Customer Reviews


167 Reviews
5 star:
 (54)
4 star:
 (47)
3 star:
 (30)
2 star:
 (14)
1 star:
 (22)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


23 of 25 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Glorious, romantic, sweeping classical monster drama
I watched this film with fairly low expectations. As a huge fan of werewolf films where the cursed guy undergoes a 'total' transformation to look far more like a wolf than a human - films like American Werewolf, The Howling and Dog Soldiers - I really dislike 'big bloke with a hairy face' werewolf films. I saw the original a long time ago and thought it was good, but was...
Published on 23 Sept. 2010 by Benminx

versus
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars "Life is far too glorious, especially for the cursed and damned like myself."
At times the extended version of 2010's The Wolfman is a case of a film failing for all the right reasons: an interesting attempt to mix a classical moviemaking aesthetic and old school production techniques with modern production values that often does a lot right but strangely never quite works as well as it should. Whether that's down to much-publicised production...
Published on 9 Dec. 2012 by Trevor Willsmer


‹ Previous | 1 217 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars "Life is far too glorious, especially for the cursed and damned like myself.", 9 Dec. 2012
By 
Trevor Willsmer (London, England) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
At times the extended version of 2010's The Wolfman is a case of a film failing for all the right reasons: an interesting attempt to mix a classical moviemaking aesthetic and old school production techniques with modern production values that often does a lot right but strangely never quite works as well as it should. Whether that's down to much-publicised production problems and extensive reshoots that saw the budget nearly double while the studio tinkered with it for the best part of a year-and-a-half and ensured that neither the 118-minute unrated cut on DVD or the 102-minute theatrical version that accompanies it on the Blu-ray is a true reflection of the director's original cut is a moot point, but it may simply be that director Joe Johnston took too classical an approach at times. The 1941 version isn't a great film by any means and certainly didn't have the resources this reworking had, but at least it kept things moving while this takes its cue from its house of buried secrets and underplays its hand a little too much at times. Johnston may have talent and an obvious love and respect for old Hollywood and classic filmmaking, but at times you can't help thinking that Anthony Hopkins' could have been talking about him when he says "You have a long way to go yet, my young pup."

The first hour of the extended version certainly drags its paws a bit with too many deliberately lifeless domestic scenes until it finally develops some real bite in the second half with a combination of vivid setpieces, be they beastly rampages, rooftop chases or a drug-fuelled nightmare asylum sequence that give great vintage montage straight out of the 40s, and not entirely unexpected plot twists that put a new spin on the troubled father-son relationship of the original film. Most importantly it develops a sense of pace and urgency that carries you along that the first half could sorely have done with. The original Universal monster movies were always tightly paced affairs around the 70-minute mark, and the studio seem to have taken a leaf from their book with the shorter version they eventually released on the big screen, which is surprisingly a huge improvement and a much more satisfying film by far.

Most of the cuts are from the first half of the picture, and there are few that you could disagree with. Gone is Talbot's unsympathetic backstage introduction, his half-gypsy heritage and much of Hopkins' silent eccentricities, improving his performance in the process as well as making things move faster and smoother. It's not all good news, with the revamped 40s Universal logo replaced, while some atmospheric shots of Talbot Hall and a cameo with an unbilled Max Von Sydow as a stranger offering a subtle link between the werewolf of this tale and the Beast of Gévaudan hitting the cutting room to keep things moving. Ultimately they're trade-offs worth making, proving the old adage that what you leave out can be as important as what you keep in the editing. That's even more noticeable in one of the deleted scenes on the disc where the Wolfman gatecrashes a society masque where the guests all think he's wearing a costume: while obviously extremely expensive, it doesn't really work and would have slowed the picture to a halt just when it had picked up a full head of speed.

In a role outside his usual comfort zone Benicio Del Toro gives an interestingly subdued performance that doesn't play for easy sympathy, Anthony Hopkins similarly tones down his potentially hammy role while a dowdy looking Emily Blunt gives the kind of capable performance that's more her stock in trade than the exceptional ones many critics claim. Even Hugo Weaving is pleasingly understated for once as the policeman on his trail (Inspector Abilene of Jack the Ripper infamy, no less), with the sole portion of ham being served up by Anthony Sher's Jermunn Sykiatwrist in a performance seasoned with a liberal dash of Lionel Atwill.

