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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Dario Argento classic
Tenebrae, unbelievable Graphic horror for it's time released back in 1981
bit more Graphic than some of the U.S. Horror films released at the same time.
the whole film is in English but there are couple actors I noticed there dialogue dubbed in English
but it's an Italian Horror film so what do you expect, so most of the film is in English language...
Published 9 months ago by Ben30

versus
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Eureka, ignore sub titles and buy the Wild Side release
I have commented on this release before but having just watched the Wild Side (Universal) label release (bought from Amazaon France), I thought I should speak once more. The downside of the French release is that subtitles are automatically displayed (unless watching in French!) and you cannot deselect them on a standard blu ray player (but they are not burned on). I...
Published 22 months ago by A M Jones


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Dario Argento classic, 9 July 2013
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This review is from: Tenebrae [DVD] [1985] [1982] (DVD)
Tenebrae, unbelievable Graphic horror for it's time released back in 1981
bit more Graphic than some of the U.S. Horror films released at the same time.
the whole film is in English but there are couple actors I noticed there dialogue dubbed in English
but it's an Italian Horror film so what do you expect, so most of the film is in English language anyway
but that is Italian Horror.

I have the U.S. Anchor bay release of this film aswell which is definitely UNRATED
both this region 2 version and the U.S. version are both UNCUT in my opinion
I am a big fan of this film so the only reason I have both versions is cause the special features/extras are different
the U.S extras are different to the U.K. extras

the special features you get that are different to the U.S. Anchor bay version
are
Daria Nicolodi interview, Dario argento interview and music composer Cluadio simonetti
all in Italian with English subtitles unfortunately
you also get a Goblin performance of them playing the music these from Tenebrae and Phenomena
and an audio commentary by Argento experts Kin newman , Alan jones

the U.S. Anchor bay version is UNCUT aswell and it beautiful widescreen format
,so it is up to you what version you want to buy.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Eureka, ignore sub titles and buy the Wild Side release, 28 May 2012
By 
A M Jones (West Midlands, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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I have commented on this release before but having just watched the Wild Side (Universal) label release (bought from Amazaon France), I thought I should speak once more. The downside of the French release is that subtitles are automatically displayed (unless watching in French!) and you cannot deselect them on a standard blu ray player (but they are not burned on). I didnt find them distracting but you should be aware. Watching this edition of Tenebrae has made me appreciate how dire the Arrow release is. The picture displays a good balance of colours as I would have expected them to be (with prominence towards browns, whites, reds). The picture is also sharp and displays good depth. Sound is good, but still does not display exceptional fidelity. Comparing this back against the Arrow edition, there is no fizzing of the images as on the Arrow edition (I dont know but I am beginning to wonder of there was a lot of processing applied to the master of the Arrow edition which just did not work?) possibily as a result of edge enhancement or perhaps an attempt to digitally sharpen the image (I'm no technician) - you can even see Peter Neal's face clearly in the opening sequences. The balance of colour is off too, green's/foliage should not have appeared with the same searing strength of colour as, say, the reds. Every now and again there is a suggestion of detail in the image (look at reflections in glass), but this is inconsistent as the Wild Side release demonstrates with textures in backgrounds (the texture of masonry/plaster). I really cannot overstate how good the Wild Side release is - the difference is like looking out of the window through a net curtain (Arrow) and then lifting it aside. Blu Ray is here to showcase the best quality of film exhibition available in the mass market. To provide something which falls short of the standard I know is possible with this Argento classic is, quite frankly, insulting. For fear of treading over old ground, Arrow must have been aware that the HD copy made available to them was sub standard. If that was the case they should have refused to proceed with the release until the issue was resolved. Watch the Wild Side edition and appreciate what a mis step the Arrow release has been.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Breaking the deepest taboo..., 14 Feb 2014
Successful American writer Peter Neil travels from New York to Rome to promote his new best-seller Tenebre.

He is received by his agent Bullmer who schedules an interview in a talk show.

