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37 Reviews
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18 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Keep listening Interpol fans
It's been a long wait, and I definitely understand where "Dan" and Jonboy" are coming from, but i have to say I think Interpol have come back with another fantastic album, re-affirming their status as simply the best band out there. Just like OLTA, this album is a grower, and now having listened to it all of the way(s) through 5 or 6 times, it gets better and better. Why...
Published on 7 Sep 2010 by Maf1

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Can do better!
Not their best work by a long way. The first two albums are just SO much better than this. It's a shame because i really wanted this to be a return to form. x
Published 3 months ago by Dr Emma V Morris


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2.0 out of 5 stars Plodding, 8 Sep 2014
By 
Guy T. Smith (Ealing, London United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Interpol (Audio CD)
Beneath the plodding there is still a glimmer of the Interpol of Turn on the bright lights and Antics.
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5 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars ...I think I get it now....., 17 Sep 2010
This review is from: Interpol (Audio CD)
After 12 listens now I simply cannot get these tunes out of my head. After experiencing every feeling about this CD as every previous reviewer it has taken a dozen listens to realise that this album is truly sublime.

I have to say I've grown weary of reading the reviews here endlessly harping on about this being nowhere near as good as TOBL. To me that just smacks of 'people who were there at the beginning' not really liking the fact the band has wider exposure now and that the greater fan base has taken 'their' precious band away from them. TOBL has always been the weakest (and overrated) of the four albums anyway in my opinion.

I can't see the problem that people have with the new direction the band has taken. It really is no different to the evolution that Radiohead took from The Bends to HTTT though OKC and KA. It didn't do their career and musical creativity any harm did it?!

My fave track here is Safe Without. Bizarrely no-one seems to have mentioned this track in previous reviews either.

Standout track though has to be Lights. Utterly immense it typifies the whole thing Interpol are about. Incredible bass, spacious and parsimonious use of guitar, and vocals delivered with restrained menace.

Four albums. All different. Simple as.
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Never Malaise!, 8 Sep 2010
This review is from: Interpol (Audio CD)
The release of a new Interpol album is always something of an event, but in recent years I suspect many fans have begun to doubt the band's the ability to ever again make anything as decent as the modern classic that is Turn on the Bright Lights. Indeed, this fourth album is not as good as that earlier masterpiece, but it is however the best thing they've done since then, precisely for the reason that it's so different to TOTBL or Antics/Our Love to Admire. The arc those albums seemed to follow suggested Interpol were moving from a dark and mysterious sound to a lighter, more poppy one, but with Interpol they've gone the other way - the songs are darker, more about texture, and the hooks and choruses are less obvious.

Whereas Antics and OLTA were full of great individual songs, Interpol is a more immersive listen, and works best when played as a whole from start to finish. Many tracks thump along to a constant beat while simple melodies repeat themselves over and over and guitars and synths drone endlessly in the background. Album highlight 'Always Malaise (The Man I Am)' is a good example, playing like a more developed version of 'Hands Away' from the first album. I'll admit I wasn't too impressed with 'Lights' as an individual song, but in the context of the album it makes perfect sense. The album as a whole is a grower so give it about five listens before you judge.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Absolutely great, 11 Oct 2011
This review is from: Interpol (Audio CD)
Although this new Interpol album hasn't received many favorable reviews and reactions from both critics and the band's fans, in my opinion, this is actually one of the finest efforts on behalf of Interpol and in the genre in general. The homonymous release shows a departure from the "indie" ground towards post-punk revival and a more back-to-basics organic rock sound. It features some upbeat rock and punk tunes, like in the case of Success, Barricade - "I did not take to analysis / So I had to make up my mind / And hold it for a while / Thieves and snakes need homes" - or Malaise (The Man I Am). Also, perhaps what catches the eyes most are the penetrating melodies, riffs and lyrics of the down-tempo songs, the likes of All of the Ways - "Does he make you smile? / Does he fully embrace the way?" and The Undoing.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Essential listening for Interpol fans, 8 Nov 2010
This review is from: Interpol (Audio CD)
Possibly lacking the really great tracks from earlier albums but retains a similar sound. 'Summer Well' is classic Interpol. Really looking forward to the tour starting later in the month (Nov-10).
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "I was on my way to tell you it's no good"....., 13 Sep 2010
By 
BigRich (Yorkshire, England) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Interpol (Audio CD)
......to borrow a line from Mr Banks on closing track The Undoing, but then a strange thing happened....

I first got into Interpol shortly after the release of Antics, following a recommendation of that album from my brother. Before that i had been aware of them, if not their music, but had assumed that these New York hipsters, if for no other reason than the fact they hailed from the same city, would be Strokes-esque, who in my opinion at the time were the emperors new clothes, and so i entirely through my own prejudice and ignorance missed out on getting into Totbl in the order that god intended. Anyways, having spent a few weeks gradually getting more and more hooked by Antics i bought Totbl and in turn fell in love with that album too. For the following 2 years i listened to practically nothing but those 2 albums, nothing else out at the time even came close to the quality of them. I would say though that whilst Totbl is an incredible album-and one of the best debut records ever- i have always been firmly of the opinion that Antics is the better of the two, maybe it's because i heard it first, but to me it's just a more polished and accomplished work and the sound of a band truly at the top of their game- it is and always will be one of my very favourite albums.....

And so when Our Love to Admire was released in 2007 it carried with it an enormous burden of great expectation. But it was a major disappointment; anaemic and stark, the brooding basslines of its predecessors conspicuous by their abscence, dreadful production and a collection of tracks that really didn't belong on the same album giving the whole record a clunky and disjointed feel lifted only by Pioneer to the falls and Pace is the trick. Songs such as Wrecking Ball, Who do you think and the much lauded The Lighthouse shouldn't have made it on Interpol b-sides never mind an album. Put simply, it sucked...

And so to "Interpol". Having read the incredibly mixed bag of reviews, some claiming it was a triumphant return to form, others that it was now surely the end of the band such was the continuing demise in quality- and all clearly from people well versed in the world of the 'Pol- I was massively intrigued and couldn't wait to hear it and form my own opinion. And now i can see where both "camps" are coming from. The first time I listened to it, and indeed the second and third times, i was deeply unimpressed. But fully 6 listens in and it's really taken hold. The dynamics of Antics are back, in so much as a 4-piece band all firing on all cylinders, songs that build subtley both on the record and in your mind so that you begin to crave another listen of the album in full again and again, Denglers bass work some of his best to date and superb production lending it the multi-layered texture that both Antics and Totbl had. Tracks such as Try it on, Lights and Summer Well are up there with Vintage Interpol, and they just get better and better. Dont get me wrong, Interpol isn't as good as either of their first 2 (what is?), but it is in my opinion a great return to form and will, for most fans who persevere with it if not all, reward their persistence. 9/10.

Have upgraded it to 5 stars after further repeated listens. It's genius..
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Interpol is a must, 4 Nov 2010
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This review is from: Interpol (Audio CD)
My girlfriend introduced me to a song of this group, which I liked, so when I saw this was the latest album of Interpol, I bought it for her. Little did I know, that I would fall in love with these songs. Excellent choice
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars five star return, 23 Sep 2010
By 
J. T. Brennan (Oxford, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Interpol (Audio CD)
Its been a while since I wrote any reviews, but after listening to this album (probably over 20 times to by now), I feel compelled to eulogise just a little about it.
Four albums in can be difficult, for some bands the sound can start to sound stale and I guess it can be quite easy to go through the numbers a bit. With Interpol though I've always suspected that they could build on their already impressive back catalogue and I think this album proves that they have.
Whilst not as easily accessible as Antics or Our love to Admire, I hate to say this but 'Interpol' grows on you more and more with each repeated listen. As a cliché I've always thought it was a pretty bad one but in this case it seems far to apt to use, so I'm probably stuck with it. The reason why I think this album is a grower is not because you wont like it to start with, but that it seems to have more layers the more you listen to it. There are more instant tracks like the punchy 'success' and excellent first single 'lights' (awesome bass), but the real depth and beauty of this album can be found on the likes of 'memory serves', 'always malaise' and 'safe without'. Each one of these songs builds up as it goes along and together as with the rest of the tracks they fit together perfectly. After a few listens you will find it impossible to get the refrain from 'memory serves' out of your head or the repeat of 'safe without'.
There honestly isn't a bad track, my favourite being 'The Undoing' which is a fitting end to the album, and possibly the most sincere track I've heard from the band. That being said you may find like I do that these songs work much better together, and you can't pick out individual tracks the way you can on their older records. Still I'm going to stick my neck out and say that I think this is their best album to date, a culmination of over ten years perfecting a sound that has matured nicely - Paul Banks sounds as superior as ever, no-one else sings quite like he does, and the influence of Carlos D is as evident as ever, it's a real shame that he has decided to call it a day but at least he has left on a high.
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Rearrage The Pieces, 18 Sep 2010
This review is from: Interpol (Audio CD)
Having weathered the post-NYC hyperbole that was left in The Strokes wake, Interpol are now entering a very interesting phase of their career. After the critical success of 2002's 'Turn On The Bright Lights' and its incredible follow-up 'Antics' (2004) it would have been easy for the band to retreat to type and earn a living by continualy touring those early landmarks and sporadically releasing a new record to be lapped up by the masses. Instaed in 2007 they released the inventive & underrated 'Our Love To Admire', which saw the band move in an ever more symphonic direction (personally I think that 'Wrecking Ball' & 'Lighthouse' are two of the bands finest moments to date). And this is a theme that is continued & expanded upon on this new self-titled release.

In fact, with the exception of lead-off single 'Barricade', you'd be hard pressed to find anything resembling a 'chart hit' on here. Songs such as 'Lights' and 'All Of The Ways' are more indicitive of the style the band are currently employing, with heavy use of guitarist Daniel Kessler's shimmering tremelo effect and singer Paul Banks's deep baritone wail used to an effective and emotionally charged whole. The reord at times feels very resiniscant of the british post punk legends Magazine's second album 'Seconhand Daylight' (1979) and much like that album, I fear that this will go largely misunderstood for years to come. Fans of their previous work who come to this record expecting more hits in the style of 'Obstacle 1' or 'PDA' will be sorely dissapointed, but give it time to envelope you and its subtle time changes and dark orchestral overtures will slowly work their way into your brain and won't leave without the bloodiest of battles.

Opener 'Success' starts with a typical Interpol style guitar, bass and drum refrain but pretty quikly you come to realise the band are not going to offer the money-shot, barn-storming chorus you'd usually come to expect, instead they let the song grow steadily and the introduction of strings later in the mix gives the track a stately feel. 'Memory Serves' and 'Summer Well' maybe offer a little more for the fan of old skool Interpol, with easily traceable choruses and lyrics of discomfort and remorse, but this is still the sound of a band who've moved past the point of caring for any chart success or festival sing-a-longs. The afore-mentioned 'Barricades' is easily the easiest song to pigeon hole as 'old skool' Interpol with its Hooky-style bassline and ferocious chorus making it a clear conender for the inevitable 'best of' compilation in years to come.

The second half of the record is also its most adventurous. 'Always Malaise' builds slowly into a creschendo of military drumming and doom-laden vocals, 'Safe Without' gives good use to goose-bump-inducing strings and a repetitive guitar & drum coda, whilst 'Try It On' has a plaintive piano played over yet more military style percussion. But it is with the penultimate track 'All Of The Ways' that the band really show a direction that could prove extremely rewarding in the years to come. This funereal track features no drum kit or percussion, instead it puts that trusty tremelo effect to use whilst inventive use of harmonising and chord structure give the song a breathtaking suspense. It is the highlight of the whole release and once again shows what a great vocalist Paul Banks is. He runs the full gambit of his range with falsetto becoming increasingly prominant as the song grows.

Overall, 'Interpol' is a great record and is another step in the evolution of the group. Hopefully they can continue this trend for their next release with I await with baited breath.
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Subtle Masterpiece, 9 Sep 2010
By 
Mr. S. L. Read "Simon L. Read" (Cardiff, Wales) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Interpol (Audio CD)
This album is a masterpiece.
If you are expecting a first listen, blow-your-socks-off experience, at first, you will not be impressed. I guess,' it's not for the casual music fan as it's not something most' can just pick up and understand off the bat.
One thing I've noticed about this album that separates it from Interpol's other albums is the amount of juxtaposition. There is a lot going on in each song but it's pieced together so well, and so subtly, that it works beautifully.
This isn't an 'indie-disco' album, it's not packed full of fun catchy tunes that you can dance and sing along to (okay, maybe 'Barricade', at a push), it's an album of carefully crafted pieces of art with many subtle layers (some of which you can only really pick out with good stereo headphones).
They've done a fantastic job on this. Perhaps even the album of the year so far.
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Interpol
Interpol by Interpol (Audio CD - 2010)
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