Despite their Oscar win the makeup effects aren't as impressive as they could be, although Rick Baker does make up for the underwhelming first transformation with an especially visceral second one in front of hundreds of assembled doctors and some rather impressive makeup in the finale that makes the actor underneath the hair recognisable even though it's almost certainly a stuntman. Similarly a few other effects are less than impressive, looking like last minute additions to try to beef things up, although the combination of CGi and miniatures does allow our tormented antihero to go on the rampage right in the heart of Victorian London in the best of the film's big three setpieces (the other two, an attack on a gypsy camp by a barely glimpsed beast and Talbot taking on the werewolf who created him as a mansion burns around them are pretty good too). Despite the post-first cut changes, Talbot never turns into a demonic wolf but remains very definitely a wolf MAN, largely walking upright in a surprisingly effective throwback to the original Universal Wolfman cycle.

The film is also very obviously influenced by Bram Stoker's Dracula [DVD] [1992], and not just in the casting of Hopkins. Danny Elfman's brooding orchestral score nods to Wojciech Kilar's memorable music for Coppola's film without falling into slavish impersonation that you wonder why the studio ever thought removing it and commissioning an electronic replacement (by Paul Haslinger) was a good idea before they came to their senses and put it back: it's not one of his major works, but it serves the film and its mood well. The early somewhat monotonous tone in the extended cut certainly hinders it and the lack of a convincing love story takes the pathos from the ending, but for all the problems and accompanying bad press, in the 102-minute version at least the film ultimately turned out surprisingly well and easily one of the best monster movie revivals in a long time.

You won't find much detail about those problems in the extras on the Blu-ray - along with a trivia track, picture-in-picture featurettes and occasional commentary by Johnston, the accompanying featurettes are of the promotional puff-piece variety, though the studio's uncertainty is very evident in the two alternate endings on the Blu-ray that alter the characters' fates in the final shots: one might have worked had the love story been there but the other simply looks like a cheap bit of sequel baiting. As usual DVD buyers get the short stick, with only the longer cut of the film and the deleted and extended scenes.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


36 of 39 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars An old school creature-feature, 28 May 2010
By 
J. Morris "Josh" (London) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
The Wolfman is a remake (with a lot of artistic license) of the 1941 film of the same name, updated and embellished with today's visual effects. Anthony Hopkins (Hannibal) plays a dark and austere Sir John Talbot, who has recently lost one of his sons. The other son, played by Benicio Del Toro (Che) returns home to Talbot Hall after a prodigal absence and sets about determining what has happened to his late brother. After fate has taken it's course, an inspector (Hugo Weaving - The Matrix) is sent from Scotland Yard to detect just what is happening in the sleepy town of Blackmoor due to a number of it's residents meeting with grisly demises.

What sets the Wolfman apart from other horror B-movies is just how bleak and gothic the milleu is; Talbot Hall (really Chatsworth House) is breathtaking. The approach across the moor really instills a sense of wonderment. The house is deliberately in a state of decrepitude & disrepair as Sir John has retreated from society and has few guests thesedays with only his Indian man-servant for company. The acting is fantastic and the first portion of the film has much of the air of a period drama that really develops the back-story and fills out the characters, even moreso in this version, the Extended Cut.

It is when we see the Wolfman that things start to unravel, the effects are good, but the end result is that the Wolfman looks like he did in the 1941 version; a guy in a gorilla suit. Now perhaps I have become too accustomed to the Underworld versioning of Werewolves; with elongated snouts and a much more feral appearance, but the Wolfman here looks like a chap in dire need of a shave and a trip to the dentists. The real saving grace for this film is the fantastic rendition of the caustic and waspish detective by Hugo Weaving. He really injects some much needed dry humour into the film. This, coupled with some exciting on-screen chemistry between Del Toro and Emily Blunt are the best elements of the Wolfman.

It is sad that this film suffered from a lack of unified artistic direction (many directors hot-seated this production after a spat between the original director and the studio) as it starts so well, the first 40 minutes really drawing you in but by the end you end up rueing what it has become - a gory, gruesome creature-feature with little imagination and too few scary moments. In conclusion, I would recommend this film for a decent period romp, but don't expect to be frightened by it as you will probably laugh at the Wolfman!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


23 of 25 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Glorious, romantic, sweeping classical monster drama, 23 Sept. 2010
I watched this film with fairly low expectations. As a huge fan of werewolf films where the cursed guy undergoes a 'total' transformation to look far more like a wolf than a human - films like American Werewolf, The Howling and Dog Soldiers - I really dislike 'big bloke with a hairy face' werewolf films. I saw the original a long time ago and thought it was good, but was hugely disappointed when I saw a still of the werewolf from this remake in a mag and saw it suffered from 'bloke with a hairy face' syndrome. Imagine my surprise then when I found myself utterly enthralled twenty minutes in. Del Toro is a magnetic, fascinating leading man as always, drawing us deeply onto his side long before his transformation. As his cold and twisted estranged father, Anthony Hopkins is superb, giving off a detatched complacency and superiority that really elevates the game in their relationship. Emily Blunt, as Gwen, the bereaved fiancee of Del-Toro's brother is both note-perfect with her compassion and loss, and charming as a character who's far more convincing than the usual period-set female lead. And the period setting is gorgeous. Set in the late 1800's, it's the right time for mysticism and magic to still hold sway over the public's minds, and gypsies roam the lands, inflaming passions and resentment in the local Estate's villagers. When Del-Toro's Lawrence Talbot caves in to Gwen's request to help her locate her missing fiancee, he must return home to the family estate. After the discovery of his brother's horrendously mutliated corpse, his investigation brings him into contact with the local caravan of gypsies amidst an atmosphere of growing fear, and it's here that director Johnston pulls out all the stops. All my fears about an underwhelming werewolf went away with this scene. And I'm hard to impress.
It's like a furry car. The sense of power of the beast is staggering. Fast, lethal, always shown enough to thrill but never completely given away, it pounds and thunders through the camp like a storm of terror and blood, massive claws and teeth slashing and disfiguring in frequently very graphic ways. This may be a classical monster movie, but the team are savvy enough to know that today's audience expect blood.
After a thrilling one-on-one, Lawrence is nursed back to health by a guilty Gwen, and it's not long before the villagers notice his transformation from near death to rude health with growing suspicion. From there, vigilantes and Scotland Yard become involved, and the film showed the potential for a few very nice twists and scenes which I won't give away here.
Suffice it to say that it's not unpredictable, but that every scene is handled with such dedication and panache that it doesn't matter if you've seen it before - you'll rarely have seen it done this WELL.
The effects are terrific. The sets and scenery are exquisite on blu-ray, shown off to astounding detail as intricately glorious. The film has everything that you imagine an old-time horror classic should have, but transplanted flawlessly into a modern movie. Moss-covered forests laden with drifting mist, huge ramshackle stately homes, a dirty frontier-feeling London, gorgeous candle-lit rooms, and clunky, clumsy firearms. Hugo Weaving is exactly right as Inspector Abberline leading the Scotland Yard hunt, and Andrew Kevin Walker and David Self's excellent screenplay feels just perfect.
Guts, grandeur, romance, thrills, tragedy and horror.
They've even managed to make most of the scenes with Del-Toro's furry visage exciting or frightening.
This was one hell of a brilliant ride.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


15 of 17 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars An old school creature-feature, 28 May 2010
By 
J. Morris "Josh" (London) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Wolfman (2010) - Extended Cut Limited Edition Steelbook [Blu-ray] [Region Free] (Blu-ray)
The Wolfman is a remake (with a lot of artistic license) of the 1941 film of the same name, updated and embellished with today's visual effects. Anthony Hopkins (Hannibal) plays a dark and austere Sir John Talbot, who has recently lost one of his sons. The other son, played by Benicio Del Toro (Che) returns home to Talbot Hall after a prodigal absence and sets about determining what has happened to his late brother. After fate has taken it's course, an inspector (Hugo Weaving - The Matrix) is sent from Scotland Yard to detect just what is happening in the sleepy town of Blackmoor due to a number of it's residents meeting with grisly demises.

What sets the Wolfman apart from other horror B-movies is just how bleak and gothic the milleu is; Talbot Hall (really Chatsworth House) is breathtaking. The approach across the moor really instills a sense of wonderment. The house is deliberately in a state of decrepitude & disrepair as Sir John has retreated from society and has few guests thesedays with only his Indian man-servant for company. The acting is fantastic and the first portion of the film has much of the air of a period drama that really develops the back-story and fills out the characters, even moreso in this version, the Extended Cut.

It is when we see the Wolfman that things start to unravel, the effects are good, but the end result is that the Wolfman looks like he did in the 1941 version; a guy in a gorilla suit. Now perhaps I have become too accustomed to the Underworld versioning of Werewolves; with elongated snouts and a much more feral appearance, but the Wolfman here looks like a chap in dire need of a shave and a trip to the dentists. The real saving grace for this film is the fantastic rendition of the caustic and waspish detective by Hugo Weaving. He really injects some much needed dry humour into the film. This, coupled with some exciting on-screen chemistry between Del Toro and Emily Blunt are the best elements of the Wolfman.

It is sad that this film suffered from a lack of unified artistic direction (many directors hot-seated this production after a spat between the original director and the studio) as it starts so well, the first 40 minutes really drawing you in but by the end you end up rueing what it has become - a gory, gruesome creature-feature with little imagination and too few scary moments. In conclusion, I would recommend this film for a decent period romp, but don't expect to be frightened by it as you will probably laugh at the Wolfman! The alternative ending in this version is a real eyebrow raiser!!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars WHY DID THE DOG GROWL?, 7 Oct. 2013
"Mysterious Gothic feel" is a buzz phrase for "poor lighting" because the special effects weren't that great. The acting was good and the story line was just fine. The movie was ruined by 19th century novelist dialogue that better fit a Jane Austin novel than a Gothic horror. The scenes tended to be dark to hide the fact the special effects have not improved since "American Werewolf in London." Lawrence Talbot is told by his brother's fiancee that he is missing. Talbot returns home only to find out his brother has been found dead, ripped to pieces. The movie is a complete bore until Talbot gets bitten by a werewolf and survives (not unexpected in a werewolf story). He then walks through the house and the dog growls at him. He stops as if he knows this is some kind of sign he is a werewolf. The scene would have worked except the dog growled at him all the time before he was bit and also (mini-plot spoiler) lives with Talbot's dad who is also a werewolf (revealed about half way through if you hadn't figured it out before hand). The gypsy woman which was great in the 1941 master piece is reduced to a minor character. Hugo Weaving plays a Scotland Yard investigator, thinks the killings that happen while Lawrence Talbot was away was caused by him, another bad plot element, which made as much sense as the dog growling. The werewolves in this movie just don't kill one guy and are done for the night, rather they go on senseless killing sprees. As in most werewolf movies the action jumps from full moon to full moon, which seem to come at an incredible rate.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars "Life is far too glorious, especially for the cursed and damned like myself.", 13 Dec. 2011
By 
Trevor Willsmer (London, England) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Wolfman (2010) - Extended Cut Limited Edition Steelbook [Blu-ray] [Region Free] (Blu-ray)
At times the extended version of 2010's The Wolfman is a case of a film failing for all the right reasons: an interesting attempt to mix a classical moviemaking aesthetic and old school production techniques with modern production values that often does a lot right but strangely never quite works as well as it should. Whether that's down to much-publicised production problems and extensive reshoots that saw the budget nearly double while the studio tinkered with it for the best part of a year-and-a-half and ensured that neither the 118-minute unrated cut on DVD or the 102-minute theatrical version that accompanies it on the Blu-ray is a true reflection of the director's original cut is a moot point, but it may simply be that director Joe Johnston took too classical an approach at times. The 1941 version isn't a great film by any means and certainly didn't have the resources this reworking had, but at least it kept things moving while this takes its cue from its house of buried secrets and underplays its hand a little too much at times. Johnston may have talent and an obvious love and respect for old Hollywood and classic filmmaking, but at times you can't help thinking that Anthony Hopkins' could have been talking about him when he says "You have a long way to go yet, my young pup."

