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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on 11 September 2010
When this album was cut February of 1959 both the principals were members of Miles Davis's small group. Davis, perhaps more than anyone else in jazz at the time, knew talent when he heard it and these men had it in abundance.

This album thus gives listeners the chance to compare and contrast the two saxophonists. It could be said that Adderley offered a summary of where the music had come from while Coltrane offered an insight into where it was going next, but that assertion is the product of the dubious benefit of hindsight.

Sure it's true that the mile-wide streak of blues that was always an element of Adderley's work is present and correct, but his work on `Stars Fell On Alabama' is that of a man not incapable of reflection for all of his tendency to push at the beat.

On `You're A Weaver Of Dreams' Coltrane is downright scary. His sound and approach are those of a man passionately working his way through something as cold as a mathematical formula, and indeed it can be argued that no-one in the now extensively documented history of the music has come close to him in that respect.

As a bonus this disc also includes the album `Cannonball Takes Charge' which lives up to its title in view of the fact that it features more or less the same band minus Coltrane. Given his musical proclivities it's hardly surprising that he takes charge in no uncertain terms on `Barefoot Sunday Blues' His manner is at odds with that of Coltrane as much as it is anywhere on the earlier date, but then what does jazz amount to if it's played by clones?
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
There are two studio albums on this CD both recorded within days of each other, and the recording of Miles Davis' "Kind Of Blue".
All five musicians on "In Chicago" were on KOB. Despite its title this is not a concert recording. The choice of music is interesting ranging from what I recall as a favourite of "trad" bands: "Limehouse Blues" to ballads such as "Stars Fell On Alabama" to originals by both major saxophonists. The music is both engaging and entertaining, and there are marked contributions by Wynton Kelly, Paul Chambers and Jimmy Cobb.
I tend to just sit back and listen to the music, but here is an opportunity for students to compare and contrast the styles of these two "giants" of jazz saxophone history.
Coltrane is absent on the second album "Takes Charge" so we have a quartet (on some tracks there is a change of bass and drummer). Here we have a selection of ballads and blues.

The CD as a whole has "grown on me" and I find it enjoyable, but it isn't a match for some of the albums to follow e.g. "Them Dirty Blues", "At The Lighthouse", "In San Francisco".
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
TOP 500 REVIEWERon 20 November 2013
This excellent reissue combines two 1959 Cannonball Adderley albums, 'Quintet In Chicago' & 'Cannonball Takes Charge'.
Tracks 1-6('Quintet In Chicago') were recorded on February 3, 1959 with Adderley(alto sax); John Coltrane(tenor sax); Wynton Kelly(piano); Paul Chambers(bass) & Jimmy Cobb(drums) all of whom appeared on Miles Davis's classic 'Kind of Blue' album recorded a month or so later.
Adderley's exuberant alto playing makes a striking contrast with Coltrane's more intense tenor style.
Highlights include 'Limehouse Blues', Adderley's feature on 'Stars Fell On Alabama' and Coltrane's 'The Sleeper'.
Tracks 7-13('Cannonball Takes Charge') were recorded in New York on April 23/27 & May 12, 1959 with Adderley(alto sax); Wynton Kelly(piano); Paul Chambers or Percy Heath(bass) & Jimmy Cobb or Albert 'Tootie' Heath(drums) playing six standards and Cannonball's 'Barefoot Sunday Blues'.
This 72-minute CD is an ideal introduction to Cannonball Adderley's often underrated alto saxophone playing.

BTW ~ This review applies only to the POLL WINNERS RECORDS reissue(2010).
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on 10 November 2013
Originally called "Cannonball and Coltrane" taking time off from the Miles Davis Quintet in 1959. "Limehouse Blues" is a knockout taken at breakneck tempo. The other tracks don't quite live up to that standard, but are still very good. "Stars Fell On Alabama" is a ballad feature for Cannonball, and "Weaver Of Dreams" ditto for Coltrane. Superb rhythm section of Wynton Kelly, Paul Chambers and Jimmy Cobb.
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