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34 of 34 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant, inspiring story
Little Women by Louisa May Allcott
Little Women is a brilliant story set in America in the 1800s. Mr March has gone to war, leaving his penniless family at home: his wife, a caring and benovelent women who knows her daughters inside out, Meg, the eldest daughter who is mature and sensible of their situation, Jo, the daughter who longs to be a boy but trys her best to...
Published on 19 Sep 2003 by Miss Beret

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Poor quality
The novel itself is beautiful, charming, heart warming and an utter delight. Sadly, the kindle version is completely littered with errors. Many, many mistakes are consistent throughout, such as the mistyped comer where it should read corner and fall instead of full etc. Occasionally the word is so warped by errors that it is completely impossible to determine the meaning...
Published 22 months ago by Apostrophoebe


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34 of 34 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant, inspiring story, 19 Sep 2003
Little Women by Louisa May Allcott
Little Women is a brilliant story set in America in the 1800s. Mr March has gone to war, leaving his penniless family at home: his wife, a caring and benovelent women who knows her daughters inside out, Meg, the eldest daughter who is mature and sensible of their situation, Jo, the daughter who longs to be a boy but trys her best to get along with everyone, Beth, quiet but beautiful and who makes the tiniest thing seem like a great excitement and Amy, the youngest, naughty but loveable.
This book takes us through the joy and sadness of a poor family and you are drawn in from the first page. It is very inspiring as well as emotional and it is a lovely story.
I think it is suitable for ages 8+ and it is a brilliant read for both children and adults, especially if you like books set in olden times. An essential book for every collection. I give it 5/5.
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37 of 37 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars one of my ultimate favourite books of all time, 4 Nov 2005
There are hardly sufficient words to describe this book. Right from the start, you are taken into the hearts of the march family and helped to see their hopes, despairs and everyday life. Everyone can find a sister to identify with, and each character is so realistic it is hard to believe when you put the book down that they are not really with you, telling the story themselves. As a semi-autobiographical book, I have never read anything better.
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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Timeless Work Teaches Important Lessons for Today, 19 Aug 2006
By 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - See all my reviews
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Having not read Little Women in many decades, I was drawn back to the book by my love of visiting the Alcott family home, Orchard House, in Concord, Massachusetts. I plan to re-visit that wonderful home and want to refresh my recollections of Little Women before doing so. By the way, if you have a chance to visit Orchard House, I strongly recommend that you do. Your sense of Little Women will expand.

As I re-read these delightful pages, I found myself comparing Little Women to Pride and Prejudice, that outstanding work that captures human psychology so well. The comparison made me see new depths in Little Women that convince me that Little Women is by far the stronger work.

But my biggest reaction was how modern the views in the book are. Women should have education, access to opportunities to develop their interests and marriage to men who will complement them. People should be concerned about each other and help one another, lest any person's life be harmed or feelings hurt in the process.

I also noticed how complete a community of loving women can be within the same family.

The writing style is beautifully spare. The key point of a chapter may turn on two or three words. And then, everything changes in the twinkling of an eye.

Being a long book, Ms. Alcott has plenty of chances to develop her characters and she does so beautifully . . . allowing Meg, Jo, Beth, Amy and Laurie to grow and change as they age.

I also came to appreciate more the scope of the book, taking the young women from teenage years through the first few years of marriage. It's a time period that few books consider. Usually, it's all over when the marriage happens. I like this approach better.

Should you read Little Women? Does the sun rise in the East?

If you haven't read Little Women, you've missed great role models for how to be a parent, spouse and child.

Here's the story in a nutshell: During the Civil War, Mr. March is away serving as a chaplain in the Union army. Mrs. March (Marmee) and her four daughters are at home in the cold north making do on small income with the help of one servant, Hannah. As the story opens, the March family is facing a frugal Christmas. But events soon take an unexpected turn and their hearts are filled with gladness. Jo makes an unexpected and most humorous acquaintance of the Laurence boy (Theodore, known as Laurie) who lives next door with old Mr. Laurance, his grandfather. The two families draw upon one another for strength and friendships grow. Illness intercedes making the two families even more dependent on one another. One by one, the children move into adulthood, deal with their romantic feelings and form their alliances.

The characters of each child are quite different, allowing Ms. Alcott to explore the contrasts by putting them together in various private and social occasions. Meg is beautiful and much admired. She should attract many suitors. Jo is energetic, self-absorbed and talented in writing (the character closest to Ms. Alcott herself). Beth is very kind and yet fragile. Amy is the social climber in the family . . . and the pet. Laurie has an artistic temperament, but finds himself expected to play an heir's role.

You'll long remember with delight the stories of their thespian performances, games, dances and social visits. Although the book makes up a wonderfully detailed novel, the chapters are written almost as stand-alone short stories that pack a powerful punch in their modeling of good behavior.

