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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Greatness, 1 Jan 2011
This review is from: Heimat 2 - Chronicle Of A Generation [DVD] (DVD)
Probably the greatest thing that has ever been shown on television. In his 3 Heimat-chronicles Edgar Reitz takes tv-drama to new heights. Realistic and dreamlike, poetic, moving and funny. The history of Germany (and Europe) seen through the eyes of the members of one family. Unforgettable.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Heimat Series 2 - ... They Do Things Differently There, 14 Sep 2012
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Mr. P. J. Turner "Captain Lard" (Sheffield UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Heimat 2 - Chronicle Of A Generation [DVD] (DVD)
This second instalment of Heimat focuses on Hermann, the musically gifted son of Maria Simone and covers the Sixties when he ventures outside humble Shabbach and seeks fame and fortune in comparatively exotic Munich.

Hermann is the second series is played by actor Henry Arnold, bringing a more rounded performance to the young Lennon like loner from Series One. He has the inevitable culture shock in the big city, reminiscent of all people, of Woody in Cheers! Before long, Hermann is sucked in to a circle of self obsessed bright young things, each convinced they have potential greatness coursing through their veins.

To the actors' credit, they all appear convincing at their chosen instruments and must have been hand picked as much for their genuine musical talent as their acting ability. Here they actually look like they're playing the piano, guitar or cello, because they most probably are (either that or they've put a hell of a lot of practice into miming that convincingly). This adds greatly to the overall feel of the series. No self conscious miming or camera cutting away from the hands as in series One.

There is however, a nagging feeling that continuity between the two series is compromised as incidents involving Hermann in the first series curiously fail to surface again in the latter episodes of the second. Nevertheless it's still an engrossing sequel. Once again take your time, make yourself comfortable and revisit a time that beguiled you before.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Good stuff, 26 Aug 2012
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Stephan William Hawthorne "menorcabook" (menorca balearics) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Heimat 2 - Chronicle Of A Generation [DVD] (DVD)
An exciting insight into Munich in the 70 s
Bleak and should be seen on the large screen. Mostly in B and W Black and White and much different from Heimat 1 and Heimat 3
Students in near post war Munich and the freedom ant capitalist themes running around at the time.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Does Everything Important Escape the Camera's Eye? Proving Reinhard (Partly) Wrong ..., 24 Dec 2013
By 
Nicholas Casley (Plymouth, Devon, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Heimat 2 - Chronicle Of A Generation [DVD] (DVD)
Whereas Heimat I looked at the history of much of twentieth-century Germany through a lens established in one small village in the Rhineland, Heimat II does the same for one decade (the 1960s) in a community of young art intellectuals in the city of Munich. This is a generation that was born during the Second World War, a generation that is full of youthful idealism that gradually turns to cynicism by the end of the decade. This film charts that progress - or regress, depending on your point of view.

It is to the big Bavarian city that Hermann Simon heads from the rural Rhineland as a new student at Munich's Conservatoire of Music. The only other characters from the original series to re-appear in Heimat II are Hermann's aunty Pauline and his great-aunt Marie-Goot; and Glasisch makes a brief appearance in the final episode.

Heimat II is worth repeated watching: having watched the series now on DVD a second time, I see so many links that I missed in the earlier episodes the first time round. And the series can certainly be watched independently of Heimat I, although it would not be as rich an experience without the back-story. For instance, in the first episode, before he leaves home, the young Hermann - played in this series not by the same actor as in the first (he was probably too old), but by the talented and beautiful Henry Arnold - vows never to love again "because if love exists it can only exist once." And viewers of Heimat I will know that he has already used up his self-denying quota. He also vows that music will be his only love and that he will never to return to his mother's house.

Whether he fulfils all these vows - and, like all juvenile crises, the opening scenes are a bit OTT - is left to the new viewer to discover in the thirteen episodes here presented. Each episode is two hours long on average, which intimates the achievement of Edgar Reitz and his team in presenting to us what is in effect the equivalent of thirteen feature films. Each episode ostensibly focuses on one of the characters in Hermann's circle of friends as we progress year by year through the decade. Thus, each episode is subtitled as follows: Hermann 1960; Juan 1960-1; Evelyne 1961; Ansgar 1961-2; Helga 1962; Alex 1963; Clarissa 1963; Schnusschen 1964; Fraulein Cerphal 1965; Reinhard 1966; Rob, 1967-8; Stefan 1968-9; and finally Hermann & Clarissa 1970.

But Hermann appears in all the films, and many of the other characters appear too. Some main characters, such as Renate (the law student who wants to be an actress) or Volker (the pianist) and his sidekick Jean-Marie (the conductor), do not get a film devoted to them. But being the 1960s, and being partly spent at the conservatoire, Heimat II is able to comment on the classical musical styles of the era - Volker at one point instructs his ensemble to "play it static with lots of expression." And this also allows composer Nikos Mamangakis (who himself appears in one episode) to come up with some interesting sounds in the modernist style, played at concerts or in rehearsal by the actors, as well as some good incidental music.

Some episodes stand out more than others. I particularly enjoyed the one centred around philosopher-of-the-bottle Alex on the day of Kennedy's assassination. Alex spends the day looking for food or begging money from his friends. That the film is soaked (either latently in the early years of the decade or explicitly in the later) in the youthful 1960s philosophy of revolution goes without saying. Alex's philosophical contribution tends to be limited to quoting others, but sometimes the film will donate its own acute observations. For example, some members of Hermann's milieu are film-makers rather than music students (is Edgar Reitz here being semi-autobiographical?); and after the death of student writer Reinhard, his colleague, cute student cameraman Rob, relates how Reinhard had once told him, "Everything important in life is invisible and escapes the camera's eye: love, what people think and feel, death." But Rob disagreed and became a cameraman "because I distrusted words."

