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4.6 out of 5 stars
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4.6 out of 5 stars
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on 10 August 2006
There's no doubt this is an excellent collection of singles but why buy this when you could buy the SNAP special edition double CD £1 cheaper. That has every song on this "best of" CD plus another 8 including "Away from the numbers" and "English Rose".
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on 17 October 2003
Growing up in the late 70's and early 80's the Jam were my Beatles.
The Greatest Hits package is a great place to start with, as the Jam were really a great Singles band.
When the first Greatest Hits package (called SNAP!)was released back in 1983, it came with a large volume of standout album tracks and B.sides which have some of the Jams finest 3 minutes, but I can't recommend this enough as a great album to buy to start with, Tube Station, Eton Rifles, Going Underground ,Thats Entertainment, Town called Malice and Precious are masterpieces of Singles.
For a snapshot of English life, you won't find better.
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on 17 August 2015
Between 1977 and 1982, The Jam enjoyed a string of solid Top 40 hits all of which are included here. After a slow start, their 9th chart appearance, 'The Eton Rifles', propelled the trio of Paul Weller, Bruce Foxton and Rick Buckler into the Top 10 and a further 8 Top 10 hits followed with 4 of them - 'Going Underground', 'Town Called Malice', 'Start' and 'Beat Surrender' - reaching the No. 1 spot. Quite simply, this is a superb collection of short, riffy songs which perfectly encapsulates the punk/New Wave era of its time. Recommended.
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on 14 November 1999
What can I say, The Jam have never disappointed me with any of their albums or individual tracks. There is a real mixture of Jam hits on here - from their very early stuff to their last hit, Beat Surrender. Totally inspiring music from a band who had so much talent. A must, must buy.
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on 17 June 2014
Bought 'In The city' when it first came out in Tower Records in Oxford Street or Regents Street in London and it seems like yesterday when I listen to this with all the raw energy of those early days. The later tracks are mostly pretty good too. Great introduction to the Jam.
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on 14 July 2016
Growing up in the late 70's and early 80's the Jam were a post punk angry new wave band.
They produced some snapshots of how youth felt at the time but more importantly, some snappy tunes.
Immerse yourself in some of Messrs Weller,Foxton and Bucklers best moments.
The Greatest Hits package is a great place to start with, as the Jam were really a great Singles band.
When the first Greatest Hits package (called SNAP!)was released back in 1983, it came with a large volume of standout album tracks and B.sides which have some of the Jams finest 3 minutes, but I can't recommend this enough as a great album to buy to start with, Tube Station, Eton Rifles, Going Underground ,Thats Entertainment, Town called Malice and Precious are masterpieces of Singles.
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on 21 June 2013
I hadn't heard much of The Jam before I bought this CD, but for a fiver I though I might as well. I was not disappointed, every song on there is cleverly written and the album is great to listen to and at times very entertaining. Weller is an excellent lyricist, as is Foxton. Would recommend to all.
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on 28 July 2015
There are now almost three times as many compilation albums dedicated to The Jam as there are original studio albums. In record industry executive Dennis Munday's largely affectionate account of working with The Jam and The Style Council at Polydor Records - The "Jam": Shout to the Top he defends that glut at the beginning of an impudently titled Chapter 8 ("The Last Jam Compilation Until The Next One!") saying that:

"Many fans have griped about the compilations released since the demise of The Jam... Since the early seventies Polydor have released around a dozen Best Of/Greatest Hits compilations by The Who and it's now industry practice to release a hits compilation of their best-selling artists every two years. As long as Paul is still at the top and whether we like it or not, the same will happen to The Jam and The Style Council, this is the nature of the modern record business - it's just a big money-go-round."

That point is proven by this Greatest Hits collection, which brings together the 18 chart singles - including two imports and three double A-sides - which this highly-influential rock group made, between 1977 to 1982, before disbanding at the peak of their popularity. Though it has different artwork, title, and sleevenote, this 1997 release has an almost identical tracklisting to 1984's Compact Snap.

Fortunately, that 21 song CD was a 5-star classic which included 4 chart-toppers ('Going Underground', 'Start', 'Town Called Malice', and 'Beat Surrender'). It had a brisk and bracing chronological approach that emphasised how in a brief, but hugely productive, five-and a half year spell this trio quickly - and skilfully - expanded their range of musical influences from their obvious 1960s references The Who, The Kinks and The Small Faces to Motown and Stax acts, and even embraced awkward post-punk groups like Gang Of Four and Wire.
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on 5 July 2010
The Jam are one of those perfect bands that start as you're getting into music, provide a soundtrack of hits to your youth and then break up after several albums without ever turning in a bad one. In the late 70's & early 80's music was still very tribal; mods `n' rockers, soul boys & greasers `n' all that. And one had to be in one in order to have any kinda gang to roam with. Shame. As a rocker it meant that certain bands were against the rules inc. The Jam. Sod that. The music fan finds a way. I had smart dudes in other tribes to feed me. I remember hearing All Around The World on 7" vinyl in a music class at school but it was All Mod Cons with the awesome Down In The Tube Station At Midnight that really did it for me. The story it tells and the images it creates as well as that killer bass line. The Eton Rifles, Going Underground, Precious & Beat Surrender all followed over the years leaving things on a high. Best of all though are floor filler Town Called Malice and the awesome, classic Strange Town about Weller's first trip to London.
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TOP 1000 REVIEWERon 8 February 2013
Paul Weller's band The Jam were a force to be reckoned with and their music always had a message. Wish I could remember the story where apparently, Start! was somehow linked with The Beatles. Brilliant album, lots of hits for Jam fans.
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