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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Funny, interesting and fairly honest... I think!
I read this book when it came out a few months ago and i have given it 4 stars beaause it is a thoroughly entertaining read. How fowler grew up, his addiction to football and the feelings it gave him and the abuse of the everton fans that drove him to being a red through and through. Fowler's denial of drug abuse holds up (has he ever tested positive or conveniently...
Published on 1 Jun 2006 by Mr. G. Criddle

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars much, much better player than wordsmith .......
A great player when in his pomp, Fowler brought many moments of joy to all Liverpool fans. However, just as his career was punctured with debilitating injuries, so too was this book disappointingly disjointed. Why ever do editors not fully proof read such books before giving the go ahead to be published?
One is frequently irritated by Fowler`s repeated references to...
Published on 20 Dec 2010 by db 54


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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Funny, interesting and fairly honest... I think!, 1 Jun 2006
By 
I read this book when it came out a few months ago and i have given it 4 stars beaause it is a thoroughly entertaining read. How fowler grew up, his addiction to football and the feelings it gave him and the abuse of the everton fans that drove him to being a red through and through. Fowler's denial of drug abuse holds up (has he ever tested positive or conveniently forgotten the test (Rio!)?); he also admits that sometimes his seriousness and dedication was lacking, something which many of us are guilty of! The book does not get 5 stars though because Fowler does not seem to recognise that with perhaps extra dedication at a time when most of the footballing world was turning itself into super-athletes, then maybe he would have won titles for himself and Liverpool and maybe more other trophies. Fowler puts it down to bad luck, but you make your own luck don't you? He is still GOD and i am delighted to see him back at Anfield. Now the chance for the perfect ending to this wonderful story is all down to Robbie!
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16 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic insight into a true star, 16 Sep 2005
By A Customer
This book is a lot more than your typical football autobiography. This is Robbie's attempt to tell his remarkable story from Toxteth to Anfield and beyond, as well as putting to bed the rumours about drug addiction that have plagued his career since the early days, exposing the truth behind how he was very deceitfully forced out of the club he gave everything to and ultimately standing up to those who said he was finished as a footballer.
Robbie is the first to admit he is no saint and he honestly describes the events that have landed him in hot water, but it would be extremely hard for supporters of any team not to sympathise with this player whose career has been ravaged by injury since late 1997 and whose "personal life" has been created by the media who have always sought to destroy him.
A great read for anyone who is a Robbie fan, a football fan, or even a fan of a fascinating story well told.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars What a surprisingly good read, 31 July 2006
By 
As I am a United fan I picked this book up not expecting to like it at all, however I was pleasantly surprised. I'm not saying I like the fella, after all as a United fan that would not be socially acceptable would it! However, having read a fair few football autobiographys, they all seem much of a muchness, this one seems different to the other stories of, blahdy blah, practiced for 16 hours a day since the age of 6, blahdy blah, never had time for girls, friends or drink because of my dedication, blahdy blah, played for such and such a boys team etc. etc. Whenever I read a football autobiography I'm just rushing to get through the first few chapters to get the boring "early years" out of the way, however this book wasn't like that at all. He didn't bore me with the usual (as above), and his young life, though not necessarily interesting, was written in such a way that it kept me glued till the more interesting parts of when he signed for Liverpool. The language is quite harsh and not really for kids, but this is probably what makes the story so real and riveting. Very surprisingly frank account of his life, from someone I thought never had it in him. But he does. Nice one.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A very God read., 14 Sep 2007
By 
S. Knight (Wirral) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Watched Liverpool reserves play against Tranmere reserves in 1990 and Liverpool won 6-0 when some unknown kid from Toxteth touched the ball six times and scored all six goals.His name was Robbie Fowler and i have watched his career with some interest since.
This autobiography is a fascinating read tracing his rise from playing with his mates in the back streets of Liverpool to becoming the most leathal of goalscorers,scoring 171 goals in just 330 appearances for Liverpool in the newly formed Premiership.
Coping with his new found fame and adulation,not to mention the millions he was to earn so suddenly didn't come easy and he is at pains to dispell the rumours of drug addiction and being labelled a 'scally',yes he likes a laugh and joke but deep down Robbie comes across a shy and level headed chap.
Robbie's career got off to a flying start banging goals in left right and centre in his first four seasons as a regular at Anfield before injuries and eventual fall out with Gerrard Houllier and Phil Thompson saw his career stall somewhat before eventualy moving onto,first Leeds Utd and then Manchester City,but he was never to really recapture the form that led to him being nicknamed 'God' by the Anfield faithfull.
People often ask Robbie where it all went wrong,well for a lad from Toxteth with nothing who only ever dreamt of playing football,it went rather spectacularly well to be honest.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best football autobiography I've read, 2 Jun 2006
Finished it this morning. I've read quite a few autobiographies from players and managers, and this is definitely the funniest. Tony Adams and John Barnes were just boring, Harry Redknapp was quite good, Kevin Keegan was good up to where it got to (just left Newcastle, not yet joined Fulham, long before England and Man City), but of course he's done much more since, but this has even been updated with a little epilogue written at Christmas 2005 after Robbie had rejoined Liverpool on the six month contract, which as we all know has now been extended.

As the other reviewers have said, he professes his love for all things Scouse (except Evertonians), his admiration for Dalglish, Souness and Evans, his dislike of Houllier, Thompson, Hoddle and Eriksson, and goes into some, but not much, detail of his family life, his relationship with Macca and other ex-Liverpool team-mates, and his life since he left Anfield (the mis-management at Leeds, the lies he was told at Man City).

And some of the silly little anecdotes he throws in show that he really is just like you imagine him to be, a silly little Scally chuckling away to himself at the stupid tricks and daft adventures he has got up to, with other players, with his old mates, and on his own. He goes out drinking and nightclubbing, he used to attend lap-dancing clubs and strip-shows, he fraternised with the Spice Girls and with Robbie Williams. He's injured himself doing stupid stunts in training, he's been beaten up in hotels, he's been stitched up by rogue journalists and photographers, he nearly got killed in a car crash on the M62. He freely admits he did not achieve as much as he could if injury had not struck him down over and over again, if he hadn't fallen out with the management at Liverpool and England, and if he had managed to curb his enthusiasm and his temper, but you get the feeling that if he was to do it all over again he wouldn't change much.

Only one section wallows in self-pity, the last six months at Manchester City, other than that you get the feeling he was having a good time, even if he wasn't playing, was being criticised by his superiors, the press, the other players and the fans, and he sets the record straight on lots of things he has been accused of, some true, but an awful lot not true.