As well as the well-constructed script and the imaginative camerawork, there are the clever edits, such as in episode eight, where Frau Cerphal's aged father has to write his will with his left hand as his right one no longer `works'. This scene is then cut straight to Volker playing Ravel's Piano Concerto for the Left Hand. This is another episode that stands out, where Frau Cerphal's family's Nazi past has a brighter but still shady light cast upon it with Frau Cerphal herself still being at heart a child who is unable or unwilling to face up to the truth.

Watching all these characters develop over ten years means that the viewer certainly feels some affinity with them, much as a viewer of a soap opera would do. But Heimat II is on a different level. Given the large ensemble, I was disappointed that there are no gay characters. The closest we come to is the ambiguity between Volker and Jean-Marie, but both then sleep with Clarissa (separately!). Meanwhile, Hermann has an eye for the ladies, and they certainly have an eye for him. But at the end, in 1970 when Hermann is thirty, all his friends have gone, and one by one they pass through his field of vision as he heads home: Alex is now an alcoholic, Volker and Jean-Marie are impresarios, Juan is a circus performer, Helga is a member of a revolutionary cell, and Stefan is a film producer entertainer.

Hermann himself has done well, ending the decade a successful composer of sorts. In the last episode he chases his long-desired Clarissa across Europe (she is in a touring production), finally reaching her in Amsterdam. They finally get to spend the night together and the last thing they say to one another is "Can we last?" This begs a sequel. Heimat III tells us they do not, and yet ...

There are no extras on this handsomely-packaged set.
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15 of 18 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Heimat 2, 30 Jan 2011
This review is from: Heimat 2 - Chronicle Of A Generation [DVD] (DVD)
A good trip down memory lane for those who remember the 1960s.The characters are not the typical country folk we meet in the first series.This is the alienated generation of the almost decadent emotionally crippled artists of a Thomas Mann novel.Lurking in the background are also the seeds of the RAF terrorism of the next decade and the growing gulf between these young students and their former Nazi parents.Some of the characters and events I didn't find entirely credible but on the whole if you enjoyed the first series you should enjoy this one too.The same theme,Heimatliebe,is still there.It permeates every episode but this time it's given a much more choppy ride.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Heimat 2, 19 May 2011
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This review is from: Heimat 2 - Chronicle Of A Generation [DVD] (DVD)
This is a series that I watched on Irish TV years ago, it really touched me then, and it is the same now. Ireally enjoy it! All the caracters, their love of art and music. And you really get the feel what it was like to grow up in Germany in the sixtys, their yarn for freedom and love of art&culture.
I know I will watch this many more times...
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4.0 out of 5 stars 25 Hours plus, but engrossing., 5 Oct 2013
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This review is from: Heimat 2 - Chronicle Of A Generation [DVD] (DVD)
Those familiar with the original Heimat will know of the upsets the family went through relating to Herman's 'coming of age' and his subsequent success as a composer. Heimat 2 fills in the gaps telling the story of Herman's life in Munich after leaving the village and taking up his music studies. A fascinating insight into the life of young people in Germany in the 60's - eager to shed the shadow of the now despised National Socialist era and to move on into a new and exciting world. Music features heavily as you might expect given Herman's chosen course and much centres around the 'new' styles of classical music and film which appeared in this period. Generally each of the 13 films follows the story of one of the group of friends with whom he rubs shoulders though individual story lines overlap throughout. Much more use of colour than Heimat, though black and white still used to good effect.
Subtitled 'Chronicle of a Generation' it is different from Heimat in that it examines individual lifestyles rather than that of a community, but it makes compelling viewing as did the original. The fact that there is a time overlap with Heimat makes for interesting comparisons with life firmly set in tradition back in the village and the constant push for progress in the city.
If you enjoyed Heimat, then this is a must buy. If you haven't seen Heimat, that wouldn't necessarily spoil the enjoyment of Heimat 2, but it would help to put things into context. Happy to recommend.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Great service, 8 Dec 2012
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David Hellawell "davidh3074" (Bromsgrove, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Heimat 2 - Chronicle Of A Generation [DVD] (DVD)
Excellent to have this on DVD at last. This is one I watch every few years and it evokes my own time in Germany in an excellent way. Product was in great condition and delivery was speedy.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Heimat II, 11 Mar 2012
This review is from: Heimat 2 - Chronicle Of A Generation [DVD] (DVD)
I had seen Heimat 2 - Chronicle Of A Generation [DVD] some Years ago on German Television. I liked it so much that I wanted the DVD in order to watch it again. It is in German language with English subtitles, whioh did not bother me, because I am fluent in the language. It captures the life of young people around that time perfectly. Although my musical tastes are somewhat different, I did enjoy Heimat II thoroughly and would highly recommend it.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Heimat 2, 4 Aug 2013
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This review is from: Heimat 2 - Chronicle Of A Generation [DVD] (DVD)
After the success of the first Heimat a sequel was inevitable. Personally I didn't think this was as good as the the one but still worth watching
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Heimat 2 - Chronicle Of A Generation [DVD]
Heimat 2 - Chronicle Of A Generation [DVD] by Edgar Reitz (DVD - 2010)
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