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105 of 120 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "Like" Button
Like many people, I was actively resistant to the idea of watching a movie telling the story of Facebook. Smarmy frat-house brats high-fiving as they hunch around a computer screen with a few "brewskis" - becoming billionaires en route - sounded like a recipe for the most teeth-grindingly awful movie ever: Porky's for Dorks, if you will. I went reluctantly...
Published on 17 Oct. 2010 by Sarcosuchus

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3.0 out of 5 stars The Social Network
Didn't see this at the movies, it was on the list but then time ran out and other things just happened to be more important that seeing this. I find this is always the case in very "now" movies where you are not really seeing the end game/result, before the movie is released to capitalise on earnings.

The plot is well known so no need to go into it hear,...
Published on 23 April 2011 by Colin Gibson


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105 of 120 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "Like" Button, 17 Oct. 2010
Like many people, I was actively resistant to the idea of watching a movie telling the story of Facebook. Smarmy frat-house brats high-fiving as they hunch around a computer screen with a few "brewskis" - becoming billionaires en route - sounded like a recipe for the most teeth-grindingly awful movie ever: Porky's for Dorks, if you will. I went reluctantly.

Thank God I did though. I should have had more faith in David Fincher - he's a smart enough film maker to realise that this movie would only ever work if it focused on the genuinely extraordinary, which in this case means the birth of a new way of interacting, and the personalities that brought it into existence. This would be more than enough material to make an interesting film, but Aaron (West Wing) Sorkin's script also brings in issues of class, the generational divide, intelligence, money and the new economy. What results is a riveting, fast-paced film about the excitement of new ideas, the intoxicating rush of the succesful dot com, and the almighty high of billions of dollars, all channelled through something which all of us are familiar with and can relate to. Nothing less, then, than that rarest of beasts, a film which successfully addresses The Times In Which We Live.

The film's (already famous) opening scene shows Mark Zuckerberg (Jesse Eisenberg) being dumped by his girlfriend, and from this we immediately learn several key things - Zuckerberg is possessed of an unapologetic, almost Asperger's-level intelligence; and he is terrible at human interaction. Zuckerberg takes revenge on his ex online, by setting up a website enabling fellow Harvard students to rate female students by attractiveness, and while this stunt earns him an academic suspension, it also brings him to the attention of his peers, some of whom have ideas for websites of their own. And so begins the story of Facebook; Zuckerberg's vision, but possibly not his idea.

All the performances are remarkable, though the three main male leads - Eisenberg, Andrew Garfield, and Justin Timberlake - are nothing short of outstanding. Doubtless the real story was duller, more ragged and more painful, but in focusing on the emotional truth of the story Fincher and Sorkin have created a brilliant and entertaining fable for our times. Shame that women barely figure in it at all, apart from as heartless bitches or sex objects, but you can't have everything. Recommended.
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5.0 out of 5 stars BrownPolar Verdict, 17 Mar. 2015
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This review is from: The Social Network (Blu-ray)
Millions love being on the Facebook, but would as many be interested enough in the story of its creation and in the genius behind it to while away two hours in the cinema, despite all the orchestrated hype that Hollywood marketing machine generates for any film these days?

The answer would be a resounding no from many, particularly from the older generations, but they would be rewardingly surprised how exquisitely crafted, engaging, entertaining and intellectually satisfying ‘The Social Network’ is, thanks to a magnificent script from Aaron Sorkin and to another master class in filmmaking from David Fincher, one of the most creative directors of our time.

The key to its considerable success at the box office is largely attributable to the way the plot uncompromisingly oscillates between the past and the present, instead of just chronicling a story from its beginning to the end, thereby keeping the audience arrested and absorbed throughout.

Jesse Eisenberg, for the first time in a significant, leading role, delivers a superb performance as if he was born to play this character, while Fincher exacts commendable performances from the rest of the young talents, particularly from Justin Timberlake, who appears here to be in better control than in his previous appearances.

