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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars For psychotherapists who want the neuroscience behind the theory
This book delivers what I want from it: a way to link ideas of psychotherapy, psychology and neuroscience. It starts with an overview of where psychotherapy is now, and the history behind the different modalities, before going on to the legacy of evolution on our brain and neural networks. Other parts explore how a healthy mind experiences the world, an integrated sense...
Published on 29 Nov 2010 by MAH

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9 of 20 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Waste of a good tree
The author piles conjecture upon conjecture, and seems to think that repeating that process often enough conveys the authority of a scientific proof. It doesn't. The text is also littered with complex sentences that don't mean anything. Accordingly, I find some difficulty in believing the conclusions he draws.
I'm sorry I bought this book.
Published on 22 Jun 2010 by L. Fitzgerald


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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars For psychotherapists who want the neuroscience behind the theory, 29 Nov 2010
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This book delivers what I want from it: a way to link ideas of psychotherapy, psychology and neuroscience. It starts with an overview of where psychotherapy is now, and the history behind the different modalities, before going on to the legacy of evolution on our brain and neural networks. Other parts explore how a healthy mind experiences the world, an integrated sense of itself and its social environment, as well as what happens when problems arise. When explained simply, neuroscience has much to offer psychotherapists who are seeking to improve their knowledge about why they are taught certain concepts and techniques. It is also well-researched: the references at the back of the hardback edition run to over 70 pages (the 'meat' of the book is just over 350 pages, so that's a fair ratio). It is similar to Brain-based Therapy with Adults: Evidence-based Treatment for Everyday Practice and A User's Guide to the Brain. In-depth reviews of this book can be seen on Amazon.com.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Dissolving the boundaries between the art and science of therapy., 26 April 2011
For me this is a land-mark book. Among the many insights to be gained from neuroscience which are presented here, there is much that chimes with the empirical wisdom of all schools of psychotherapy. Cozolino manages to weave together the lessons of experience and observation from his practice with the neuroscience which underpins what is going on in the therapeutic relationship. His book is informative, taking the reader deep into the emerging literature on neuroscience, sometimes moving (in his stories of therapeutic encounters) and always clear and well-written. The thinking is rigorous but the warmth and humanity of the author is also much in evidence and I don't think therapists and trainee therapists (like myself) should be put off by the daunting title. The chapters are well constructed in relatively short, focused sections. Those wishing to follow up with further reading will find 76 pages of references to guide them.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Informative, 13 Mar 2012
The second edition is a useful update on a good description of the emerging body of work which seeks to inform psychotherapy with developments from neuroscience. Cozolino's other book on relationships is also well worth consideration. Daniel J. Siegel's work is similar in scope, if sometimes slightly more populist in tone. Both authors are well liked by my undergraduate students in counselling - readable, suffeciently in depth and informative.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Enjoying neuroscience., 18 Dec 2012
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Cozolino writes in a scientific but clear understandable way. This is the second book I have read of his, I hope he writes more. He links modern scientific discovery with previous existing psychology theories in readable manner. Suitable for students of psychology and psychotherapy as well as those with an interest in neuroscience.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating and enlightening, 23 May 2012
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Roald Andresen (Skien Norway) - See all my reviews
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Readable and interesting - even for scolars from other fields of science.
My understanding is that both neuroscience and psychoterapy are fields of science where conjectures are a neccessity - there are no final proofs. Furthermore, the interrelation of these two fields is in its infancy. The author makes a good - and as far as I can see - an up-to-date description of the state-of-the-art.
Real life cases makes this book easy to relate to situations that the reader can recognise (either from own experiences or from the experiences of friends and family).
A most useful insight into the intricate workings of the brain and the damages it may suffer.
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4.0 out of 5 stars great book, 23 Feb 2014
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This review is from: The Neuroscience of Psychotherapy: Healing the Social Brain (Second Edition) (Norton Series on Interpersonal Neurobiology) (Kindle Edition)
Great read, well researched and written. Good for anyone wanting to do research into psychotherapy. Not many books out there covering this topic...see Gross' 'emotion regulation'
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4.0 out of 5 stars Great book, 6 Feb 2014
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Very in-depth and informative. A must for practitioners. I have a real interest in Neuroscience and found this book much easier to follow than most.
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9 of 20 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Waste of a good tree, 22 Jun 2010
By 
L. Fitzgerald (Dublin, Ireland) - See all my reviews
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The author piles conjecture upon conjecture, and seems to think that repeating that process often enough conveys the authority of a scientific proof. It doesn't. The text is also littered with complex sentences that don't mean anything. Accordingly, I find some difficulty in believing the conclusions he draws.
I'm sorry I bought this book.
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