classic Neil Young acoustic track. Without making it sound like this album is playing spot the old song reference, the melody is a little reminiscent of Hey Hey, My My. There's a Spanish feel to the middle of this track, along the lines of Freedom's Eldorado with some wonderful guitar playing.

After the return of the loops and heavy guitar that is Angry World, Hitchhiker is probably the strongest of the electric tracks, with a powerful vocal over a vintage Neil Young guitar progression. The aforementioned acoustic Peaceful Valley Boulevard is excellent, with echoes of Pocahontas running through it. The similarities are subtle, none of these tracks sound overly like anything else in his catalogue. Only with repeated listens do some of the melodies start to evoke older tracks. The guitar playing in this track gives it a particularly lonely feel, aided by excellent production.

Rumblin' is the final track, and has another fine melody as Neil Young exhorts himself, singing "when will I learn how to listen". Though the album's initially a little difficult, it sounds better and better the more you listen to it, and there's no real precedent for it in Neil Young's vast back catalogue. It's great that he's pushing himself to do something new.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A masterpiece from the master, 1 Oct. 2010
This review is from: Le Noise (Audio CD)
A stunning and emotive album from the master songwriter and musician. Stand out tracks:- 'Walk with me', an emotional song to friends past and present backed by the distorted sounds from his past. 'Love and War', as he says; its what I sing about and boy it is an emotional high. The autobiographical 'The Hitchhiker' opens the doors and lets us in to his early life of turmoil and pain; while 'Peaceful Valley Boulevard' is one of the most beautiful and amazing songs that he has ever written. 'Le Noise' it certainly is, but what a sweet, sweet sound.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 28 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Le Noise
Le Noise by Neil Young (Audio CD - 2010)
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews