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4.0 out of 5 stars
One Night In Turin [DVD] [2010]
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon 9 February 2011
I was 17 in 1990; I remember Italia 90 with more fondness than any tournament before or since. I watched virtually every match and it came at a perfect time in my life. And I loved Pete Davies' book, All Played Out (although that now appears to have changed its name to One Night in Turin as well). This, then, is the film of the book.

And the archive footage is put together very well. But why the intrusive and (let's be honest, not very well done) reconstructions? The footage is supplemented by close up shots of feet kicking footballs, snappers taking pictures and, most bizarrely, a pervy reporter leering through a door at a footballer in bed with a page 3 lovely. It's just weird. Gary Oldman's commentary is also strangely laddish when it doesn't need to be. In places it was halfway towards Danny Dyers bosh bosh bosh.

And that is not to say that, overall, it's not highly enjoyable. Particularly if, like me, you are the right age to remember all of this. But the film makers made some really odd choices along the way
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1982 was the earliest world cup I can remember watching but 1990 was when the worlds greatest sporting tournament really hit home for me and its cultural meaning of the times. I had just left school, finished my last exam and the tournament started - I think I watched every match every team played during those 30+days of football.

I cheered, cried and celebrated with every kick of the ball from our boys in white - where it all reaches a head with that 'One night in Turin'. This documentary is quite possibly the best sporting documentary I've ever seen - following England team, key players and Bobby Robson, through the pre-tournament, their build-up, each match too their return home - it used excellent social references of music of the year (Happy Mondays and The Farm to name but two), archive footage of games, interviews, press clippings, news reports, focusing not just on the football matches of England but the treatment of the fans whom were still looked unfairly upon during this era as trouble with a capital T.

This DVD brings all these elements to the forefront to amazing effect - bringing back memories and emotions - it perfectly recreates the feeling, the era, the cultural surroundings and problems faced of 1990 England and the sport which is our favourite past-time. I cant wait for 'From the Ashes' from the same director following the famous 1981 series. Simply superb work from director James Erskine - if you ever get to read this I hope you do a Euro 1996 documentary film as well - where football came home, Britpop was at his height and El Tel nearly led a Gazza inspired England on one final crusade!

PS: Rest in peace Sir Bobby Robson - a true gentleman and such an under rated national manager.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 25 August 2013
I was a kid during during this World Cup, barely in my teens. And frankly I wasn't really that in to football before. But I did watch England play in this tournament. And I was hooked.

The drama twisted my stomach. The players played their hearts out, and they played damn good football too in the games that mattered. The manager, Bobby Robson, was as brilliant and as decent a bloke as I would like to be myself. He was a man I could look up to, and so were many of the players. These people really cared.

Both the players and the manager did the country proud, and made us feel good.

But it is what was achieved on the pitch which was great, and there is very little footage of actual play. I'd guess about ten minutes of England playing in total- could be wrong but that's what it felt like. There's more footage of actors feet reenacting England players than actual footage of the tournament. It's as though they only had a fiver to pay FIFA for footage and had to make up the rest with actors legs.

And this movie is quite political too for some reason, quite left wing in parts. And this makes no sense because England supporters are a mix of people who have their own individual political opinions.

There is far too much description of the football and not nearly enough actual football.

Very, very disappointing.
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
on 1 June 2010
Ultimately I felt let down after seeing this. A lot of it is good, there is some great archive footage in addition to the stuff you'll see replayed every few years on TV. There are some good interviews from during Italia 90 with Bobby Robson and the players, some good footage of training sessions and players relaxing by the pool or playing golf. The scene is also quite nicely set against the backdrop of the so called hooligan problem which includes some enlightening interviews from the time with fans and police.

What ruined it for me mostly was that they felt the need to intersperse their footage with reconstructions of some of the incidents. As if the drama isn't compelling enough from watching action from the game we are subjected to watching close ups of actors legs as they mimic some of the action. It's almost like the director is trying to copy the 1986 FIFA film, Hero. Against Cameroon in the quarter final, Lineker is brought down for a penalty, but rather than see the actual footage the moment is poorly recreated by some actors! It's Baddiel and Skinner "Phoenix From the Flames" stuff. In the semi final, Chris Waddle hits a shot from near the halfway line which is tipped onto the bar by German keeper Bodo Illgner, at which point the action cuts to treat us to a replica ball hitting a replica post.

During the scenes of rioting on the streets it is felt that the viewer needs a close up reconstruction of a glass smashing on the ground and, just to be doubly sure we feel the aggression, there are some actors pretending to be hooligans waving their arms round and gesticulating. Oh and of course there are some actors pretending to be journalists rubbing their hands together in smoky rooms at their next evil plot. One even manages to spy at the door of a player (an actor) in bed with a woman we presume he shouldn't be.

If you can't quite grasp the tension that would have been felt watching the games at the time, then you will love watching some actors pretending to relive watching the action in a bar.

If only the reconstructed scenes weren't in it, it would be reasonable. The narration from Gary Oldman isn't bad but his script is pretty uninspiring.

There are some niggling errors in it too, the stuff that should have been easily spotted before it was released. For example the date of England's first game is given as 21st June which left me surprised the tournament started so late - until they gave the date of the second game as 16th June. Oh, and Lineker is spelt as "Linekar" on the back cover. Am I being picky? How was that not spotted?

"The definitive story of Italia 90"? Not a chance. It's not even the "inside story" it claims to be as there are only interviews from the time which were in the public domain. Don't expect any new insight. It's entertaining but only for the nostalgia; it could have been a lot better.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on 2 June 2010
I thoroughly enjoyed One Night in Turin. Sentimental in places, perhaps, but for a just turned 30 something who's first memories of a football tournament come from Italia '90, it brought back some great memories. I particularly enjoyed the behind the scenes excerpts, which give a fascinating insight into the culture of the squad and team management. Also to see Bobby Robson in his prime, full of fight and gusto, just like we all want to remember him, was great! The reconstructions may grate some, but they only truly form a very small part of an overall excellent documentary. In summary, Gazza's fallen brilliance, Robson's plucky pride and just a single kick away from the Word Cup Final. For me, this was the perfect way to get in the mood for South Africa!
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on 16 May 2014
I enjoyed One Night in Turin, but throughout was jarred by the additional footage shoehorned in of actors representing fans and media. Original film of the 1990 tournament is abundant, as anyone visiting YouTube will know, so there is really no need for the added scenes of scribes scribbling, fans swigging and photographers clicking which are inserted into practically every scene. Every time one of these unnecessary segments played, I was taken out of the moment by people who hadn't even been given haircuts, never mind clothing, representative of the time. If you're going to make a documentary about one of the most iconic World Cups ever (for England fans, at least), you need to at least ensure that you don't intersperse it with clips of people with very 2000s haircuts and facial hair.

On the whole, though, it was a watchable hour and a half or so, but not something I'll be rushing to watch again. Gary Oldman may have been brought in to add a little gravitas (they could have done far worse), but throughout he seemed a narrator in search of an identity. At times we were going down the lad/tabloid route with the rather strange use of nicknames seemingly made up on the spot - did I imagine it, or was Gascoigne referred to on several occasions as "Puck"? - while at other times we were getting social commentary on the final throes of Thatcherism and her out of touch government's inability to understand ordinary people.

What One Night in Turn did do, however, was remind us of how narrow are the differences between success and failure, and the viciousness and self importance of the tabloid press. It also gave context to a tournament that had to be experienced at the time to be fully appreciated. There is plenty of footage of the summer of 1990 available online, and someone dedicated enough could create their own film of the available clips which, in the right hands, would probably be a lot better than this. But as a light piece of evening's entertainment, One Night in Turn isn't bad. It's just not as good as it ought to have been.
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on 3 June 2013
Once upon a time.... England went to a World Cup. Rather true to form they didn't win it. In fact they got knocked out on penalties, but that didn't stop it from being probably the best sporting tournament I've ever witnessed. This is a documentary of that campaign..
All of the previous reviews, with comments both positive and negative, have summed this up well, so I'll keep this brief.
There's an absolute glut of press and sporting interviews and news footage, from both just before and during England's World Cup campaign in Italy in 1990. The soundtrack contains a lot of popular music from the period, and the angle the narration favours is from a 'male, working class football fans' perspective. Narrated by Oldman, and interspersed with bits of reconstruction footage to give you something to look at, when it's discussing the dastardly press etc. There's footage of crowd trouble and some of the action from the games, which it keeps relatively brief, so that it can pluck at our heartstrings with nostalgia and individual portraits of some of the players and the manager.
Ultimately it does it's job well and I had a great deal of memories come flooding back to me.
In the end, I'm almost ashamed to say, that I'd forgotten just how magnificent Shilton, Gazza etc were in that tournament, who it was that first consoled Chris Waddle after THAT miss, and finally just how alarmingly massive, spectacles were in 1990!!
If you hold that tournament in high esteem, or are remotely interested in England at international level, you'd be silly not to give this a watch.
4/5
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on 28 September 2012
So who is James Irskine? A bit of research tells me that his background is largely in television, directing such gems as Eastenders, Holby City and Waterloo Road. Any directing skills which he may have exhibited in these programmes have turned One Night In Turin into One Hell Of A Missed Opportunity.

