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59 of 62 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The video that played with my mind...
WOW! Read the book then watch the film. I didn't think it would be possible to match the gripping tale a told in the written word but this film really succeeds. The fact it is filmed in Swedish is a definite positive - not that I speak a word of the language - but the subtitles work well and it's a gripping watch from start to finish. Well done.
Published on 9 Oct 2010 by gasmangeoff

versus
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Did I see the same film as everyone else?
So I know, everyone loves the books. However, coming at this film from a purely cinematic view point I have to say that this second installment in the Millenium trilogy is sadly lacking, and here's why:
Whilst The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo [DVD, directed by Niels Arden Oplev, was a beautifully photographed and well observed journey into the dark heart of Swedish...
Published on 16 Dec 2011 by Mr. T. COLEMAN


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59 of 62 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The video that played with my mind..., 9 Oct 2010
This review is from: The Girl Who Played With Fire [Blu-ray] [2010] (Blu-ray)
WOW! Read the book then watch the film. I didn't think it would be possible to match the gripping tale a told in the written word but this film really succeeds. The fact it is filmed in Swedish is a definite positive - not that I speak a word of the language - but the subtitles work well and it's a gripping watch from start to finish. Well done.
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57 of 60 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Film of 2011, 3 Nov 2010
By 
Alan Burridge (Poole,, Dorset. United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
At 59 years of age, the best books in my life have been Lord Of The Rings, and Steig Larsson's Millennium Trilogy. Poles apart, but from a captivating 'must keep reading' angle, that's how it is.
Whilst reading the books, I smiled and doubted anyone could play Lisbeth Salander, so quirky was her character, and with such an odd and skinny body. But then we didn't know Sweden, much like they had Steig Larsson tucked up their sleeve, they also had Noomi Rapace - and the rest of the cast, of course.
Like the books, the movies are wonderful, dark timepieces set in a beautiful country, and despite much being omitted from the books to fit the 2 hour movie time-slot, the pace keeps you on the edge of your seat.
Read the books, watch the movies, you will not be let down by doing either and in any combination. The books have sold millions of copies for a very good reason, and the films will match them in the fullness of time. Top-Notch.
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224 of 238 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The girl full of fire, 8 Aug 2010
By 
E. A Solinas "ea_solinas" (MD USA) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
The late Stieg Larsson centered his Millennium Trilogy around cruelty towards women -- and the movie adaptations don't hold back either.

The second movie of the trilogy, "The Girl Who Played With Fire," is a tightly wound thriller that is almost as good as the first. It lacks some of the raw, wild, dark energy, but it tangles together some razor-sharp social commentary (sex trafficking) with car chases and conspiracies. Best of all, it still has brilliant performances by Michael Nyqvist and Noome Rapace.

A year after "The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo," Millennium magazine has a new reporter -- Dag Svensson (Hans Christian Thulin) and his girlfriend are doing reports on sex trafficking and prostitution. But then Mikael (Nyqvist) finds both of them dead in their apartment, and Nils Bjurman (Peter Andersson) -- the cruel "guardian" who raped Lisbeth -- has been brutally shot in the head.

Since Lisbeth (Rapace) just returned to Stockholm (and threatened to shoot Bjurman), she becomes the No. 1 suspect in all three murders. Even though, y'know, she had no motive for two of them.

Of course, Mikael doesn't believe that she did it -- especially since a hostile blond giant is going around beating up anyone (a trainer, a casual girlfriend) who might know Lisbeth's whereabouts. As Lisbeth goes on her own dark mission, she tells Mikael that he should look for someone named "Zala." But when Mikael starts hunting for information on this mystery man, he also learns more about Lisbeth's dark past...

Lisbeth Salander was something of a mystery in "The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo" -- we knew she was troubled, a brilliant hacker, and had been in a psych ward. But "The Girl Who Played With Fire" rips away all that mystery and shows us where Lisbeth Salander came from, and how she became a lonely, punky avenging angel. It's pretty nasty, and it ends on a cliffhanger (for crying out loud!).

