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4.6 out of 5 stars
The Incredibles [Blu-ray] [2004] [Region Free]
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
on 13 July 2005
I expected the Incredibles to be impressive on the visual side of things. I was not disappointed in those respects. I was even more suprised that an animated mainstream film from Disney was as knowing, well writen and even original as any live action film.
I thought that the take on superhero themes is refreshing. The Incredibles draws from the superhero comics heritage from the 60's to the cynicism of postmodernist sentiments from the Simpsons. Superheroes have been made to go into civilian life and refrain from any heroic activity because of the cost of lawsuits to the economy made by ungrateful rescued people. Mr Incredible cant help helping good citizens by approving their insurance claims.
The parts about the new lives of the Parr family is an welcomed change of focus and pace in my opinnion. It all makes the action later more dynamic. But watching a cgi family bicker about how boring thier lives are is strangely fascinating because it is so believable, without trying to copy realife.
The action scenes are varied and clever. There's enough crash and bang, that stand up to the likes of Jurrasic Park and Starwars. More importantly is the capital the film makes from the abilites of Elastimum, who's more versatile than a survival expert with a bundle of sticks, her performances 'stretch' the possibilites of what could be acheived in live action evrn with CGI.
The art and design of big animated films is often passed of as being 'great graphics'. As an animation student there is a true appreciation of the difficulties of working in the medium. The commentaries make no few words about this point. Most people should go away with the unique quality and detail that the Incredibles has in its presentation. The characters have a claymation, Wallace and Gromit quality to them. The sets are the best I've seen. Even the ending credits are animated. In short fantastic. Pixar has done good.
The Incredibles has a lot to answer to Marvel's Fantanstic Four, which is coming out soon. I think Incredibles will probably be the better film.
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86 of 90 people found the following review helpful
on 27 June 2011
Just received this in the post this morning after pre ordering. Major disappointment is the only way i can explain how i feel about this disc and with Disney for their treatment of their uk customers. Ok the disc only cost £12, and for that you do get an excellent picture and sound experience, but the fact that 99% of the extra features from the original DVD are now missing and most of the new features that i understand are in the American version of the disc have not been included is a real shame. Why should i have to keep changing between the standard definition DVD edition of the film and the high def on the blu-ray? For all those people that say i should have imported the 4 disc set from the US, why should i? i would have happily have paid more money for the extra features in hi-def, but Disney in their all powerful, all knowing dictatorship of a company decided to remove my right to choose. In future i will not pre-order any discs from Disney or maybe just stick to buying their films on DVD as you seem to get better value for money.
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30 of 32 people found the following review helpful
...let down by a cut-and-paste effort with the special features. Reading through what's available on the 4-disc US release (2 blu/1 DVD/1 digital copy) we're missing 3 discs of stuff. Digital copies don't matter that much, nor do DVD versions, but to be missing the 2nd blu-ray smacks of utter contempt to UK customers.

Yes, the UK version may well have SOME of the US bonus features. But not all of them. Nor does it port over any of the classic DVD features - yet EVERY Disney release previously does! What gives?

To be short-changed to such an extent is a real disappointment, saved only by the film and its excellent HD presentation. Boo hiss boo, Disney. Boo hiss boo.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 2 July 2011
This is my favourite Pixar movie and by some margin. All of the studio's films are a cut above: in terms of both story and presentation. However, if there's one criticism that could be levelled at them, it's that hitherto their formula could be loosely described as 'misfits on a quest'.

Enter Brad Bird, a writer-director whose previous effort, the vastly underrated The Iron Giant, demonstrated that good characterisation can transcend a limited budget. Although championed by John Lasseter, Bird's arrival was looked on askance by Disney executives and Pixar staff alike as he set about constructing something new. The running time was increased to two hours, which allowed for a deeper narrative structure. What emerged was a part-domestic drama, part-comic book homage that has a very stylised look and is consistently entertaining.

The Incredibles is about a superhero family who are unable to live the life they once did. If there's one thing that defines America more than overeating and gun ownership, it's that lawyers have evolved into a distinct species who can spot a no win-no fee case if someone's wearing the wrong shirt. (That may be a generalisation but so long as they look on our crooked teeth as if it's a rabies symptom, I feel I'm allowed to make it.) What were once acts of superhuman kindness have become an inconvenience to the point of litigation. As a result, 'supers' are forced to live among the populace incognito, shunned by the society they once protected.

