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The Sorcerer's Apprentice [DVD] [2010]
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83 of 87 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon 5 October 2010
The Sorcerer's Apprentice is a daft but fun and extremely enjoyable family fantasy movie. Nicolas Cage and Alfred Molina are very over the top, in fact they both seem to be having a competetion of who can out ham each other. Molina wins, he's practically twirling his moustache as the villain, but looks like he's having fun making the movie as does Nicolas Cage who seems to be on a comeback this year. Special effects are very good, and there's a fun sequence that pays as a homage to Disney's Fantasia involving some brooms. Jay Baruchel is good in the title role, coming across kind of like Shia Lebeouf did in the first Transformers film. I'd like to see a sequel to this film as the film is left open for the possibility of one. The whole family should enjoy this. While it's not exactly the most original movie you'll ever see, if you like Harry Potter movies and enjoyed Percy Jackson And The Lightning Thief then you should enjoy this.
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29 of 31 people found the following review helpful
on 18 October 2010
This movie has it all---magic, mythical creatures, great special effects, a captivating tale, romance, as well as the quintessential Disney charm. If you're going in thinking you'll be seeing Mickey Mouse, clear your mind. This is live action and filled with Disney magic. Nicholas Cage delivers a fantastic performance as Balthazar Blake, a sorcerer personally trained by Merlin. Balthazar has spent the last millenium seeking for the one person that is capable of riding the world of the evil Morgana and her threat of overtaking the world with her undead minions. His quest leads him to a normal, everyday (Bless you Disney) geek, Dave Stutler(Jay Baruchel). Dave's a whiz kid that comprehends physics with a skill that makes me want to be his study partner in class, and is more than a little klutzy. Goodness, watching him in his office made me want my own Tesla Coil!

When our unlikely pair meet in 2000, poor 10 year old Dave accidently breaks open a coveted nesting doll that contains the evil persona of Maxim Horvath (Alfred Molina). How much more can a man be described as evil when his human body forms from a mass of slithering cockroaches? Ten years later, Horvath is seeking to destroy Dave, discovering he is the one individual capable of bringing an end to any plans of world domination.

The battle of good vs. evil is on but, first, Dave has to learn how to perform the magic that remains hidden deep within him. Reluctant, falling in love, and lacking self-confidence, Dave is a darling that makes the viewer laugh, groan in commiseration, and clap with glee when he succeeds. Balthazar is the teacher that makes one shake their head, wondering where he gathers so much patience with what appears to be a hopeless case. Harvath is slick, disgusting, but delivers an age-old charm that makes your skin crawl.

Overall, this is a good family movie. It's a bit too in-depth for the younger set, but those between the ages of 10-16 will find it enjoyable. Our audience clapped with enjoyment and laughed with the characters throughout the movie, as only true Disney fans will do. I enjoyed it, as did the kids, enjoying the clean family fun and magic that Disney always delivers. Remember to stay for the ending credits, producer Jerry Bruckheimer and director Jon Turteltaub are notorious for those little teasers they place at the end of the flick.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 31 May 2012
When I first heard that Disney was `remaking' the Sorcerer's Apprentice (the five minute animated sequence from Fantasia) into a live-action feature length movie, I did wonder how they could stretch out a relatively simple plot into a whole film, but then I saw it was produced by Jerry Bruckheimer, who managed to spin four films out of the Pirates of the Caribbean theme park ride.

The initial prologue takes place during Medieval times and shows the relationship between the three sorcerers, Balthazar (Nicholas Cage), Horvath (Alfred Molina) and Veronica (Monica Bellucci) and their master, Merlin. Horvath, jealous of Balthazar and Veronica's relationship betrays them with Merlin's nemesis, Morgana, who Veronica sacrifices herself to entrap in a prison, which Balthazar protects until he can find the chosen one who is prophesied to destroy the witch, Morgana.