Think I'll get the Phil Thompson one next, and see how he paints his side of the story. And see whether the "Robbie was kicking footballs at me so I got him dropped" story appears in his book as well. But as for this one, very very good.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A decent footballer book, 9 Jan 2008
I've read many footballer's autobiographies and for the most part they're a very mixed bunch. This is one of the better ones because it's obvious that Robbie Fowler has gone into great detail and had a large say in what is written. Too many of the other books appear to have been ghostwritten by someone who only ever met the player in question once in a coffee shop. Not so here. This covers all of Robbie's career and how he felt at all the vital moments.
An excellent read. And it's about God.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great book, 16 Sep 2005
By 
M. P. Smith "keirr1234" (England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
this book is the best auto biography i have read and you will love this if you are a liverpool fan.It also reveals alot about many players and managers (Houllier) that i didnt know about before. It is also a very funny book and i would recommend it to liverpool fans and city fans and for people who want to know about how liverpool was run behind the scenes and some nasty secrets.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars God's Story,,,, 24 Nov 2005
Just finished reading this Amazon purchase today and the account of a great footballer, near-legend and Anfield hero. For the first time this is a reveal-all account of his tumultuous footballing career, what was, what is and what could have been. Despite ending on an optimistic note where he sums up just how much he's achieved as a player (3rd highest premiership scorer, stackloads of cups and fastest hat-trick of all time etc), it's no secret that things could have turned out significantly better, which he makes no attempt to gloss over and hide throughout.
This truthfulness is reflected in the style of the book in general and David Maddock as co-writer and probably editor makes no attempt to polish up the star's bad language and slang, which in turn shows how heartfelt and refreshingly honest the account is. Let's see how much of that there is in old Pinocchio's new book (if anyone's interested).
Indeed it is his relationship (or lack of) with Thompson and Gerard Houllier that generates the most interest here, and their shameful and sometimes hilarious attempts at railroading Anfield's favourite son until he was left with no option to quit his beloved club, which destroyed my enthusiasm for the team no end. This and his addressal of the drug rumours and media hysteria over his 'antics' - (nicely blown out of all sensible proportion by our supportive and encouraging media) make it a real treat for any Fowler fan. I just wonder why he never tried to defend his reputation so publicly before, it's believable that he just wanted to get his head down and play football for his club but Houllier never deserved that level of regard in truth.
Also covered is his time with England, his career never really taking off there - not difficult when you have Glenn Hoddle managing you followed by Kevin Keegan and Sven, then consequently the disaster of financial mis-management that unfolded at Leeds and the turmoil of the first two seasons at Man City. The bad luck as a striker he's had, plagued with injuries, bad people management and mis-sold information (e.g. 'Come to Leeds! We've got loads of money and we'll be in Europe next year!) only demonstrates how far he could have actually gone in the game without it all. But that's for Houllier and all to spend their time worrying about, he's got three or four years in him at least and perhaps we can be as entertained by 'God' just as much, wherever he plays.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars GOD, 7 Sep 2005
I've always been a robbie fowler fan and was pleased when he decided to become a City player. Unfortunately he has turned out to be a bit disapointing although the recent signs are he is getting better. Its refreshing to read a book where the player is frank enough to say that things are not going well for him at the moment. The stories of his Liverpool days are brilliant and its plain to see now that Liverpool is the club he still wants to play for.
Insights into Houllier, Thompson and sven's management styles are very interesting but it may just be a case of sour grapes as none of them really liked him as a player.
If you are a city or liverpool fan or if you hate Gary Neville then i would recommend that you buy this book its brilliant.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars much, much better player than wordsmith ......., 20 Dec 2010
By 
db 54 (london, uk) - See all my reviews
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A great player when in his pomp, Fowler brought many moments of joy to all Liverpool fans. However, just as his career was punctured with debilitating injuries, so too was this book disappointingly disjointed. Why ever do editors not fully proof read such books before giving the go ahead to be published?
One is frequently irritated by Fowler`s repeated references to his Toxteth roots (the boy from the back streets makes good, .... yawwwwwnnn) and pitiful and continuous denials about alleged drug taking. For goodness sake Robbie, you need only once to inform us readers of where you were born and raised, whilst repeated denials of drug taking makes one think the writer doth protest too much!
The major blight however emanates from the rambling style employed where an interesting episode/event is broached, .... and then irresponsibly abandoned, left unexamined, unexplained or non concluded. What saved the book ultimately is his in depth description and account of the bitterness he felt towards Gerard Houllier and Phil Thompson, who seemingly and systematically hounded him out of the club. Both these characters are exposed, according to Fowler, as egotistical maniacs who clearly did NOT act fully in the club`s interests with their petty mindedness and poor decision making. Now this WAS read-worthy and the relative lack of punch pulling is both very revealing and welcome.
Also of great interest was Fowler`s interpretation of the LFC`s directors` gross lack of confidence in Roy Evans` judgement. Put simply, a little more financial backing would very possibly have lead to a few major signings (Sherringham for example) who would in turn have almost guaranteed winning the premiership during the 1990s. Although not examined in great depth, one ultimately cannot help but have confirmed that the sacking of Souness was premature and unsound.
Very revealing too was just how disruptive was the fantastically talented Stan Collymore`s brief stay at liverpool, a somewhat frustratingly flawed genius if ever there was one. References to Hoddle, Keegan and Fowler`s brief stay at Leeds are also quite entertaining and informative.
What ruined/spoiled this book for me was the failure to present all the varied incidents and events in this player`s career in a less rambling, repetetive and incohesive format, hence just a 3 star rating.
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