From this setting, some interesting themes develop from the character dynamics. Husband, wife, brother and sister respectively embody frustration, acceptance, confidence and diffidence; meanwhile the antagonist's motivation stems from massive insecurity. If the film has a message, it's "Be all that you can be."

As a Pixar Blu-ray, it's de rigueur for the image to be perfect and it is. Some have bemoaned the lack of extras compared to the two-disc DVD and it's for that reason only that I'm deducting a star. However, you still get two audio commentaries, a couple of Pixar shorts and a twenty-minute roundtable retrospective from the film's creators.
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47 of 51 people found the following review helpful
on 5 May 2011
This is a fantastic film - one of Pixar's best and as good as the Toy Story films in my view (high praise indeed!)

However for the upcoming blu-ray release Disney UK appears to have decided to release a single disc version with minimal extras. The recent US version was a four(yes four) disc set. It included the now obligatory digital copy and DVD version of the film which seems to be one of Disney's selling points (Buy ANOTHER DVD copy of a film you have already!) But the package also includes an additional blu-ray disc with 8 hours of extras. What do UK buyers get? Looks like a single disc without even all the extras that were on the 2 disc DVD. If Disney UK want to continue selling blu-ray's maybe they should ask their friends in the US office for a few tips as it seems to be better value to import titles from the US than to make do with the UK hatchet job on offer.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Pixar just gores from strength to strength. The animation studio responsible for Toy Story, Monsters Inc and Finding Nemo has out done themselves for this film. The Incredibles is the story of a family of Superheroes who must live among the general population in fear of law suits. When Bob Parr loses his job he gets a mysterious communication that asks him to resume his super identity of Mr Incredible. The Incredibles is a great film, well made and has a brilliant script that should keep you entertained throughout. The has been heavily influenced by existing superhero comics, especially the Fantastic 4 and actually outclasses the Fantastic 4 live action film in every way. Of the special features the best has to be the short piece of animation Jack-Jack Attack which shows what happened with the youngest member of the Parr family while the family were saving the world. The Incredibles should be enjoyable by most people's standards but especially Sci-Fi fans.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
There are two crowds with this movie. Those who think it was OK, and those who think it is brilliant. Few dislike it.
My thoughts here are strong -- Brilliant, and then some.
"The Incredibles" is the beginning of a new era of superhero movies. It pokes at the genre, and it tells a fantastic story in the process. More than a parody, it has a rich pro-family flavor, folded into a drama about relationships, yet never taking itself too seriously.
The Plot
Take a couple with superpowers, move them into a federal protection program after superheroes are sued, give them three kids who aren't allowed to use their powers, and wait. Prod them occasionally with anxiety and restlessness to keep them in minor trouble. Soon, a powerful, intelligent enemy bent on becoming a self-made messiah will come along.
Will the retired and in-hiding superheroes don the uniforms and save the day? Can they after all these years? Who is this amazing arch enemy?
Does my version of the plot tell as well as it works in the movie? Probably not, because what is missing is the funny sight gags, situation humor, and spectacular animation. You also don't hear the swift one-liners, allusions to classic comic books or sarcasm about society.
The movie soars farther than the average superhero movie because, like Spiderman, it looks into the reality of the kind of personal life a superhero would have. If a world with superheroes existed, what would it be like? While the X-Men movies have attempted to address this, the concept of Charles Xavier's mansion is not easy to believe. Thinking that after Mr. Incredible unretired, he would have a beer gut is believable. These superheroes are just like us, after all, only "super."
The art and design of "The Incredibles" is not the usual either. Calling it art may seem too much, and I don't want to suggest that this is an animated version of the Louvre. However, "The Incredibles" angles beyond comic book art, and into art deco, and pop art akin to a more sophisticated, moving Andy Warhol.
The messages in the movie encourage us to be ourselves, be humble, do the right thing, and, in the case of peril, be courageous.
I fully recommend "The Incredibles." I am looking for a sequel or two, and am hoping they can continue this style and quality.
Anthony Trendl
editor, HungarianBookstore.com
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 25 March 2006
It's not every animated movie that deals with midlife crisis, marital dysfunction, child neglect, impotence fears, fashion faux pas and existential angst. But The Incredibles -- the latest in the line of miracles from Pixar (A Bug's Life, Toy Story 1 and 2, Finding Nemo) -- is not like any animated movie you've ever seen. While delivering the goods as a rip-roaring action-adventure and in the process rocketing the art of animation to new heights of imagination, humor and wonder, director-writer Brad Bird has crafted a film that breaks fresh ground and defies fogy rules. For starters, there's no talking fish, insects or toys. Bird -- who cut his satirical teeth working on The Simpsons and the criminally underseen 1999 feature The Iron Giant -- animates human beings.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on 11 January 2005
My son is 7 and we went to see it because it was the latest film out ,I wasn't particularly bothered about seeing it but all the kids were talking about it at school.I'd made up my mind that I was just going to enjoy the time to relax , the film was fantastic though and my son would have sat and watched it again straight away.Its a must in this household on DVD.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Superheroes used to span the globe, saving people from all sorts of calamities and stopping numerous supervillains from taking over the world. However, after an incident in which Mr. Incredible saved someone who didn’t want to be saved and the superheroes were sued for not only that but all the collateral damage their superheroic exploits caused, the government forced the superheroes to go into hiding and created a superhero relocation program for them.