The film then cuts to present-day, which surprised me as I expected it to be something of a Medieval epic, so seeing the bulk of the story take place in modern times was interesting. Balthazar comes across his chosen one and tries to train him as his apprentice, in preparation for the final battle against the witch, Morgana.

Considering the story was influenced by the Mickey Mouse animated sequence in Fantasia, there isn't much reference to it apart from a brief enjoyable scene involving the mops, brooms and water. The storyline is surprisingly watchable, and feels like a post-modern Harry Potter, although it doesn't have the same charm and rich universe to launch its own franchise to compete with those movies.

Nicholas Cage puts in a good performance as Balthazar, with some wry one-liners and amusing visual jokes. He seems confident in his role as Sorcerer and most of the way through the film, I was thinking `how comes he isn't the chosen one himself' since he had a better grip on his powers compared to Dave, his apprentice. Alfred Molina, who spends his time searching for the Russian-doll prison that keeps his mistress trapped, is a very watchable villain, managing to give a nice air of menace about the film, despite its Disney roots. The weakest factor is the character of Dave himself, played by Jay Baruchel, who seems to be unconvincing as the reluctant apprentice and looks far too old for the part of a 20-year old with quite noticeable stubble in places.

The special effects are impressive, as are the choreographed action scenes. Watching experienced Sorcerers such as Balthazar and Horvath flinging spells at each other and attempting to outsmart each other with various traps and prisons is very enjoyable to watch. Unfortunately, the final battle seems to be less energetic than the previous ones but it is still enjoyable to watch.

While I doubt there will be a sequel to this film, it is a very enjoyable family film and shouldn't really be judged on-par with the Fantasia animated short that it shares its name with. I would recommend it to fans of the other Jerry Bruckheimer productions, such as the Pirates of the Caribbean or National Treasure series. Fans of Harry Potter may like this, but find it lacking in comparison to the expansive universe and complex storytelling of that franchise.
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25 of 28 people found the following review helpful
TOP 500 REVIEWERon 6 December 2010
The Sorcerer's Apprentice is just a really nice fun for all the family movie, a mixture of magic & science. The film follows the opening storyline setting of Merlin and his 3 apprentices, of whom best friends Balthazar Blake (Nicolas Cage -Con Air) & Maxim Horvath (Alfred Molina -Spider-Man 2) are divided by a love feud between each other in the shape of the 3rd apprentice, Veronica (Monica Bellucci -Malena). However Maxim Horvath cannot win Veronica's heart from Balthazar Blake, so thus he turns against Merlin & joins forces with the evil Morgana (Alice Krige -Star Trek First Contact) to defeat Merlin & Blake in order to have Veronica by force.

However in the ensuing battle, Merlin is slain & Blake alongside Veronica manage to defeat Maxim & Morgana by trapping Morgana inside Veronicas body, and the both of them togher bound inside an object(a Russian doll?). The only way Blake can free Veronica & finally slay Morgana(who wants to take over the World) is to find another gifted Sorcerer's Apprentice & train them for battle. Now, after 1000 years of searching around the World, the Sorcerer's Apprentice purely by chance, stumbles across Blakes path at long, long last!

That is what the story is all about, and has now moved on to a modern day New York. I really enjoyed the imaginative idea's used in combination with the magic, many memorbale set pieces, and Disney fans who enjoyed Fantasia will love the scene where Dave uses his magic to get the mops etc... to clean with, like Mickey Mouse. All the actors did a very god job in they're respective roles, of note Nicolas Cage managed to control the crazy inside him enough to give a solid tongue in cheek yet serious, Con Air, style performance which suited well(he looked in great shape too). While Alfred Molina reprised one of his his usual evil villian roles to a tee. New to me was Jay Baruchel (How To Train Your Dragon), who plays the Sorcerer's Apprentice of the title, Dave, and does a good job as a bumbling student who lacks confidence after an unfortunate incidnet in his early life. Although he does sound a little like Adam Sandler on hellium in places, it's quirky though & i liked it, as it suited the character's flaws perfectly.

