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43 of 44 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great place to start with Neil Young
Thoroughly outstanding from start to finish, this is vintage Neil Young. Harder-edged than the follow-up (and more famous) "Harvest", "After The Gold Rush" contains some classic tracks, including the bitter 'Southern Man', Young's vicious swipe at racist attitudes in America's Deep South, which spawned an equally famous retort by Southern rock legends Lynyrd Skynyrd...
Published on 23 Jan 2004 by Touring Mars

versus
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Three Stars
not as good as Harvest
Published 1 month ago by city6161


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43 of 44 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great place to start with Neil Young, 23 Jan 2004
By 
Touring Mars (London, UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: After The Gold Rush (Audio CD)
Thoroughly outstanding from start to finish, this is vintage Neil Young. Harder-edged than the follow-up (and more famous) "Harvest", "After The Gold Rush" contains some classic tracks, including the bitter 'Southern Man', Young's vicious swipe at racist attitudes in America's Deep South, which spawned an equally famous retort by Southern rock legends Lynyrd Skynyrd ('Sweet Home Alabama'). Obviously Neil Young didn't get the hint, since 'Alabama' (on Harvest) was equally scathing, albeit not as powerful as the brilliant 'Souhtern Man'. Young's legendarily off-beat, jagged solo guitar style was pretty much born on this track, and ensures that it will hold a special place in any Neil Young collection.
"Only Love Can Break Your Heart" is a Young country standard, practically unparalleled in the rest of his career. With a real country 3/4 beat, and beautiful harmony vocals (presumably by, amongst others, Danny Whitten), it's almost a mournful lament of a song. (Later covered by St. Etienne to great effect on 'Fox Base Alpha')
Other highlights include the brilliant opener, "Tell Me Why", which really sets the scene for what you can expect from the rest of the album. "Don't Let It Bring You Down" is another top track, although lyrically a bit confused. Also, "When You Dance You Can Really Love" is musically a great song, but what the hell he's on about is a matter of debate! But it only goes to show that even if one part of a song is lacking, it is compensated by the sheer quality of another part. The result is that there isn't a weak song on the album. Even Young's cover version of country standard "Oh Lonesome Me" is thoroughly appropriate and fits right in with the rest of the album. Like the title track on the follow-up "Harvest", "After The Gold Rush" is a simple piano ballad showcasing Young at his most reflective and laid-back, and contains a great lyric which includes "Look at Mother Nature on the run, in the 1970's"
This was my first Neil Young album (I bought it because I had 'Fox Base Alpha' by St. Etienne!), and what a place to start. I loved it then and more than a decade later, it remains one of my top ten favourite albums of all-time. More so than "Everybody Knows This Is Nowhere" or prior albums, "After The Gold Rush" marks the true beginning of Neil Young the "legend", and no CD collection can be complete without it.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars If They Could All Be Like This, 10 Feb 2011
By 
D. J. Roberts (Hertfordshire, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: After The Gold Rush (Audio CD)
There probably aren't too many casual looks at this treasure unfortunately. It's an album that many of the current crop of "singer/songwriters" could do with listening to. Well worth a punt for anybody.

To those who know the record, I bought this cd on its'first release. Personally, I have never heard it sound so good. I could wax on about all sorts, but the bottom line is if you like or love this collection of songs you have to buy this edition to hear them in a depth and swathe of detail I'm sure many of us won't have heard before, even on the vinyl which was good. I'm drawing a breath, but have come to the conclusion that this sounds better than my first (British) press original vinyl - not a memory, I continue to play and enjoy vinyl. I'm sure Neil Young was waiting for the digital technology to catch up and he has been proved right to wait. Superlative.

Lights out, volume up and you have Neil Young and band in your room. And you are in the room as they recorded the music; you can picture where each of them stood to do their parts. Top class.

The above comments also apply equally well to "Harvest".
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars After the Gold Rush IS a classic. Superior to Harvest., 21 May 2011
By 
Troels Stampe Johansen "T. S. Johansen" (Hvornum, Denmark) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: After The Gold Rush (Audio CD)
Having heard Harvest prior to After the Gold Rush, I thought I'd heard what Neil Young had to offer. Boy was I wrong.
After the Gold Rush features some of Young's greatest folk music, as well as some really great rockers that are far superior to the rock songs on Harvest. There, already I've stated what is the real purpose of this review: After the Gold Rush is better than Harvest, by a mile... or two.
"Tell Me Why" opens up the album nicely. It's catchy, but absolutely not one of the best on the album. This immediately changes on the following song, also the title song, which is an extremely beautiful acoustic folk song. And this is where Neil Young really shines. The title song is not the only acoustic deserve-to-be-classic song on the album. "Don't let it bring you Down" and "Birds" are some of the asolute best songs, I've heard from Neil Young, and it is not difficult to see why the singer/songwriter-genre has turned out to be so popular since.
Neil Young seems to be the first singer/songwriter to really give this much of himself. It's deeply personal and the lyrics are simply masterpieces.
But Young doesn't stop here. Whereas most musicians and bands have trouble mastering only one genre, Neil Young shows that he is also a master of country-rock. "Southern Man" manages to keep the personality of his folk songs, but in a rock package with awesome country/blues-solos.