As soon as Peter arrives, there is the murder of a shoplifter and Detective Germani is assigned to the case.

He meets Peter and tells that the killer was inspired by his novel to commit the crime. Peter receives a letter from the murderer and two more are murdered.

The killer writes that perverts must be eliminated and Peter suspects of the host of his show.

However, when you eliminate the impossible, whatever remains might be the truth...

One of the supposed video nasties of the eighties, this film has such rich visual flair, that it's more operatic than horror.

Argento was at his peak with this movie,and he hasn't made a film as prolific as this since. It has a lot in common with 'crystal plummage' with the POV of the killer, and as always, Argento, shows the female in a very erotic manner, thus showing the killer getting some sort of sexual kick from it.

Performances are good, and the ending is very shocking, but for the visual flair and camera-work, this has to be one of his greatest achievements.
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5.0 out of 5 stars classic gallio, 7 Feb 2014
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This review is from: Tenebrae [Blu-ray] (Blu-ray)
Have had this on video tape DVD and now Crystal clear bluray. Argento classic whole host of fantastic extras brilliant
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5.0 out of 5 stars The joy of execution, 14 Jan 2014
By 
Rob Simpson "noframeof" (Middlesbrough, England) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Tenebrae [Blu-ray] (Blu-ray)
My first ever Giallo.

Its quite bizarre to learn it was labelled as one of the video nasties, compared to the gore and depravity that some of those titles had Tenebrae comes across as tame. While the story isn't anything new, the subtext that Argento has in using this as a vehicle to retaliate to claims levelled towards him as well as reacting to an obsessed fan gives it all an edge. That dog chase scene though, wow.

Where it really landed for me was in the execution. The score by Goblin instantly became one of my favourites, both instantly memorable and brooding with lashings of atmosphere. Same goes for Luciano Tovoli's camerawork, its calm and rational when it needs to be but when the murder scenes come around he zips about with aplomb complimenting the erratic energy of the score. Execution is everything here and its a utter joy to watch.

I think I'll be looking into what more Giallo and Italian Horror has to offer.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Arrow Blu Ray - disappointing quality of transfer, 9 Nov 2013
By 
Stephen E. Andrews "Writer" (United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Tenebrae [Blu-ray] (Blu-ray)
This review is aimed at those of you who have already seen 'Tenebrae', wondering about the quality of the blu ray transfer.

After being absolutely stunned by the Arrow blu ray of 'Zombi 2' (aka 'Zombie Flesh Eaters') - it was like watching a different film when compared to every other version I've seen (from the Vipco VHS -say no more - to the US DVD entitled 'Zombies'), I felt confident enough to give Arrow's version of 'Tenebrae' a go, despite some negative comments here about the disc.

I originally saw 'Tenebrae' theatrically when it was first released, owned a VHS, then later a Medusa DVD imported from Italy. The latter was fairly unimpressive. In my opinion, there is no reason why 'Tenebrae' should not look great on BD - though comments about Italian standard transfers do seem relevant here. But the BD of 'Suspiria' is gorgeous and imagine what a challenge the intense colours of thqt film were for visual engineers - and a quick glance at Arrow's BD of 'Inferno' (which I've not looked at in detail yet, admittedly) made me nod with satisfaction.

Another reviewer notes how clear the second scene (Peter Neale - played by Anthony Franciosca - cycling to the airport) is. This is true, it looks great - however, there is a really noticeable dip in quality as soon as we cut to the first interior scene at the airport itself, the picture is full of noise. This continues pretty much throughout.

