Customer Reviews


25 Reviews
5 star:
 (10)
4 star:
 (9)
3 star:
 (3)
2 star:
 (2)
1 star:
 (1)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Intelligent and very readable
In line with other reviews so far, I thought this was an excellent book. Set in Istanbul in 2027 5 years after Turkey joins the EU, it covers multiple, linked story-strands covering subjects such as religion, politics, nano-tech, economics, terrorists and legends including the Mellified Man (don't bother looking it up, just enjoy it in the book).

There are...
Published on 9 Sep 2010 by John Tierney

versus
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Maybe write about Belfast next time
As an avid reader of cyberpunk and a former resident of Istanbul, I was sure that I would enjoy The Dervish House. And I did, in the beginning. Then the mistakes started piling up and finally the inconsistencies and lack of credible detail have ruined this book for me.

Dedicating pages in the beginning of the book to Turkish pronunciation is all well and good...
Published on 8 Aug 2012 by Z de MC


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Intelligent and very readable, 9 Sep 2010
By 
John Tierney (Wirral, UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
In line with other reviews so far, I thought this was an excellent book. Set in Istanbul in 2027 5 years after Turkey joins the EU, it covers multiple, linked story-strands covering subjects such as religion, politics, nano-tech, economics, terrorists and legends including the Mellified Man (don't bother looking it up, just enjoy it in the book).

There are numerous characters who are faily well sketched - the ousted academic, the child detective with a heart complaint, the stock market swindler and his religious-artefact selling wife, the disturbed fanatic and the nano-tech entrepeneurs. McDonald weaves their stories very skillfully and vividly paints a picture of near-future Istanbul and the integration of new technology into an ancient city.

I really enjoyed "River of Gods" but couldn't finish "Brasyl" for some reason. But this is by some way the best book I have read this year. McDonald successfully merges good story-lines with believable future-technology and writes it well. Any author who can come up with a line such as "Smell is the djinni of memory, all times are one to it" has my admiration.

If you want intelligent, well-written near-future science-fiction, you can't go wrong with this book. Highly recommended.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A wonderful book, 9 Aug 2010
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
McDonald has set pretty high expectations with his last two books, but this one doesn't disappoint.

The Dervish House unfolds in a compelling near future Istanbul, a heady mix of history, cultures and ubiquitous nanotechnology. It tells the intertwined stories of six characters, spanning five days of an Istanbul heat wave: a gas options trader with a get rich quick plan, an antiquarian commissioned to find a fabulous mythical artefact; a retired Professor of Economics wounded by ethnic persecution and a love lost, a troubled mystic who sees djinn and talks with saints, a "Marketing Consultant" called in to save the family nanotechnology start-up, and a boy detective with the coolest nanotech toy ever.

With treasure hunts, terrorist plots, wheeling and dealing, and a high tech shoot out, the Dervish House is fast paced and a real page turner. True to style however, McDonald's characters are well rendered and believable, his ideas first class and his writing is complex and mature.

A wonderful book!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another in a long line of masterpieces...., 28 Aug 2010
By 
A. J. Poulter "AP" (Edinburgh) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
The novel is set in the Istanbul of 2027. Turkey is now part of the EU. It starts with a bang.

Necdet, who was disowned by his family, bar his brother, is on a tram to work when a smiling woman blows her own head off. Shocked by the event, he doesn't realize how badly he was affected until he starts seeing ghosts (djinn) everywhere. The traffic-jam aftermath makes Leyla miss her best chance of a job. She has to fall back on family connections to represent her cousins who want to get financing for a wacky nano-tech start-up. Ayse, an art dealer is offered a lot of money to find a legend, a "Mellified Man", an ancient corpse preserved in honey, and decides to take up the challenge, despite misgivings about her client because of his aftershave. Her husband is cooking up a massive deal of his own, using his skills as a gas market-trader and his special knowledge of a disused gas pipeline going back into embargoed Iran. Can Durukan, a young deaf boy, sends his shape-changing spy bots to the site of the bombing and tracks a mysterious bot that was recording the event. As a wannabe detective he never lets up his search for the truth.Finally, Georgios Ferentinou, an ex-University economics lecturer and erstwhile radical, gets an offer of a job with a think tank doing blue-sky research into possible terrorist attacks. He confronts an old enemy and seeks a lost love.