On the last notes, I'll encourage you all to start out by listening to Harvest (if you're new to Young), as that is Young at his most catchy and straightforward. But it's with Harvest's predecessor, After the Gold Rush, that Neil Young's talent and potential truly shines. A masterpiece, and after only a few listens, one of my all-time favourite albums.
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22 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Beautiful music, 10 May 2007
This review is from: After The Gold Rush (Audio CD)
I think that Neil Young as an artist is slightly overrated, and some of his most praised albums like Zuma and especially Tonight's the Night I don't really care for...

But this record is a different matter. I still remember the day when I bought it; on the first listen it was sort of OK, but then on the same night I put it on again and listened to it (via headphones); only then it really started to make an impact on me, and I just couln't stop listening - I didn't get much sleep that night, let me tell you!

This is one of those rare albums where "every song is better than the next". Even the songs that could be called throwaways, like just-over-a-minute-long Till the Morning Comes and Cripple Creek Ferry, have great warmth and beauty in them (I especially love the backing choir of the former - pure magic!).

If you are into Young's rock side, this might not be the right record for you, but for the fans of simple, beautiful and heartfelt music it is a must-have.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars get massey hall as well!, 24 Jun 2007
By 
C. Gorman "chrisgpix" (NZ) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: After The Gold Rush (Audio CD)
Yes this is possibly his best studio album, but as well as this any Neil Young fan should also have "Live at Massey Hall" as well. which is basically some of these songs and songs from Harvest stripped bare, no backing muscians no nothing, just Neil and his guitar/piano. Get both! you owe it to yourself, see it as a little treat!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sublime!, 21 Oct 2008
By 
Mr. J. T. P. Goode (Cornwall, UK.) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: After The Gold Rush (Audio CD)
This album was on constant play throughout an American road-trip of mine in a camper van from festival to festival, state to state, gradually heading westward to California. I was 18 at the time and the year was 1989. The start of the journey began at the Woodstock festival, twenty years on, (opened with a speech from Jimi Hendrix's father and a set by Richie Havens). As a consequence it is drenched in memories.

This album has it all. Steeped in the golden glow of the times, it covers many areas of being, heartache, visions, psychedelic thoughts, glimpses of pastoral idylls, all set within a hybrid of folk/country/rock that is distinctively Neil's own. His thin nasally voice is perfect throughout, the harmonies sublime, the quality of recording simultaneously sparse and lush in a way that you never find on digital media these days.

A classic, a slice of time frozen. If you only ever get one Neil Young album in your life, get this one. It's his best, and goes in my top ten favourite albums of all time.
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23 of 26 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "...Morning Brings Another Sun...", 15 Aug 2009
By 
Mark Barry "Mark Barry" - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: After The Gold Rush (Audio CD)
As we all know, Neil Young has famously resisted the remastered reissue of his huge catalogue on CD because of what he feels is the format's less than stellar representation of analogue tapes' 'original sound' - and almost a full 20 years after 1989's first issue of "Gold Rush" on a dullard CD - it looks like the guy is having the last laugh - because this meticulously prepared tape transfer is GLORIOUS. It really is.

First to the details - "After The Gold Rush" was released in September 1970 on Reprise Records MS 6383 in the USA and RSLP 6383 in the UK (it went to Number 8 in the USA and Number 7 in the UK). This 2009 NYA OSR remaster (Neil Young Archives - Original Release Series) is Disc 3 of 4 and carries the HDCD code on the label and rear inlay (High Density Compact Disc). Until now, 2004's "Greatest Hits" set (which offered us three Gold Rush tracks remastered into HDCD sound quality) was the only real indication of just how good the album 'could' sound (this is the first time the 'entire' album has been given a sonic upgrade). The Audio Tape Restoration and Analog-To-HDCD Digital Transfer of the Original Master Tapes was carried out by JOHN NOWLAND (24-Bit 176 KHZ) with the Editing and Mastering done by TIM MULLIGAN - and they've done a stunning job.

The inlay faithfully reproduces the foldout lyric sheet with his black and white grainy handwritten lyrics and the print isn't cramped either - it's very readable. (The Harvest inlay has the textured feel of the original LP sleeve and lyric insert too - a nice touch).

Also - as these are the first four albums in a long reissue campaign - to identify them from the old CDs, the upper part of the outer spine has his new NYA OSR logo at the top and an 'issue' number beneath - D1, D2, D3, D4...on upwards of course.

However, the big and obvious disappointment is the complete lack of musical extras or any new info in the booklet; they're in "The Archives Vol.1 1963-1972" box set that's still sitting in shop windows at varying extortionate prices. Still - at mid price - this remaster of "Gold Rush" is great value for money and with this hugely upgraded sound - it makes you focus on the music as is and not anything else.