The first hour of the extended version certainly drags its paws a bit with too many deliberately lifeless domestic scenes until it finally develops some real bite in the second half with a combination of vivid setpieces, be they beastly rampages, rooftop chases or a drug-fuelled nightmare asylum sequence that give great vintage montage straight out of the 40s, and not entirely unexpected plot twists that put a new spin on the troubled father-son relationship of the original film. Most importantly it develops a sense of pace and urgency that carries you along that the first half could sorely have done with. The original Universal monster movies were always tightly paced affairs around the 70-minute mark, and the studio seem to have taken a leaf from their book with the shorter version they eventually released on the big screen, which is surprisingly a huge improvement and a much more satisfying film by far.

Most of the cuts are from the first half of the picture, and there are few that you could disagree with. Gone is Talbot's unsympathetic backstage introduction, his half-gypsy heritage and much of Hopkins' silent eccentricities, improving his performance in the process as well as making things move faster and smoother. It's not all good news, with the revamped 40s Universal logo replaced, while some atmospheric shots of Talbot Hall and a cameo with an unbilled Max Von Sydow as a stranger offering a subtle link between the werewolf of this tale and the Beast of Gévaudan hitting the cutting room to keep things moving. Ultimately they're trade-offs worth making, proving the old adage that what you leave out can be as important as what you keep in the editing. That's even more noticeable in one of the deleted scenes on the disc where the Wolfman gatecrashes a society masque where the guests all think he's wearing a costume: while obviously extremely expensive, it doesn't really work and would have slowed the picture to a halt just when it had picked up a full head of speed.

In a role outside his usual comfort zone Benicio Del Toro gives an interestingly subdued performance that doesn't play for easy sympathy, Anthony Hopkins similarly tones down his potentially hammy role while a dowdy looking Emily Blunt gives the kind of capable performance that's more her stock in trade than the exceptional ones many critics claim. Even Hugo Weaving is pleasingly understated for once as the policeman on his trail (Inspector Abilene of Jack the Ripper infamy, no less), with the sole portion of ham being served up by Anthony Sher's Jermunn Sykiatwrist in a performance seasoned with a liberal dash of Lionel Atwill.

Despite their Oscar win the makeup effects aren't as impressive as they could be, although Rick Baker does make up for the underwhelming first transformation with an especially visceral second one in front of hundreds of assembled doctors and some rather impressive makeup in the finale that makes the actor underneath the hair recognisable even though it's almost certainly a stuntman. Similarly a few other effects are less than impressive, looking like last minute additions to try to beef things up, although the combination of CGi and miniatures does allow our tormented antihero to go on the rampage right in the heart of Victorian London in the best of the film's big three setpieces (the other two, an attack on a gypsy camp by a barely glimpsed beast and Talbot taking on the werewolf who created him as a mansion burns around them are pretty good too). Despite the post-first cut changes, Talbot never turns into a demonic wolf but remains very definitely a wolf MAN, largely walking upright in a surprisingly effective throwback to the original Universal Wolfman cycle.

The film is also very obviously influenced by Bram Stoker's Dracula [DVD] [1992], and not just in the casting of Hopkins. Danny Elfman's brooding orchestral score nods to Wojciech Kilar's memorable music for Coppola's film without falling into slavish impersonation that you wonder why the studio ever thought removing it and commissioning an electronic replacement (by Paul Haslinger) was a good idea before they came to their senses and put it back: it's not one of his major works, but it serves the film and its mood well. The early somewhat monotonous tone in the extended cut certainly hinders it and the lack of a convincing love story takes the pathos from the ending, but for all the problems and accompanying bad press, in the 102-minute version at least the film ultimately turned out surprisingly well and easily one of the best monster movie revivals in a long time.