Above all, Sorkin and Fincher commendably achieve the perfect balance between portraying genius at work, which is the film’s premise, and the youthful melodramatics that carry the usual baggage of nerdy, technological jargon, so that the film is universally appreciable. ‘The Social Network’ is surprisingly funny in an intelligent way, although not as hilarious as the ‘Big Bang Theory’!

Finally, it is refreshing to see Sony Pictures getting behind a film that is worth talking about, instead of carrying on with the trash they usually file up at Columbia!

BrownPolar
September 2011
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4.0 out of 5 stars The Social Network, 30 Mar. 2011
By 
Spider Monkey (UK) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
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This review is from: The Social Network (2-Disc Collector's Edition) [Blu-ray] [2011] [Region Free] (Blu-ray)
When I heard Aaorn Sorkin was writing a film about Facebook I knew that whatever you may think about Zuckerberg, or Facebook itself, it would at least be well written and have superb dialogue. I was proven right.

This film chart Facebooks inception, its growth and the legal wrangling over it's ownership. Zuckerberg comes across as a narcissistic, arrogant, socially inept misfit, but also someone who happens to be extremely clever and able to take a basic idea and run with it. You see how he alienates all those around him, as well as betray those who believed in him and gave him ideas and support. It is quite sad to see and leaves a mild distaste in your mouth when you next go to logon to your Facebook account. You also feel slight pity for him and you have at least some understanding of what drives him and why he behaves the way he does.

This is acted well by all involved and Timberlake is a particular surprise as the cocky, self assured Sean Parker. It is also directed very well and the muted colours and dark lighting add a certain atmosphere to the proceedings. I was pleasantly surprised how interesting this was for the duration and what could be a rather staid and uninspired story is portrayed in an interesting and entertaining way. I credit Sorkin with a great deal of this success.

If you have a Facebook account (and to be honest, who doesn't these days), you may find this interesting and if you enjoy good drama, with snappy dialogue and credible acting then this is another reason to give this a watch.

Feel free to check out my blog which can be found on my profile page.
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5.0 out of 5 stars MASTERPIECE IN FILM MAKING, 21 Feb. 2011
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This review is from: The Social Network (2-Disc Collector's Edition) [Blu-ray] [2011] [Region Free] (Blu-ray)
So many times we hear about a great film and how it's the best thing ever! Only to be left so disappointed by yet another over rated movie, however The Social Network does not fall into that category, because yes the critics praise has been worthy, The Social Network is one of the best films to come along in quite a while!

The first thing to say is that this is not a film about Facebook, yes its based around its creators Mark Zuckerberg and Eduardo Saverin, but what it really is about is how their invention came between their friendship. The way the film is set up works really well as far as story telling goes, Mark Zuckerberg played by the brilliant Jesse Eisenberg is involved in 2 cases at once, one involving co creator Eduardo Saverin played by Andrew Garfield and the other case involves Cameron Winklevoss and Tyler Winklevoss who claim they asked Zuckerberg to design a social networking site for Harvard and claim that Zuckerberg took their idea. Eduard Saverin is also involved in that case.

It says alot for a movie that features a lot of dialogue that The Social Network never becomes confusing, boring or hard to follow. This is helped brilliantly by Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross amazing score for the film. Director David Fincher(seven, fight club, zodiac) really brings out the best in all the scenes and to listen to his commentary on the film is amazing.

The Blu Ray comes packed with extras such as Fincher's Commentary as well as screenplay writer Aaron Sorkin along with the cast. On disc 2 there's a brilliant feature called How Did They Ever Make A Movie of Facebook? Its over one and half hours long and shows a great insight on how they made the movie including the difficulties that they had to over come, it also show what a great director Fincher is. It shows him and Sorkin discussing what they think would work better in different scenes. You also get Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross talking about the creation of the award winning score and how tough it was to recreate "In The Hall Of The Mountain" for the famous Henley Royal Regatta scene, they include two versions, one that made the movie and an earlier version that didn't.