'Tenebrae' is a very light film - even the night scenes are very bright, which makes for an interesting contrast with 'Suspiria' and 'Inferno'. This lightness suits both the early 80s fashions and Argento's comment that the film is set in a future that is less populous and therefore more affluent - although the mis-en-scene arguably implies this, nowhere in the film is it stated that the story is set in the future, rendering a categorisation of the film as Science Fiction as inadmissible (shame, as this would have made 'Tenebrae' even more interesting and might have prevented the film from 'dating' for those sad individuals who can't understand that things are of their time and that films are not immediately below par if they weren't made 3 minutes ago and don't look the same as everything else that has been released in the last 10 minutes). Sadly, the very brightness of 'Tenebrae' means that picture noise is every bit as visible as it is in a darker film and it's very distracting, especially when one can see that the overall picture is much clearer than any DVD issue. 'Tenebrae' should look pristine, I'm afraid, Arrow...

I'm concluding that either Arrow didn't have great material to work with, or that they've simply botched it. I've not yet seen any overseas BD releases of 'Tenebrae', but as far as I'm concerned, I'm not satisfied with this release at all. Shame, as there are some nice extras, though the commentary sees Newman is particularly detractive mood, continually pointing out the highly unlikely elements in the plot (which we're all aware of, but can suspend disbelief so easily since this is such a great film, whereas some later and very early Argento features expect too much of us) being a bit more schoolboyish than usual- Alan Jones is as 'on it' as ever re Argento as ever, revealing some fascinating details about the film. Shame the commentary didn't have a more objective moderator alongside Jones, though I do agree with Newman that 'Tenebrae' was the last truly great film from Argento.

One treat is the excerpt from a recent Goblin gig, which makes me want to buy their 2 disc DVD (if you've not heard the 'Live in Roma' double CD attributed to new Goblin, just buy it).

Finally, the film seems uncut as far as I can tell, which is great news, but if you're thinking 'that's it, I now have a definitive hi def version of 'Tenebrae'', you'll be disappointed. HOWEVER, the good news is that Arrow have tackled these problems and are issuing a new Steelbook edition of 'Tenebrae' late in 2013 (available exclusively from Zavvi) - this upgraded transfer has apparently eradicated the noise on the picture (I've heard this from an informed insider). Presumably, once the 4,000 copy run of the steelbook is exhausted, Arrow may reissue the improved transfer in a standard edition. Fingers crossed!
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4.0 out of 5 stars Well, I liked Arrow's blu-ray., 15 Sep 2013
By 
A. Moncrieff (up your a s s) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Tenebrae [Blu-ray] (Blu-ray)
I put off buying this BD disc for a long time because the reviews for it were so negative and it was never my favourite Argento film (it's in the second tier of solid but undistinguished classics), so I was content to keep with my Anchor Bay DVD which had extras I knew weren't on here anyway.

After finally picking the disc up, I have to wonder what the problem is. I think the film looks great. The problem everyone cites is this "scanner noise" issue, which should be familiar to those who collect classic Italian films on blu-ray. City of the Living Dead, from Arrow and Blue Underground, is the worst offender since, as a 16mm film, the grain was the size of live maggots dancing on your TV...even then I still enjoyed the HD presentation. Both releases of Django suffer from it. Another example is Mill Creek's Spaghetti Western Double Feature blu-ray of The Grand Duel and Keoma, in which Keoma was presented in a similar manner. This is an unusual and, yes, not ideal presentation, but it's lead to all kinds of wild accusations from amateur videophiles - that it's an "upscale" (why did we teach them this word?), that it's had an egregious amount of DNR applied and 'fake grain' added...The latter is a particularly baffling claim when one examines these discs for the tell-tale signs of detail depth - hair, clothing textures, unpolished wood surfaces. Tenebrae, like Keoma and City... does include a lot of depth. I have no idea why this strange look occurs, but it's not nearly as dramatic as others lead me to believe. Tenebrae was not by any means a chore to get through - the colours were vivid and strong, depth and detail astonishing...I watched it the same day as Mulholland Drive (Studio Canal Collection) [Blu-ray Region B] [2001], which has unanimously good reviews, and that has many distracting vertical lines running up it for the first hour and a half (that is, the portion shot for TV), from film grain. I found that A LOT harder to ignore...here I didn't even have to try.

