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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A major step forward in psychodynamic understanding of our relationship to our body
This is a very well written, clear and above all clinically useful book. It is an important contribution to a strangely neglected field - we know too little about how we relate to our bodies and are often puzzled about how others appear to relate to theirs. Clients who use their bodies to communicate with us about how they feel about themselves and how they feel in...
Published on 18 Sep 2010 by P. Fonagy

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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Valuable insight but takes a heteronormative position on sexuality
The book would benefit from broader thinking on sexuality. Psychoanalytic thinking needs to move on from heteronormative accounts of the relationhips between mother/father-child and the "desires" inherent in those dyads/triads. On Chapter 1 - As you desire me - page 33, the author writes:

"Importantly, at the intersection of the first stirrings of desire, the...
Published on 15 April 2012 by CP


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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A major step forward in psychodynamic understanding of our relationship to our body, 18 Sep 2010
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P. Fonagy "Presenter" (London, GB) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This is a very well written, clear and above all clinically useful book. It is an important contribution to a strangely neglected field - we know too little about how we relate to our bodies and are often puzzled about how others appear to relate to theirs. Clients who use their bodies to communicate with us about how they feel about themselves and how they feel in relation to us provides crucial insight into this most profound of relationships that has primacy over all others. Lemma's book is filled with intriguing detail about this fascinating topic and is a highly enjoyable and also moving read.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Under the Skin, 18 July 2010
This book is well written and makes interesting reading in the therapeutic context which it seeks to explain imposed body modification, by virtue of its title.

The case histories are well documented, concise, and illuminating; they are very interesting from a psychoanalytic perspective.

As a therapist this book has informed and supported my understanding of this subject area.

I would encourage all those in the helping professions to read this publication
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Valuable insight but takes a heteronormative position on sexuality, 15 April 2012
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The book would benefit from broader thinking on sexuality. Psychoanalytic thinking needs to move on from heteronormative accounts of the relationhips between mother/father-child and the "desires" inherent in those dyads/triads. On Chapter 1 - As you desire me - page 33, the author writes:

"Importantly, at the intersection of the first stirrings of desire, the little boy and little girl have an asymmetrical experience in relation to the mother. The little boy is, at birth, exposed to the opposite sex. In this sense desire may flow more easily in the dyad... By contrast the little girl, who is not an Oedipal object for the mother, may feel that she simply cannot get enough positive investment in her bodily self, that she cannot elicit the mother's desire enough, if at all, to shore up her quota of desirability. Instead she has to wait for her turn when, and if, her relationship with her father is more accesible to her." (Lemma, 2010)

Sadly, this view is imbued with the heteronormative assumption that the mother, father and child are heterosexual. Even if the constituent elements of a dyad/triad are more polarised towards a heterosexual position within a continuum of sexuality, sexuality is not a fixed state of being and "desire" does not circumscribe itself to the subject/object's gendered/sexual roles. A study on mothers/fathers' desires/fantasies/intrusions towards their children would hopefully illuminate us further.
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1.0 out of 5 stars One Star, 9 Dec 2014
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Ill informed and biased. Poorly written and poorly conceived. Avoid!
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