What a joy!
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34 of 35 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "Little Women," An American Classic & A Superb Read!, 16 July 2005
I first read Louisa May Alcott's "Little Women" the summer between 4th and 5th grades. I was absolutely riveted by the story and characters and clearly remember sitting on the porch steps, my nose in the book. I cried when I reached the conclusion, because I was afraid that I had just read the best book in the world, and that I would never find anything else as good. The local librarian convinced me otherwise. I cannot recommend this novel highly enough - for people of all ages. It will always have a special place in my heart.
Ms. Alcott writes about four young women, living in New England, during a period of much strife in America - the Civil War. They are self sufficient, creative and well educated, and each chooses a different life path, traditional and non. Considering the period when the book was written, the author's views on opportunities open to females, restricted though they were by society, is refreshing and liberating. Of course, this was not my focus as a nine year-old. The novel is long, but that never bothered me as a young girl, or much later when I reread it. I didn't want the story to end, actually.
Sisters Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy March and their beloved Marmee, (who offers her daughters guidance, comfort and unconditional love), learn to live in genteel poverty while their father, a doctor, is away treating wounded soldiers. This beautifully written classic, chronicles the girls' adolescence through womanhood, with all their trial, tribulations, and joys.
Much of the novel focuses on Jo, the second daughter, and a gifted writer. She is very much a tomboy, and an avid reader who writes plays which the girls act-out with delight and exuberance. When they meet their new next-door neighbor, the wealthy, lonely Theodore Laurence, (called Laurie), they befriend him and invite him to become the only male member of their exclusive theater ensemble. Laurie becomes an important person in all of their lives, and the March family in his. Margaret, (Meg), the oldest, is quite lovely - a young woman with traditional values and tastes. Sensitive Elizabeth, (Beth), is the most fragile sister -quiet, caring and timid. And Amy, the youngest, is a gifted artist, with a tremendous sense of self-importance.
Together they cope with their father's absence and their fear for his safety, severe illness in the family, a death, lack of money precluding many of life's small luxuries, romance, love, marriage and many glorious adventures. In the second part of the novel, Meg marries, Jo's writing becomes a priority, as does Amy's art. During a time of impoverishment, they learn how good it feels to give to those who are much needier than themselves. This aspect of the book is very moving. Ms Alcott brings her characters to life on the page. All of them, even minor personages, are extremely well developed.
"Little Women" was first published in two parts in 1868 and 1869. The author drew from her own childhood experiences to dramatize the lives of the March family. The character "Marmee" is based on her own mother, Abigail May, (Abba), Alcott, whom she described as having: "A great heart that was home for all." Like Marmee, Abba was loving and passionate about women's rights, temperance, and abolition. A truly compelling and wise novel!
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39 of 41 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This is an absolutely brilliant book, 9 April 2001
By A Customer
After hearing about this book from a Tv programme and my family i thought what was all the fuss about. Then i read it and i knew straight away. This book sends out so many different emotions, in some chapters you can be laughing and in others you can be crying. This is why i loved the book so much. It tells the story about 4 sisters who go through different stages of their lives and who suffer and enjoy like everyone else in the world its not some fantasy story. I would recommend this book to everyone its a must read.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Super dose of nostalgia, 8 Nov 2009
By 
Mrs. K. A. Wheatley "katywheatley" (Leicester, UK) - See all my reviews
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As a child I read Little Women and its sequels repeatedly and loved them. Having to read it again for a course recently I wasn't sure if it would live up to my extremely fond memories. It did.

This is an excellent edition which combines the first two volumes, Little Women and Good Wives, along with a fascinating introductory essay. The notes are clear, simple and easy to understand and as a study edition I doubt that you could find better.

I still love the story of the four March sisters, flung into genteel poverty and trying their best to become the good little women of the title. Despite the fact that I was much more aware of the overtly moral sentiments of the text this time around it didn't detract from the lively characterisation, the humour and the fact that Alcott allows you to inhabit their world to such a degree that you are sad to leave by the end.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Amazing Read, 13 Dec 2004
By A Customer
I have just finished reading "Little Women" for English and it is an amazing read for all ages. It clearly and effectively indicates the struggle of women in the 19th century, while making it a funny, exciting and enjoyable read. Jo March, the protagonist, is a character that all women can relate to. She wishes to carry out her dreams while looking after her family. All of her adventures within this novel shows the struggle of a woman who is ahead of her time. This is a novel that I could not put down until the last page and would urge everyone to read it.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great Classic with an important message, 15 Feb 2002
By A Customer
'Little Women' is a touching story with a message - that money isn't everything. For the March girls, Meg, Jo, Beth and Amy, money isn't exactly in its plenty, with their father away, life can sometimes seem difficult. However, the girls seem to pull through anything, and even Amy, the youngest and most extravagent of the girls learns to cope with the hardships. With no male presence in the house, Jo sees it her duty to be the father figure, and her boyish nature and firey temper often clash with those of her older and more ladylike sister Meg. The peacekeeper of the family is Beth. She is gentle and quiet, she never has a cross word to say, and she just takes life as it comes.
In my opinion, 'Little Women' is an essential read for any girl. Its charm, sensitivity and sometimes light humour make it the sort of book you'll want to read again and again.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant!, 29 Feb 2004
By A Customer
This a book that all young teenagers should read, especially those who also grow up as one of a number of sisters. I could relate to Jo, since I'm the black sheep in the family and suffering the role as a middle one and being second oldest. Jo is delightful as are the other sisters esp. Amy. This a lovely story focusing on these sisters going on a journey of discovery and getting over their faults: Meg's vanity, Jo's boyish ways, Beth's shyness and Amy's selfishness. This is also a good read for mothers who are managing girls during those trying years. So mothers and daughters get your copy now!
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Memories, 2 Sep 2010
How wonderful to find this beautiful book. Downloaded the Kindle for Mac and found this! I remember reading a battered old copy of Little Women which belonged to my Grandma when I was a small child. Now I can sit and read on my Mac as the hubby and the kids run round my feet!! Bliss
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Little Women (Collins Classics)
Little Women (Collins Classics) by Louisa May Alcott
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