On the audio side, I've never loved the music for this film. The Goblin camp switching to disco instead of rock was not exactly a smart move in my book and the score has always sounded...grey and dull. This disc doesn't change that, and lacking a 5.1 I felt a little cheated before watching it because I did enjoy the remix done for the Anchor Bay disc. However, I have to commend Arrow for including a PCM 2.0 Stereo mix rather than a Dolby Digital DTS-HD MA 2.0, because it allows my 5.1 unit to use that Pro Logic II thing and make a pretty effective surround sound out of it, which it can't with the DTS-HD MA 2.0 tracks. It sounded great - another win.

The extras, which I do miss the Anchor Bay ones (keeping my dvd too), adds a lot of great stuff - interviews with Dario (who claims, perhaps jokingly, that Tenebrae takes place after World War 3 when half the population has died!), Daria Nicolodi (who also does a very brief intro, as on the Inferno disc), Claudio Simonetti, trailer, an endearingly middle-aged performance by Goblin in Glasgow of the themes from "Tenebrae" and "Phenomena" and commentaries by Thomas Rostrock and by Kim Newman and Alan Jones, the latter who also contributes the liner notes. The usual reversible cover is included, but I miss the one with the slit-throat. The original art here looks like a vague smear of white on black. Oh well, the Arrow art is pretty good too.

As for the film, it's Dario's return to giallo thrillers after two supernatural outings with career highlights Suspiria and Inferno. I'd put it on par with Deep Red, but not as good as Four Flies on Grey Velvet (it lacks a significant fright factor as that film had, but shares good shock-moments with Deep Red). The bright visual colour-scheme, looking like De Palma's Scarface, Miami Vice, Logan's Run and The Bird With the Crystal Plumage in a blender, is a stroke of genius - Dario and company reinventing their aesthetic once again! Even though Tenebrae was one of my first Argento films, I would not say it was a great introduction - The Bird with the Crystal Plumage, Four Flies on Grey Velvet, Suspira and Inferno are top takes. Tenebrae belongs in the second-fiddle, with The Cat O Nine Tails, Deep Red and Opera. None the less - highly recommended.
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5.0 out of 5 stars "..COOL ARGENTO THRILLER..", 5 May 2012
By 
S. Drury "SDX-800" (U.K) - See all my reviews
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This is another who did it thriller from the master Dario Argento, its a great story as always with a killer on the loose and you never guess what happens until the big twist at the end, its not Argento's best but still good to have in the collection, some quality camera work and creepy music make it a classic still. The cast is good including a small part by John Saxon from a nightmare on elm street, there is some bloody gore as usual as expected from Argento, if your a fan then its a must in the collection.
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14 of 19 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Great film...Poor Print, 2 July 2011
Im going to make this short and sweet...This is a great/amazing Argento flick, That has had it's face shoved in the mud by ARROW VIDEO!!! It's like watching the film through frosted glass...moving frosted glass! Final Words...Arrow please fix up or it's Blue-underground from now on.
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8 of 11 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars not the best blu ray transfer!!!, 28 Jun 2011
yet again arrow have released a sub standard blu ray transfer.the picture quality of tenebrae is really poor.there are times when the picture is clear,but more often than not,the picture is fuzzy and grainy and not the kind of quality you expect from blu ray.arrow films need to take a long hard look at the products they are releasing and then they simply need to try harder with the quality of transfers they are providing customers.this is a great film,that has not been given the blu ray transfer that it deserves.it is only just worth the upgrade from the dvd,but if you are a fan of this movie,then you will probably upgrade regardless of my review.cat o' nine tails is next for the arrow blu ray treatment,so let's hope they get it right with that release,although i expect that there will be problems with that release too.come on arrow and pull your finger out or you might not be in business much longer.
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Tenebrae [DVD] [1985] [1982]
Tenebrae [DVD] [1985] [1982] by Veronica Lario (DVD - 2011)
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