In conclusion, the story, acting & special effects all rolled into one, manage to bring this film to life as an highly enjoyable fantasy film. The music is upbeat too, so if you are looking for a film to sit down with the whole family & watch these upcoming Holidays, The Sorcerer's Apprentice, is right on the money for all ages. Highly reccomended.
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39 of 44 people found the following review helpful
The Sorcerer's Apprentice is a glorious romp of a movie.

The plot, such as it is, is pretty straightforward. Merlin has a fantastic battle against Morgana and imprisons her in a magical doll. His apprentice Balthazar has to search across the ages for Merlin's descendant who is the only one who can finally defeat Morgana and save the world.

The story moves on to contemporary New York where we meet Dave, the unlikely physics nerd who just might be our saviour.

Balthazar and Dave are pursued by Horvath another apprentice who has gone over to the dark side.

And that's about it really. It is a very entertaining action adventure with great special effects set against the Manhattan scenery. The performances are excellent. Alfred Molina makes a great villain. Normally I'm not a Nicholas Cage fan but in this instance his wild eyed manic approach is actually perfect for the part.

The action is great and the myth making does not intrude too much. There is also some nice comedy, particularly a lovely scene which is a pastiche or homage to the Sorcerer's Apprentice sequence from Fantasia.

This film is excellent for all of the family, but could be a wee bit scary for very small children. There is nothing very original here (the influence of Harry Potter, Indiana Jones and even the Sword in the Stone being all too apparent) but this is a couple of hours of good old fashioned excellent entertainment.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
You've got to know your career's gone down the toilet when you release a film that hits all the checkmarks necessary to be viewed as acceptable, but nothing more, and this registers as one of the better films that you've made recently. Alas though, this is the situation that Nicolas Cage has found himself in. He doesn't have to make something extraordinarily groundbreaking. He doesn't even have to make something great, because whenever he finds himself involved in something that isn't terrible, it seems like a triumph, not just for him, but also for the audience. An audience who can breathe a sigh of relief that they are not about to sit through another "Cage dud". Another Next. Or another Knowing. Or another Ghost Rider. Or another Justice.

Or another Ghost Rider 2.

Whenever Cage works with director Jon Turteltaub, we seem to get perfect examples of this. Turteltaub is a serviceable commercially-orientated director, although he has a horrible habit of switching on directing autopilot. Previously, he and Cage made the National Treasure films together. Though I'm yet to see the second of those films, I remember quite enjoying the first one only to like it less upon a second viewing, something that I put down to repeated viewings lessening the relief of not having to sit through another of Cage's turgid excursions into ignominy. The Sorcerer's Apprentice is a bit of a different story. It begins fairly well, with the relief setting in that it's not going to be too awful. As time passes though, things start to unravel and the positives only lie in the absence of true negatives.

Using that bit from Fantasia, The Sorcerer's Apprentice puts the 'based' in based on. Cage plays Balthazar Blake, one of Merlin's three protégées. In the battle against Merlin's arch nemesis Morgana Le Fay (Alice Krige), Merlin and Blake are betrayed by their ally, Horvath (Alfred Molina). While Morgana manages to kill Merlin, the betrayal doesn't work out too well for Horvath as he finds himself locked inside a nesting doll. However, the only way to stop Morgana is for the other protégée, Veronica to absorb her into herself. With Morgana killing Veronica from inside, Balthazar is forced to place her in the doll with Horvath. He then embarks on a quest to find the Prime-Merlinian, a foretold individual who will take Merlin's place as the one man who can rid the world of Morgana. Cut to present day, where Jay Baruchel's path will cross with Balthazar's and his potential destiny as the Prime Merlinian is discovered. When he accidentally releases Horvath back into the world, this is a destiny that he must come to terms with fairly quickly. What, however, is this foretold saviour's name? Whom will the legends tell of as the successor to Merlin's name?