All the characters are residents of the Dervish House at Adem Dede Square. The Dervishes were a now-vanished sect. The house is a relic of Istanbul's past. The novel subtly weaves together historical and mythical views of the city and its peoples, while at the same time investigating the possible futures offered by nano-tech and EU membership. All the various characters and their story arcs converge by the end of the six days in which the action takes place. River of Gods and Brasyl are tough acts to follow, but this one is better than both, which is no mean feat. The writing, the creative vision and the near-future science fiction are flawless. It ought to win every award going. I wonder what can possibly come next?
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Maybe write about Belfast next time, 8 Aug 2012
As an avid reader of cyberpunk and a former resident of Istanbul, I was sure that I would enjoy The Dervish House. And I did, in the beginning. Then the mistakes started piling up and finally the inconsistencies and lack of credible detail have ruined this book for me.

Dedicating pages in the beginning of the book to Turkish pronunciation is all well and good but there were spelling mistakes in at least half of the Turkish words and names used in this book - For example, it's Aslantepe not "Aslanteppe", Hacettepe not "Haceteppe", Osmanli not "Ösmanli", Meryem Ana Firtinasi not "Firtanisi" as it was repeatedly misspelled, meaning "Tempest of Mother Mary" and definitely not "Wind of September" especially since it happens in mid-October.

Characters don't feel authentic, not least because they say things like "I will see you when I see you" that are impossible to say in Turkish in any meaningful way, they serve pistachios with coffee (always served with alcohol, never with coffee) and they refer to each other by their last names, which NEVER happens in Turkey. Turks didn't even have surnames prior to 1934. It is pretty obvious that the author doesn't know this - Haci Ferhat's descendant is called Beshun Ferhat, which is highly unlikely given that "Ferhat" was his given name and Haci was an honorific title meaning "Muslim who has done the Hajj to Mecca".

There were so many things that didn't ring true, and one was Adnan speaking in English with a trader from Baku in Azerbaijan, saying the other guy just didn't speak good English. Why on earth would these two people struggle with English over the phone anyway, given that they both speak Turkish?!

All of the above to one side, my personal favourite which truly shows the author's ignorance about Turks and Turkish is when Mr Ferentinou says to Can "You said 'he'. Interesting that we assume robots are male". Highly unlikely that Can would or could ever say such a thing, since THERE IS NO "HE" OR "SHE" IN THE TURKISH LANGUAGE. This just made me laugh :-)

In short, The Dervish House would have been a pretty awesome book if it were set in a city author is actually familiar with, with characters he understands, who talk in a language he knows. Honestly, I think Mr McDonald should write about Belfast, where he lives, and leave places like Istanbul to those who know them a bit better.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


14 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars McDonald at his very best!, 31 July 2010
By 
Patrick St-Denis "editor of Pat's Fantasy Hot... (Laval, Quebec Canada) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
When I gave Guy Gavriel Kay's Under Heaven its perfect score a few weeks back, I was persuaded that no other speculative fiction work could possibly even come close to it in terms of quality. And yet, I knew full well that the ARC for Ian McDonald's The Dervish House was sitting on my desk, practically begging me to read it. And still I believed that Kay's latest would reign supreme as the best SFF book of 2010 -- at least in this house. The more fool me, I know. . .

Considering how much I loved River of Gods, Brasyl, and Cyberabad Days, I'm aware that I should have waited a bit longer before granting Under Heaven its crown. After all, every McDonald title I've read since the creation of the Hotlist ended up in my top reads of that year. Call it Canadian patriotism or whatever you like, but I really wanted Guy Gavriel Kay to finish in pole position at the end of 2010. Unfortunately, Ian McDonald had another think coming for me.

The Dervish House is without a doubt his best and most accessible science fiction novel to date. And to put it simply, it just blew my mind. Believe me, I did try to find some shortcomings and facets that left a little to be desired. All to no avail, of course. The Dervish House is about as good as it gets, folks. McDonald's past novels had already set the bar rather high, no question. But this one, at least for me, is as close to perfection as a book can get.

Here's the blurb:

It begins with an explosion. Another day, another bus bomb. Everyone it seems is after a piece of Turkey. But the shock waves from this random act of twenty-first-century pandemic terrorism will ripple further and resonate louder than just Enginsoy Square.