Some have complained that the sound is a little underwhelming after all the hype that has preceded these releases - I don't think that at all. The danger in remastering would be the cranking of everything, ultra-treble the lot - but I'm hearing ALL the instruments on this carefully prepared remaster - especially the bass and drums which now have a clarity that is so sweet rather than flashy. The sound is very subtle - there's no brashness, very little hiss. So many highlights - the meaty guitars of "Southern Man" and the slyly lovely cover of Don Gibson's "Oh Lonesome Me" is great too. But then there's a triple whammy of "Don't Let It Bring You Down", the beautiful "Birds" (lyrics above) and the rocking "When You Dance, I Can Really Love". Each is so beautifully done but in different ways. They're not bombastic, nor trebled up to the nines, but subtle - the music is just THERE in your speakers to a point where everything seems new and up for grabs again. Fans will love it and feel like they're revisited long cherished old friends while newcomers will now understand what all the 5-star fuss is about.

The gold sticker on the jewel case of each of these issues states - "Because Sound Matters" - and although it took him a few decades, on the strength of this reissue, I think Rock's great curmudgeon was right to wait to get it right...which in many respects is the ultimate nod to his fans.

Highly recommended.

PS: I've reviewed "Harvest" and "Everybody Knows This Is Nowhere" also - just as good soundwise...
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16 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Let it sink in and then get the rest of his back catalogue!!, 31 Dec 2000
This review is from: After The Gold Rush (Audio CD)
First of all, i was disappointed by the fact that the album is not very long (about 35 mins). However, when i actually listened to the album, i was not disappointed at all. The songs are so timeless, it is posible to listen to them lots of times after one another and they do not get boring. It is such a strong album. It is a great mix of country and rock, a mix of Everybody Knows This Is Nowhere (brilliant too) and Harvest (excellent). Tell Me Why is a melancholy opener followed up by one of the greatest tracks Neil has done. Actually, now i think about it, all of the tracks are excellent. There are rockers showing off Neil's skill on the guitar and there are quiet, reflective tracks. 'Oh Lonesome Me' has one of the best harmonies i have heard and 'Southern Man' is acidic and a great rock track.
This album is, along with Harvest, the best way to introduce yourself to the work of Neil Young. As i said, get this, and you will soon be getting all of his albums!!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Musical landmark, 5 Jun 2009
By 
J. A. Harvey (Lincolnshire, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: After The Gold Rush (Audio CD)
If 'Everybody Knows This Is Knowhere' was the first step in Young's one take only approach to recording, this album embraces the concept like no other, along with a punk style contempt for accomplished musicianship and fussy production. On this album Neil stripped away all the studio tricks, he even asked young Crazy Horse guitarist Nils Lofgren to play piano on the title track. When Lofgren said he didn't play piano, Young assured him it didn't matter. Incredibly the simplicity of the keyboards on the track suits the song perfectly.

But regardless of the production values, the quality of the songs show remarkable artistic growth and it is easy to see why it achieved classic status. You can also understand why Stephen Stills, David Crosby and Graham Nash were a bit miffed at the sheer quality of some of the music; Young was a quarter of CSNY at this time, yet nothing he contributed to that band would have made the final cut on 'Goldrush'.

If I could change anything about thits record it would be to add harmonica to the mix. Some of the songs are crying out for it like a thirsty man cries out for water, yet the only track it was used on was 'Oh Lonesome Me', (very appropriately) and this as far as I am aware was the instrument's debut on a Neil Young record. But 'Harvest' was just around the corner, and the 'Dylan-Kit' was about to have its moment in the sun. Goldrush may not have been his biggest selling record, or even his best, but this was Neil's contribution to the high table of rock classics.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Review, 5 Mar 2008
This review is from: After The Gold Rush (Audio CD)
Neil Young after the Gold Rush

Neil Young has made so many albums now, some of them terrible, but some an inspiration for generations of today and the future alike. After the Gold Rush is one, if not the best album he has done. It was after the Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young period that he created this almost masterpiece like third album. The album fits nicely into the genre of Country/ Rock with a mix of warm acoustic love songs to the anti-racial protest song of Southern Man.

The opening track, Tell Me Why, is just Neil, his Martin D-28 acoustic and a few backing singers. Still with this thin arrangement he manages to make the recording sound as thick as a full orchestra playing to their limit. It is a story of love and how a young girl can not make up her mind about her life.
The second track and one of the highlights of the album is the dreamlike and emotional, after the Gold Rush. A story of protest with a `post war' like trumpet solo that has to be one of the most tear jerking sounds ever recorded. Neil's thin country voice floats seamlessly on top of an aesthetically perfect Recording.

The fourth track on the album, Southern Man, is an eccentric Rock/ blues protest song about the state of racial abuse in the Redneck area of America. With lines such as `I see your black man coming round, swear by God I'm gonna cut him down. I heard Screaming and bull whips cracking.' A brutal attack on the Rednecks in South America.

Overall an incredibly versatile album. The best he has done.

5 stars
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