England's involvement in the 1990 World Cup is the object of this particular exercise and there is no reason to doubt that this is an interesting subject for a documentary; a two star documentary in fact. There is some interesting (and uninteresting), archive footage here, much of it concentrating on Bobby Robson, the team and the idiots (Colin Moynihan, journalists and hooligans). This is enlightening yes, but hang on, isn't the World Cup about football?

Of course it is but we don't actually get to see much of it at all. What we do see is so badly edited and intercut with so much rubbish that it becomes almost unwatchable. We get stills and dreadful, unnecessary and repetitive reconstructions (Even the riot scenes are intercut with constant shots of glass breaking against a wall). This is how it goes: player kicks ball, cut to reconstructed close up of foot kicking ball. This happens so many times that it becomes incredibly tiresome.

This type of editing completely wrecks the suspense which Gary Oldman's narrative does its best to produce. Worse, some of the goals are not even seen; we just see a reconstruction of the ball striking the back of the net. With the last and most important kick of the tournament (another missed opportunity), Irskine holds on the reaction of the player and while we certainly feel for him, we soon become desperate to see the actual miss, which we never do. The emotions following this are so poorly handled that the end of the film, which should be a completely emotional experience, simply nose-dives into the credits which themselves are accompanied by some pretty inappropriate music.

Factually the film has its merits but it offers no real perspective (which interviews with the players today would have), on England's role in the tournament. If the rubbish were removed, there would have been room for this.

One Night in Turin certainly worth a look but if you want football, you may well be frustrated.

.
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on 7 August 2014
The 90 World Cup was special for me. It was the first World Cup that I watched live on TV. Of course the fact that England did well helped immensely. I found the tie in between the social issues and the England national team fascination. The documentary keys on the relationship between England's national team and the hooligans who followed them around. The music chosen for the soundtrack is fabulous and takes me right back to summer 1990. A few people have mentioned the new footage produced to add to the archived footage is weak. I didn't find it weak there was just to much of it. How many times do you need to see a glass broken. And some of the "new" football footage is annoying. There are a couple times when the new footage is edited in the middle of a save or a goal and it is plain that just seeing the full archival clip would be best. For example Lineker's goal that tied the Germany game. That was clutch and I wanted to see the full goal and celebration. Flawed but still really good stuff.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on 2 June 2010
One Night In Turin is a `must-watch' as it pairs iconic football footage that hasn't been seen before with sympathetic reconstructions, enabling the viewer to enjoy the whole of Italia '90 all over again.

Not only in One Night In Turin a documentary for football fans, focus being on Sir Bobby Robson and Gazza, it is also a documentary for anyone who remembers the hype and controversy that accompanied football in the 90s and also for anyone who has an interest in what England went through on and off the football pitch.

Narrated by the unmistakable (and enviable) voice of Gary Oldman, One Night In Turin rekindles all the emotions, both good and bad, ever felt about football. The pride at success and the shame at the underhanded tactics both in football and politics.

It was truly enlightening to see the archived footage from off the pitch and shows how one group of men were, for a while at least, the centre of the country's interest and how football should be played, supported and admired.

A truly impressive documentary about a subject that you think you know everything about until a piece of work like this comes a long and you realise there is still so much more to see!

A definite 5/5 and strongly recommended - will undoubtedly get you in that 'World Cup mood'!
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