Welcome to the world of The Dervish House--the great, ancient, paradoxical city of Istanbul, divided like a human brain, in the great, ancient, equally paradoxical nation of Turkey. The year is 2027 and Turkey is about to celebrate the fifth anniversary of its accession to the European Union, a Europe that now runs from the Arran Islands to Ararat. Population pushing one hundred million, Istanbul swollen to fifteen million, Turkey is the largest, most populous, and most diverse nation in the EU, but also one of the poorest and most socially divided. It's a boom economy, the sweatshop of Europe, the bazaar of central Asia, the key to the immense gas wealth of Russia and central Asia. The Dervish House is seven days, six characters, three interconnected story strands, one central common core--the eponymous dervish house, a character in itself--that pins all these players together in a weave of intrigue, conflict, drama, and a ticking clock of a thriller.

Previous novels by McDonald took some time to get into, as the author used the early part of each of his work to build the groundwork for what was to come. Uncharacteristically, in The Dervish House McDonald's tale grabs hold of you from the get-go and won't let go till you reach the very end. I wasn't expecting the novel to make such a powerful impression right from the very first pages. But as soon as that woman detonates herself inside Tram 157 near Necatibey Cadessi, any hope I had of ever being able to put down this book evaporated immediately.

Seemingly effortlessly (don't know how he manages to do it, but McDonald's always makes this look easy), the author captured the essence of 21st century Turkey on countless levels. His evocative prose brings Istanbul to life in vivid fashion. His undeniable eye for details creates an imagery and an atmosphere that will delight and impress readers in myriad ways. As is the author's wont, the worldbuilding is superb. His depiction of a futuristic Turkey now part of the EU is even more memorable than his thrilling depictions of India and Brazil were. Whether its the country's political and social psyche, or mundane details such as what people are having for breakfast, McDonald's narrative makes you feel as though you're part of the action.

The Dervish House is not split into usual chapters. Instead, the story takes place during seven days, beginning with that fateful terrorist bus bombing. The tale unfolds through the eyes of six disparate characters, with the dervish house connecting these various plotlines together. I felt at first that the contrasting personalities would perhaps create a somewhat discordant whole, but Ian McDonald makes them all come together in a surprising manner. As was the case with River of Gods, when the multilayered storylines converge, the author's genius and his gift for well-crafted characterization shine through.

Though every character has his or her part to play in the overall story arc, Necdet, who was staring at the woman on the tram when she blew herself up, could be what one might consider the central character. Yet that's not entirely true, as the rest of the cast, even if they do so sometimes indirectly, plays as important a role in the greater scheme of things. The boy Can Durukan is particularly well-realized, and his relationship with Georgios Ferentinou showed that the author possesses a deft human touch. Still, Ayse Erkoç was, for me, probably the most interesting of the bunch. Another great aspect of The Dervish House is that every single character has a backstory, making them all three-dimensional protagonists. Hence, although the novel is a thought-provoking work of science fiction, it is nevertheless a character-driven read.

The pace, even though it is never a factor, is not always crisp. The narrative slows down considerably in the POV portions of both Adnan Sarioglu and Leyla Gültasli. And yet, when McDonald's reveals the true importance of each plotline and how it's connected to the overall story arc, that's when things get really interesting!

Perhaps because fundamentalist islamic terrorists and the emergence of Turkey and its possible accession to the European Union have made the news quite often these last few years, many of the themes found within the pages of The Dervish House feel more actual and better known and understood than those of McDonald's previous novels. Which is why I feel that The Dervish House, while showcasing Ian McDonald at his very best in terms of thought-provoking storytelling skills, just might be his most accessible work to date.

The Dervish House deserves the highest possible recommendation. If you only have money to buy a single scifi novel this year, this has to be it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars I wasn't expecting my SF to shape my future travel preferences, 4 Dec 2013
By 
P. J. Dunn "Peter Dunn" (Warwickshire) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This has got to be one of Ian McDonald's top five books, and it certainly sits alongside River of Gods as one of the two best of his group of unconnected books set in the futures of a range of fast developing countries.