That would be Dave. I mean, really. They could have called him Mickey, won points from the "Based on" department and it would have still sounded a better wizard name than Dave. If only slightly better.

With that in mind, how, you may ask, does this tie in with the famous section from Fantasia? Well, there's a scene where various cleaning products come to life and Dave can't keep them in control. It lasts about five minutes. There's also a ten second shot of a blue wizard's hat with white stars on it, after the credits. I could go on, but I fear it may start to appear as though the filmmaker's were clutching at straws and, of course, this is not the case at all.

The film's biggest problem is that while it has it's concept and presents itself fairly confidently to begin with, it then realises that the ending is in sight and hasn't got much idea how to fill the time in between. Failing to realise this, it presents us with countless training scenes, interspersed with Dave getting into trouble, only for Balthazar to come and rescue him and a love story that practically defines trite. Instead of realising this and getting things over with quickly, it spreads out what should be a 90 minute film (at most) to nearer 2 hours. The jokes are few and will rarely conjure up (pun wasn't intended, but I'm sticking with it) little more than a wry chuckle and the big set pieces are either short and pointless or yawn-inducingly pedestrian fare.

The script also has a horrible habit of writing itself into a corner with no idea of how to get itself out of them. Horvath is set up as a true villain. His actions will result in the death of millions and he doesn't care, but the script presents situations where he has the upper hand and retreats with no real reason. He even abandons sure-fire opportunities to kill both Balthazar and Dave, abandoning these with just as little reason. There's no suggestions of a developing humanity in the character. It instead just feels like Lex Luthor trapping Superman in a Kryptonite mine-shaft, only to throw him some rope. Moments like these are what rewrites were designed for and they should have never passed the continuity tests.

So far, so "Cage dud", but the film's real advantage lies in it's decent cast. A cast who are all capable of raising up the material. I'm including Cage in that. The common misconception is that he's a bad actor. He's not. He's a fantastic actor who has made some absolutely horrible choices and repeatedly fails to learn from those choices. He sees an electric fence, touches it and then decides to do it again a few times, just in case he imagined the consequences. That's not to say he's never delivered a bad performance because he has. It's just that a bad film doesn't require bad performances. It's like pre-2010 Matthew McConaughey. His films before that were torturous, but he was never, by any stretch, a terrible actor and he's proving that now. I'd love Cage to have a similar career resurgence and do think he's capable of it, but the doubt grows ever-increasing. At least here though, he's perfectly watchable and even enjoyable, adopting the Castor Troy mentality of overdoing it, but doing so in a fairly fun way.

Elsewhere, Baruchel is continuing with his intelligent outcast routine, but, unlike many of his fellow Apatow graduates, he's avoided over-exposure, meaning that he can still be enjoyable. On the feminine side of things, the Bechdel test's calling out in cries of anguish. Bellucci suffers most, as she's got bugger all to do. Criminal under-utilisation grows ever apparent as the story of Bellucci's Hollywood career. Teresa Palmer, on the other hand, is someone who I'm hoping will be propelled to greater things as a result of Warm Bodies. There is nothing in her character or the "geek-guy likes cool-girl" romance to help her in being anything other than the bland love interest, making her feel about as important as the background props. Palmer, however, is easy to warm to. Able to rise above just appearing for her natural attributes, she makes herself instantly likeable and her performance does it's best to make her feel human, while the script's just concerned about making men fancy her.

Then, we have Alfred Molina who flat-out steals the film as it's chief villain. There's a bit of Loki about him, in that he gets all the good lines and the film's at it's best when he's in it. However, regardless of the advantageous position, Molina just oozes menacing charm and is one of those actors who never appears to consider himself above the film that he's in. He always feels like he's trying to deliver his best performance, be that through pulling out the acting chops, or trying to keep things fun. While he's been in some terrible films (Prince Of Persia, Abduction), but I struggle to name a film in which he's ever been anything less than decent and, most of the time, he's exceptionally good. He's also more than capable of being the film's sole villain, begging the question of why they didn't let him be that. Instead, we get Toby Kebbell as Drake Stone, superstar magician and chief henchman to Horvath. There's nothing wrong with Kebbell in the role and it's not that the film doesn't try to provide the character with some point. It's that the way they instil that point is entirely perfunctory and it's an angle that also leads to the slightly pathetic addition of a well-known historical figure from witchcraft. The angle that justifies these characters' existence could have easily been removed, taking the characters with it, allowing us to simply sit back and bask in Molina's wonderfully fun villainy.