You won't find much detail about those problems in the extras on the Blu-ray - along with a trivia track, picture-in-picture featurettes and occasional commentary by Johnston, the accompanying featurettes are of the promotional puff-piece variety, though the studio's uncertainty is very evident in the two alternate endings on the Blu-ray that alter the characters' fates in the final shots: one might have worked had the love story been there but the other simply looks like a cheap bit of sequel baiting. As usual DVD buyers get the short stick, with only the longer cut of the film and the deleted and extended scenes.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Much Better Than I Expected, 7 Jun. 2010
By 
M. Dowden (London, UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
I had only ever seen the trailer for this movie, I never saw it at the cinema, but I knew that I would have to see it at some stage. If like me you possibly grew up on Universal's black and white horror movies, along with Hammer Horror which formed the staple for a lot of people getting interested in the horror genre. I wasn't really sure what I was going to get here, but apparently there is an extra 17 minutes of footage not shown at the cinema. I thought this may just be a rehash of the originalThe Wolf Man (1941) by Universal, but fortunately it isn't. It takes inspiration from that film and combines elements from that, with in one case the superior The Werewolf Of London [1935], also made by Universal.

With great sets and locations as well as keeping the costumes authentic the film we are here presented with is darker than the original, and there is a definite gothic feel to the whole thing. Don't expect to be scared, because arguably a werewolf film can never achieve that. Do expect to be entertained though, because it definitely delivers. Universal have gone back to basics to a certain degree, in that there isn't scene after scene of mindless blood and gore, there is blood and gore but not all the time, and only when it is appropriate. There is a good story to this film which helps to hold it together, as does the soundtrack to a degree. Thankfully we are not given a wolf, or some CGI version of a wolf, but a proper wolf man, as is only right for this great homage.

Universal gave us some iconic horror movies last century, and with this they show that they can do so again in this century for people to enjoy in the forthcoming years. Just one other point, all the actors are good in this, but for me Anthony Hopkins really shines here, leaving everyone else in the shade.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars underrated, 3 Oct. 2010
I came at this film with low expectations after all the negative hype.
What a surprise !!!
OK its not perfect but I was pretty impressed. The mood and atmosphere was excellent. The performances were top class and it successfully mixes the old style horror with the gore and brutality that is so indicative of modern times.
The Wolfman itself is great. He should be on 2 and not 4 legs and even though the effects are CGI they serve the film well (The Howling still wins for bext werewolf film and effects in my book).
And...oh yeah...I found it pretty scary.
For those yet to see this film....give it a go and forget the moaning masses.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


20 of 23 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great period creature feature, 8 Jun. 2010
By 
PJ Rankine (Wallington, Surrey United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 1000 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
First of all, if you can't decide between the dvd and the blu ray then buy the dvd because the print quality is so good its not really worth the extra cost. I can't imagine the soundtrack will be much better than this either. With a cast consisting of Anthony Hopkins, Benicio del Toro, Emily Blunt and Hugo Weaving you expect the acting to be good and it does not disappoint. Also hidden under much beard and long hair is the excellent Art Malik playing Hopkins' sikh manservant. You can hide the man but you can't hide Malik's dulcet tones. This is a beautiful film to watch, every scene is so well lit and framed that atmosphere just oozes from every one. There is nothing frightening about the story at all, it is more of an adventure mystery featuring a monster rather than a horror film.. If anything it could do with a little less gore to appeal to an older audience, the splatter adds nothing to the story. What does add to the story is all the little touches like the steam driven double decker bus which give a real sence of period. I'm not a fan of period pieces but this film and the recent relaunch of Sherlock Holmes show that well done, this period can be as entertaining as modern times and yet infinitely more fascinating. The film is also presented in full screen which is always another plus for me.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars If you liked the film, you'll love the blu ray, 16 Jan. 2012
By 
Son of Jor-El (Marbella, Spain) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Wolfman (2010) - Extended Cut Limited Edition Steelbook [Blu-ray] [Region Free] (Blu-ray)
A lot of people dont like this movie and no amount of picture improvement, sound enhancement or special features will persuade them to change their mind. However, if you are one of the people who enjoyed this movie then prepare to be dazzled by what has to be one of the best blu rays i've yet seen. The picture quality is superb, with a far greater impression of detail, much better than seeing it at the cinema.
the sound is equally improved, obvious in the louder scenes, but it's the quieter moments where it really shines. this is a particularly mumbly film with a particularly mumbly star, and on standard dvd it is likely you can miss some of the dialogue. not so with the blu, which still manages to keep the volume of the quieter moments the same, but is able to deliver them much more clearly,
fans of the film do not hesitate to buy, you wont be disappointed.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 217 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Only search this product's reviews