The Social Network is a film you will come back to watch more than once, it features a great cast even Justin Timberlake playing Napster Founder Sean Parker plays his role very well. It really is one of the best films to come along in a while and you will not be disappointed!
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3.0 out of 5 stars The Social Network, 23 April 2011
By 
Colin Gibson (England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
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This review is from: The Social Network (2-Disc Collector's Edition) [Blu-ray] [2011] [Region Free] (Blu-ray)
Didn't see this at the movies, it was on the list but then time ran out and other things just happened to be more important that seeing this. I find this is always the case in very "now" movies where you are not really seeing the end game/result, before the movie is released to capitalise on earnings.

The plot is well known so no need to go into it hear, flashbacks are used in many movies but they really work here. You quite often get oposing views in flashback ralative to who is telling that particular event, this means you have to make your own mind up as to who is telling the truth! Very much like the court you are sat listening into.

I have to say the central charactor did not 'warm' to me, I can understand the genious in him for his skills and forsight but as a person not someone I would like as a friend. Given that and the money he has generated I dont mind swallowing my pride and asking him back into my friendship circle!

For those into Facebook bigtime you will find this riviting stuff, for those like me who have an account but dont do anything serious on it - it's a passing really good insight into how ideas can make mega-bucks and a gripping tale of how something you use, started.

It has to be a must see movie just because it's a FACEBOOK movie!

Colin.
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2.0 out of 5 stars Starts off with an annoying conversation, 11 Aug. 2013
By 
bernie "xyzzy" (Arlington, Texas) - See all my reviews
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Once you get past the annoying conversation and through the credits and plan to settle on intriguing film of history and success, you will find to your chagrin a blasé pre-court give-and-take conversation, a long conversation, a monotone conversation, a dragged out conversation. It seems like hours of monologue with a dash of dialog thrown in. As the ending credits roll up you realize that all he did was talk and talk and talk.

Of course if you like long boring conversations this is a great movie and a perfect representation of one great big long diatribe that starts from nowhere and goes to nowhere. On the positive side the music was nice and the period costumes were up to acceptable.

I only saw the Blu-ray. I'm not sure they made anything other than Blu-ray. There are the standard scene selections, languages special features, and whatnot however none of them really contribute to this presentation. You might want to listen the audio commentary to see what they were trying to do.

Don't get me wrong I like history's I like biographies but this was really wasn't history or biography.
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4.0 out of 5 stars ‘the way is easy that leads to destruction’(Matthew 7:13), 3 Nov. 2014
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This review is from: The Social Network (2-Disc Collector's Edition) [Blu-ray] [2011] [Region Free] (Blu-ray)
‘The Social Network’ (2010) is a very good film but I’m surprised it hasn’t been crippled by a deluge of libel suits. Jesse Eisenberg is tremendous as the fast-talking, hyper-programming Mark Zuckerberg, the founder of Facebook. But is the real Mark so blinkered into effecting his own genius as the film portrays – even hinting that Mark is responsible for certain acts of base treachery? Is Sean Parker (played by Justin Timberlake) really the ruthless, manipulating hedonist as displayed in the film? Is Eduardo Saverin (played by Andrew Garfield) really the naive no-hoper displayed here? I’ve been working with computers for over 30 years (and somewhat over-awed by the ‘Young Turks’ of the Internet) but I really didn’t learn that much about the workings of Facebook. What I did get was a master-class in the nastiness of humans determined to get to the top regardless or, as the Bible puts it, gain the whole world but lose their souls. It’s a film that really leaves a bad taste in the mouth. One that I’ll visit again, because it’s very well made, but not very often. Worth 4 marks.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars top script, but a tad too long, 22 Dec. 2013
By 
tallmanbaby (Scotland) - See all my reviews
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This film has an uphill struggle against all the hype that surrounds it, with David Fincher and Aaron Sorkin on board this should be the Citizen Kane of our generation. Furthermore nearly three hours of cinema about unlikeable characters building an internet business would be a tough sell at the best of times.

The actual films is somewhere between the hype and one's worst expectations. Until about half way it is worthy and impressive, but frankly a little dull, around the point that Justin Timberlake appears as a superficially charming pantomime villain, Sean Parker of Napster fame, it clicks up a gear, and becomes genuinely far more gripping fare.