The biggest problem with this story is that it lacks the raw, primal energy that made the first movie so vibrant. But it's still a tightly-wound thriller with plenty of unpolished fighting, bloody violence, and some moments of bleak humor (Lisbeth "renting" a car after shoving the clerk in a locker). The most disturbing parts are undeniably the flashbacks to Lisbeth's past, both with her family and in a psych ward (depicted in a surreal, blurry-white nightmare).

And it's all wound around more unpleasant aspects of modern Swedish society, centering on cruelty towards women -- sex trafficking in a modern country, and the evil "Zala's" ability to get away with anything he wanted.

And while Nyqvist does a good job here, the real spotlight here is on Noome Rapace. This woman is brilliant -- all lean wildcat energy, haunted eyes and half-hidden pain. While Lisbeth seems to have healed a little from her past experiences (she seems more open and friendly), there's still a river of darkness flowing just under the surface, and Rapace does a particularly good job when Lisbeth goes a-hunting for the bad guys.

"The Girl Who Played With Fire" doesn't have the spark of the first movie, but it still has an electric brilliance and scathing social exploration.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sequel as good as the first, 2 May 2011
The second of the Millennium trilogy like the book was no disappointment. The twists and turns in the plot keeps your interest. Noomi Rapace plays Lisbeth with great conviction and quality - she is the character in the books - brilliant. Again the film is over 2 hours but holds your attention throughout. If the concluding episode is as good I can't wait to watch it. Michael Nyquist leads the rest of the film in a desperate chase to save our heroine and the will he/won't he keeps you guessing. Cracking finish.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A very good sequel that only just falls short of 'Dragon Tattoo's genius, 6 Mar 2011
This review is from: The Girl Who Played With Fire [Blu-ray] [2010] (Blu-ray)
Lisbeth and Mikael are back, as the titular 'girl' and journalist Mikael Blomkvist respectively, although they spend almost the entire film apart. As someone who hasn't read the books, I'm unaware of how faithful that is, so I'll just address the film as a sequel to the last movie. 'Dragon Tattoo' stood out for me as having a searingly intense and brave storyline for the hacker Lisbeth, and a challenging 'everyman' plot for Blomkvist, and while the shocks and abuse are slightly less for Lisbeth this time around, the story is a cleverly wrought idea centering around a new journalist's investigation into sex-slavery. Just as the story is about to go public, all hell breaks loose. Lisbeth finds herself on the run (not good for a girl with a distinct lack of social skills) and Blomkvist finds himself in an uphill batle to try to catch a determined bunch of criminals who have a lot to hide. There are some good villains this time around, mainly showcased by Mikael Spreitz as a towering blonde wall of muscle with a good line in menace and a nicely twisted nerve disorder.
The story is terrifically told, having just the right feeling to it. It never races like its more frantic American cousins of this type, but the plot proceeds sensibly and largely believably from one revelation to the next - most of them well worth the wait - until the film's sudden explosions of credible and exciting violence. The acting is uniformly excellent, and the story is very well directed to its brutal and exciting climax. One of the most startling revelations is gently underplayed with dignity, and once again Noomi Rapace's Lisbeth is essentially what 'the man' role in a Hollywood equivalent would be - uncovering most of the facts and doing most of the action. It all feels very realistic, even if the sex-slavery issue is largely skimmed past, and barring a slightly credulity-stretching revelation and 'hero moment' near the end, fantastically designed. It's also has an extremely realistic 'against the odds' feeling to the ending, and sets up the possibilities for the third and final film in a highly satisfying manner.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Did I see the same film as everyone else?, 16 Dec 2011
By 
Mr. T. COLEMAN "Jesus freak movie geek" (Coventry, UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
So I know, everyone loves the books. However, coming at this film from a purely cinematic view point I have to say that this second installment in the Millenium trilogy is sadly lacking, and here's why:
Whilst The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo [DVD, directed by Niels Arden Oplev, was a beautifully photographed and well observed journey into the dark heart of Swedish misogyny, this outing lacks any of the visual flare or driving narrative of it's predecessor. Daniel Alfredson takes over directorial duties, and it must be said he almost immediately wastes all the good will I had coming off the first film. Visually the film is an amateurish hodge-potch of shakey camera work (and not in a good way), with about half of the film being shot from low angles: yes, we get it Daniel, some characters are imposing, let it go. But Alfredson doesn't let it go: the film carries on and on with these visual cliches until I was literally rolling my eyes in frustration.
Then there's the turgid narrative. It is neither interesting nor original. This might be more Larsson's fault than Alfredson, but some of the characters are absolute wafer thin cut outs: an uber villain without nuance or redeeming feature? You got it! A lumbering henchman with a strange medical condition that makes him impervious to pain? Coming right up! It really did feel like sub-Bond characters grafted onto a more serious story around the exploitation of women. Couple this with plot holes you could drive a bus through and it just irredeemably cheapens the whole thing. I'm sorry: sex trafficking is a serious and real issue, and it deserves a better treatment than a narrative that lumbers along like the bleached-blonde bad guy.
Finally, the performances are uneven. Noomi Rapace is excellent as Salander, and if there is any justice she will go on to have a long and fruitful career ahead of herself. However the supporting cast are almost uniformly forgettable. Lena Endre (playing magazine editor Erika Berger) should be singled out as a wet weekend of a character when she should be more spunky, strong, determined. And Michael Nyqvist is nothing more than adequate as the tepid Blomkvist, an journalist who might just be Salander's salvation.
All in all this is amateurish stuff. As I said at the outset, this is a critique of the film as it stands without relying on the novel to beef up it's credentials. For Larsson fans this may be a great addition to the rapidly expanding pantheon of Millenium adaptions, but to regular cinema goers it's just a cliche riddled, momentum-less slab of flabby rubbish. Somebody forgot to bring the thrills.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars SUPERB, 19 May 2011
I read the three books and was really enthralled. A friend of mine said his mother had seen this film and thought it was awful. So I bought the DVD. Can't possibly think what good films she's seen if she thinks this is "awful."
It's really good. Faithful to the book.
Choice of watching it in Swedish with subtitles or with dubbed English. Speaking a little bit of Swedish, I chose the former and was really pleased.
Great DVD - especially with the extra interview with Noomi Rapace.
Buy it - watch it - love it, as I did !
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Great film, poor quality Blu-Ray, 11 Jan 2011
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This review is from: The Girl Who Played With Fire [Blu-ray] [2010] (Blu-ray)
Despite a change of director alongside a comparatively distinct lack of plot twists it was very enjoyable. However the HD transfer was very poor. The worst evidence of this was at a fade edit at about 27 mins in when the screen goes black and there is enough visual disturbance to make you think you're watching a VHS and not a supposedly state of the art Bluray. Dodgy end theme too but all that said it's well worth a watch.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The girl who played with fire, 29 Aug 2011
By 
Mrs. Suzanne W. Clark "Sue" (Colchester, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Girl Who Played With Fire [Blu-ray] [2010] (Blu-ray)
This was gripping and the ending was a cliff hanger. It kept to the spirit of the book revealing a lot of Salander's past and therefore explained a lot of the reasons for her actions.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars fantastic!, 9 May 2011
By 
Brockway (leeds) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Girl Who Played With Fire [Blu-ray] [2010] (Blu-ray)
I was gripped by this film. It was fantastic. My partner thinks the book is better, but having not read the book, I found film unmissable and fantastic. Wasn#t sure I could see much difference in blue-ray quality between this and standard DVD. I think some discs it is clearer.
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The Girl Who Played With Fire [Blu-ray] [2010]
The Girl Who Played With Fire [Blu-ray] [2010] by Daniel Alfredson (Blu-ray - 2011)
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