There's also the anticlimax of the ending, living up to the rest of the film by being everything you've seen before and nothing more. There's no tension, because nothing has made you believe that the norm will be strayed from. Worst of all, it completely sidelines Molina. Whilst it's essential to pull the focus away from him slightly, there's no call for the literal casting off that the character receives and their attempts to make up for this in the sequel-baiting post-credits sequence don't help, because as well as a sequel to this not being a particularly appealing prospect, the film (while not a complete financial disaster) made nowhere near enough money for us to ever think that sequels going to arrive.

It's my first film where I'm struggling to decide on the score, as it's the sort of film that the term "middle of the road" was invented for. It's a 2.5 out of 5, but I vowed to never resort to .5 scores as, let's be honest, how do you really distinguish between a 4 and a 4.5? The question, therefore, is which side of 2.5 I go. If you look at this as a Nicolas Cage film, it's a 3 on the basis of the aforementioned relief. That, however, would be to base the film on only one of it's many elements, a precedent that would open up a whole new dangerous world in which Two Weeks Notice gets a perfect 5, because it's not as bad a Hugh Grant film as Nine Months. In addition, I also feel that if the film deserved 3, I wouldn't be debating it, in the same way that I would never hand out a perfect 5 if I wasn't sure. The most positive thing I can say about The Sorcerer's Apprentice is that it's not entirely devoid of merit. At the same time, it is entirely devoid of true brilliance, no matter how close Alfred Molina comes.

TWO out of five
Contains infrequent examples of Cage's worst work, but equally infrequent examples of his best work.

P.S. Or another Windtalkers.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
The Sorcerer's Apprentice is directed by Jon Turteltaub and collectively written by Matt Lopez, Lawrence Konner, Mark Rosenthal and Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (poem). It stars Nicolas Cage, Alfred Molina, Jay Baruchel, Teresa Palmer, Toby Kebbel and Monica Belluchi. Music is by Trevor Rabin and cinematography by Bojan Bazelli.

Film is based on the Sorcerer's Apprentice segment in Disney's Fantasia. The plot finds Baruchel as a science geek who discovers he has hidden talents as a magician when ancient sorcerer Balthazar Blake (Cage) appears in modern day Manhattan. Unfortunately this also means as apprentice to Balthazar, he is thrust into doing battle against Maxim Horvath (Molina), a skilled sorcerer of old who has some devilish plans he wants to enact.

The Disney/Cage/Turteltaub combination once again deliver family friendly high jinx for the target audience. It's an engaging fantasy adventure that has some thought put into the script, it zips along thanks to Turteltaub's direction and it features some high energy action backed up by excellent special effects. Molina is having a great time of it, so too is Kebbell, who looks like he has wandered in off the set of Velvet Goldmine. Cage less so it seems, his moody broody approach is a small detriment to the picture's over all fun ethic. Film also lacks an emotional core, though it does try to amend briefly with a tween romance thread, but it's no major problem as this is countered with some lovely stabs of humour and nifty film references.

Fun family film, flaws and all. Not for the highbrow though, obviously. 7/10
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
I picked this one up for a fiver as part of a double-pack in Sainsburys with Prince of Persia (also reviewed) as an impulse buy and wasn't expecting too much.