Now, many years later, Mr. Incredible is married to Elastigirl, has three superpowered kids, and is just trying to lead a quiet domestic life while also being unable to help himself but sneak out now and then to do good deeds for people along with his buddy Frozone. When an opportunity arises from a private party for him to once again don his tights, Mr. Incredible jumps at the chance and gets to be a hero once more. The only problem is this private party is not who they seem and has a deadly agenda against not just Mr. Incredible but against all former superheroes.

The bonds of family and friendship are tested to their limits as Mr. Incredible must try and stop this threat without getting his family involved.

Except, it might already be too late for that.

Wow.

Every so often a superhero movie comes along that does everything right. Great characters, great story, great presentation. In the case of animation, great voice talent, a great tale, great effects, great rendering. The Incredibles is an utterly amazing movie and is in the top ten superhero flicks of all time. In my personal top five, easy, and very close to the number one spot.

This movie hits all the high notes on every level. Superhero action? Check. Awesome heroes and an A-plus villain? Check. Completely relatable characters? Check. A solid story with an interesting plot? Check. A stellar cast? Check.

Ah, where to begin? That’s the thing with this movie: there is so much right with it that it’s hard to decide where to start.

Okay, how about looking at a superhero story without the super heroics? Before you throw stones because I know there’s lots of superhero-ing in this movie, the majority of it doesn’t have that stuff, but instead focuses on the lives of a family of superpowered people and what they have to go through to keep their powers a secret thanks to the government making it illegal for superpowered individuals to show themselves. You got Bob Parr (Craig T. Nelson), who’s just itching to relive the glory days and finally does albeit covertly; you got the homemaker wife, Helen (Holly Hunter), who’s just trying to hold down the fort against a husband she discovers is out gallivanting with his buddy (Lucius Best aka Frozone played by Samuel L. Jackson) while also juggling kids; Dash Parr (Spencer Fox), who’s frustrated he’s got to keep his superspeed under wraps; Violet Parr (Sarah Vowell), who’s frustrated in being in a family that can’t be who they truly are; Jack Jack (Eli Fucile and Maeve Andrews), well, he’s just a baby and does baby stuff . . . but with a super flare, of course. Throw in a supervillain who’s motivation for being one is totally plausible—proving himself to the one hero who let him down—and, yeah, the heart of this movie lies in the people versus just simple superhero action.

When it does come time for the Parrs to don their new gear and become the superteam the Incredibles, they take all that character development with them and bring it to the streets as they fight Syndrome (Jason Lee) and put a stop to his evil plans.

What’s great, too, about this flick is the immense amount of world-building thanks to the backstory as to how the heroes—or the “supers” as they are called in the flick—used to be all over the place and then how and why they were suddenly banned from doing their job with Bob right in the middle of it. It was actually his case of saving someone from suicide that caused the whole thing. (And suicide, by the way, a pretty dark subject for a kids movie.) You also got to see many of the other heroes that inhabit the Incredibles’s universe, giving you a sense of scope that adds to the believability of the story and enhances the character depth even more.

Thematically, this movie is about many things, some of which are dealing with poor self-esteem, sacrifice, being true to who you are, doing the right thing at all costs and, at its heart, the strength of family against all odds.

The Incredibles is a movie that is highly recommended, a genuine timeless classic, and there have been rumors of a sequel for years. Director/writer Brad Bird has hinted at it repeatedly, but is also waiting for the right story to come along. To be honest, a part of me hopes a sequel doesn’t happen because I understand the power of a good solo flick and how hard it is to do a follow up that tops the original. At the same time, we seem to have come to a place in superhero cinema where the sequel often is better than the first.

What do you think?

While you mull that over, go back and watch The Incredibles again.

And again.

And again.
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