The film does fall short in a number of areas, Fincher is for the first time shooting exclusively on digital stock here, and the cinematography is proficient rather than amazing, the script has most of the best lines from any film that decade, but at nearly three hours this is a long haul of a film. There is a narrative arc of sorts, but this is achieved by creating a pantomime villain in Parker and allowing Zuckerberg to become vastly more likeable in the second half than we had any reason to expect in the first half.

So, is it close to reality, probably not, is it a great film, not entirely, is it worth a watch, pretty definitely particularly if you like talky films about geeks.
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23 of 29 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good film but SO over-rated, 15 Feb. 2011
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I saw this at the cinema and whilst it is an intriguing look into the birth of a global phenomenon that has caused us all to waste a lot of our precious time, it is just not an amazing film; but it is good.
The plot is essentially based around greed - everyone is trying to get a piece of the very big pie that was cooked up in various college kitchens; but the head chef (Zuckerberg) doesn't want to share the pie with anyone; even though his best friend paid for all of the ingredients.
Zuckerberg is undoubtedly the brains and passion behind "facebook" and he naturally deserves the lion's share of the profits generated by his hard work and imagination; but he is rather cold and dismissive of the role that others played and this makes it difficult to like him; he is very awkward which is typified in the opening scene in which his girlfriend quickly becomes his ex-girlfriend after Zuckerberg showcases his patronising charms. This rejection from his girlfriend fans the flames of Zuckerberg's creative computer geek-wizardry and he - like all great artists - uses his hurt to create something masterful. Whilst you feel for him to some extent, there isn't enough to like about him to enjoy his ride despite the exciting moments where he comes up with classic "facebook" features such as "relationship status" and "the wall".
Other characters are more engaging, especially Zuckerberg's best friend, Eduardo Saverin - played by the increasingly impressive Andrew Garfield; in fact all the performances are great including Justin Timberlake's rock 'n' roll portrayal of "napster" nerd, Sean Parker.
The film is good, but nothing amazing happens, the heart is not touched, it is hardly inspiring, none of the characters' inner journeys are fantastic enough to evoke empathy. The film is based on a true story so it is unrealistic to expect the plot or the characters to be close to perfect; but if a film is not truly inspiring, I personally disagree with it being lauded as great, regardless of how well it is made; like with music and art - it is surely about how it makes you feel?
It is very interesting and thought provoking but I cannot help but feel that a website called "facebook" is nominated for awards rather than a film called "The Social Network".
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Enjoy watching people use and talk about computers? You'll love this film!, 17 April 2011
By 
Tristan Martin (Hertfordshire, UK) - See all my reviews
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First off, I'm an admirer of much that David Fincher has directed, especially Fight Club and Zodiac; also, I'm a big fan of Aaron Sorkin's The West Wing. Consequently, I came to this film with high hopes. Unfortunately, this film just screams, "I'm clever! Acknowledge me!" for about two hours.

If you've ever been at a party where some obnoxious loudmouths are having a conversation about some "genius" website they frequent (and therefore by implication, that they, too, are pretty smart for using it) and you found this a pleasurable experience, then you might well enjoy The Social Network. It's not simply that the main character is portrayed as an annoying little git - films with unpleasant protagonists can be great - Oliver Stone's Salvador or Martin Scorsese's Raging Bull come to mind - but that the subject matter itself (Facebook? Seriously?) is so inherently dull. Sure, the writer Sorkin says The Social Network is actually about universal themes of friendship and betrayal yadda yadda yadda but there's no getting away from the fact that this is mostly about boring programmers and their myopic fixations on code.

This mostly fictional film uses the best production values that mainstream Hollywood can allow and it imbues a television issue-movie of the week with an overblown sense of self-importance. The photography, lighting, acting, soundtrack and the non-linear editing are all excellent and the script has it's moments too, particularly the legal sections but the whole is considerably less than the sum of it's parts.

When a director takes on challenging subject matter in an intelligent and subtle manner, such as Michael Mann's excellent The Insider, a film of true importance can be the end result. The Social Network, however, is the American equivalent of The King's Speech: well made but stultifyingly middlebrow.
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