For a start the back story is a pain to summarise but here goes. Merlin has three apprentices, the good, the bad and the beautiful -Nic Cage, Alfred Molina, and Monica Belluci. Alfred betrays Merlin to Morgan Le Fay who kills him. Monica traps the witch in her body. Nic puts them both in the smallest Russian Doll, adding other evil magicians to the next size doll up (including Bad Apprentice Alfred) in the course of 1300 years spent looking for the child who'll be Merlin's successor. Said (10 year old) child finally turns up in Nic's magic shop in New York following a note blown on the wind which will tell him if a classmate he has a crush on wants to be his friend or (giggle) his girlfriend. In the course of their encounter, Bad Alfred gets loose and he and Good Nic get trapped in a jar for ten years.

And that's just the opening. Ten years later our young hero has become a physics nerd and he meets the girl of his childhood crush at a physics lecture at the university he attends. At the same time, Nic and Alf get loose and the film gets going with a brisk blend of action and special effects. Nic is trying to train his young apprentice and keep his mind off romance while Alfred is busy trying to kill them both, free Morgan Le Fay and end the world. It all moves along very nicely and kept me happy for the duration. There's even a nice reworking of the rampaging broom sequence from Fantasia.

Minor quibble, the two juvenile leads are completely outshone by Nic Cage, even when underplaying by his standards, and Alfred Molina, sneeringly ruthless in manner and impeccably dapper in dress. Molina is brilliant in everything he does which is just about everything except maybe playing a romantic leading man and he does much to raise the quality of this film.

Maybe a little bit scary for small children but generally fun for everyone else.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 2 March 2011
I was expecting very little from this, as a film inspired by the Disney 'Mickey with dancing mops' scene in Fantasia. However, somehow I feel they've worked the same magic they did with Pirates of the Caribbean - turning a very very basic idea with no mileage into a hugely fun and rich film. It starts with a real 80's throwback moment - a kid stumbles across his destiny in a creepy old magic shop and it ends up being one of the worst days of his life. Ten years later, he's a college student and a geeky physics prodigy, trying to win the heart of the girl he lost in high school. As Dave, I was initially thrown by the casting of Jay Baruchel. Having gotten used to Hollywood casting conventionally good looking heroes, he came as a surprise with his intense geekyness and awkward looks. However, it enables him to play a vulnerable, awkward, and slightly comedic character in a truly fantastic way, and throughout the film 'Dave' opens up more and more to us until he begins to become the hero everybody wants him to be. It enables him to be a genuine underdog, and you really find yourself cheering him along in that old 80's adventure-movie way. The rest of the cast are terrific as well. Nicholas Cage is very good but reserved, happily losing some of his 'wild-man' schtick to play a more serious but interesting character. Alfred Molina is very good and occasionally surprisingly menacing as the main bad guy, with Toby Kebbell as an amusing and vain sidekick. The magic effects are truly brilliant, with fizzing electrical bolts, utterly convincing fire, and a plethora of fantastic tricks. It all feels much more vital and alive and dangerous than it does in most of the other magic films like the Harry Potter movies. There are some fantastic and unexpected beasties, and a few nice twists and surprises, as well as a heroine/love interest who gets to show a bit of faith in the hero for once and actually play more of a part than just being the simpering 'girlfriend' role.
It's exciting, fast, intruiging, funny and breathtaking.
It's everything I didn't expect it to be.
It's definitely going in my collection.
And I'd highly recommend it as one of the most exciting and enjoyable family adventure films of the year.
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful
on 18 August 2010
Nicholas cage is back on form!! It's been years in the coming but after years over over animated, manic characters it was great to see him play a controlled character to great effect. His apprentice, Dave, was like a skinny Ross Geller without much of the comic charm, I can't help feeling his affections would have made his love interest run a mile in real life.

The story was cliché'd, there was never any doubt how it was going to end, and `Dave' the hero seemed a little to old to convince, probably to justify his knowledge of Physics.

That said the movie was well paced, imaginative, packed with excellent effects/scenes and utterly engaging performances. The scene with the Chinese dragon was particularly strong. Took children from 5 - 12 and all thoroughly enjoyed.
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