I can see from one or two other reviewers that some Turkish readers feel that some of his attempts to employ Turkish language were perhaps a little too brave, and produced sufficient errors to annoy such readers. For that I knock a star off what otherwise would be a perfect score. My own shameful ignorance of the language shielded me from being distracted by such errors. What I was left with was, not only a great read, but something that stirred and built my interest in the place and its people, moving Turkey, and Istanbul in particular, far up the list of countries I really want to visit - preferably on or before 2025 really comes around. I really wasn't expecting my science fiction reading to also shape my future travel preferences...
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Parson's egg, 19 April 2013
By 
P. J. A. Jennings "pja_jennings" (Oxfordshire) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I found this book's interwoven story lines intriguing. Set in 2027, it is a plausible near future with many elements we would recognise from the present. It combines mysticism, terrorism, hi-tech, white collar crime and other ideas into a satisfying whole. However I found it a difficult book to read. One of those where you read a few pages then put it down for a bit. It took me two weeks to finish it. Another reviewer with a good knowledge of Turkey and Istanbul has pointed out that there are numerous mistakes in the setting, spelling, names and things that can and cannot be said in Turkish, so I agree it could just as easily been set in a city the author knew rather than one he didn't, with adjustments to the plot lines of course. My thoughts all along were "why are we ploughing through so many Turkish words and names with their 29 character alphabet when anglicised ones would have done for all but Turkish speaking readers, of whom there appears to have been but one".
Nevertheless, despite being a "difficult" read, the complex story lines all come together in the end and make this a satisfying and enjoyable book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great sense of place, interesting SF, 18 Feb 2013
I very much enjoyed this book, and I can see why it won a BSFA award.
Set in near future Istanbul, it covers a week in the lives of six characters who live/work in an old dervish house on the European side of the city. In many ways the main character is Istanbul itself, various parts and periods of the city are explored in detail, at times it is almost poetical. I have never been to Istanbul and my knowledge of its history is limited to back when it was Constantinople, but the sense of the city and it's history are so strong that I felt I had some understanding of it - this is almost certainly an illusion, but creating powerful illusions is a mark of good fiction.
The SF elements are mostly nanotechnology and advances in robotics. These allow for swarms of tiny robotic components that can reassemble into a variety of shapes for different uses. Nanotechnology lets people increase the performance of their brains and bodies, and one of the plotlines is about visionary technology that could see humanity altered entirely. There is also a strong vein of history in the book too, which is probably one of the reasons I enjoyed it. There is the recent (from our viewpoint, future) history of Turkey joining the EU. There are bittersweet memories of the 80s, when young love existed against political upheaval. There is the legacy of the Ottoman Empire, its decline and Turkey's liberation. There is plenty of Islamic history and mythology as one character searches for a lost artifact and another has mystical creatures enter their life - this sense of the fantastic is probably another reason I enjoyed the book so much, I do like a bit of Science Fantasy.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Genuinely Brilliant., 26 April 2012
By 
Mr. L. J. Counter (London, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
The Dervish House was the second Ian McDonald book I read (the first being the also excellent Cyberabad Days). A friend recommended both books to me as he knew I was a massive fan of William Gibson, Jon Courtney Grimwood and Peter F Hamilton. While I was expecting this one to be good I didn't think it would be as good as Cyberabad Days however it actually surpassed it.

I've read various books that people describe as being as good as Gibson however normally they seem a pale reflection that simply try to copy his ideas, in the case of the Dervish House though I really believe the parallel is worth making.

Set in the Istanbul of the near future the plot is well conceived and features a large cast of diverse characters who I found very quickly I cared about whether I liked them or not.

Basically I can't recommend it enough.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Not suffi-ring ......, 16 Nov 2010
By 
Mr. R. Burley - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Having read much of Ian MacDonald's previous work, I was pleasantly surprised that he has raised the bar yet again. Reminiscent of Dickens in the layered plots and intertwined characters yet still managing to convincingly thread in copious historical and architectural detail within a low accented cyber punk backdrop, the book shows a deft touch in mapping out not only a modern Turkey but it's schizophrenic split between modern aspirations, European and Asian situation and heritage and a layered past not yet relinquished. The characters are widely dispersed in terms of occupation, education, wealth and age and the handling of their interactions is deft and believable. The technical advances of McDonald's world are seamlessly injected into the narrative including their limitations and disadvantages - which is rare. The book also avoids being dogmatic, allowing various potentially moralistic elements of the plot to remain 'unresolved', the reader not being steered towards any absolute conclusion but left to form a view for themselves.

I toyed with giving a five star rating but eventually settled on four stars for two reasons. (i) I thought the literary McGuffin of the returning Greek lady amour could have taken an additional twist and/or been resolved earlier in the absence of, said, twist (to be honest, for the first half of the book I thought there was a good chance she was dead) and (ii) I don't want the author to get too settled. I am waiting, Ian - what's next?
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

The Dervish House (Gollancz)
£3.99
Add to wishlist See buying options
Only search this product's reviews