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208 of 211 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A nigh-on flawless presentation for a true British classic
Anyone who has only ever seen Michael Anderson's definitive 1954 war film on a muddy, soft television transmission or the previous standard definition DVD should prepare themselves to be floored when they sit down to watch this new 1080P Blu-Ray.

The visual presentation is nothing short of perfection, and I do not say such things lightly. To their credit,...
Published on 25 Sept. 2009 by Martin Thomson

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55 of 63 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Great story, great film..........terrible DVD transfer
Don't get me wrong.......I love the story and the film, but the transfer to DVD is a disaster. The black pixelation of the DVD picture (presumably made worse by the film being originally done in black and white) is SO obvious and SO prevalent (and SO annoying) in many scenes (particularly in the "dark" scenes over the dams), that it should never have been released to the...
Published on 22 Jun. 2005 by Kropotkin


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208 of 211 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A nigh-on flawless presentation for a true British classic, 25 Sept. 2009
By 
Martin Thomson (London UK) - See all my reviews
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Anyone who has only ever seen Michael Anderson's definitive 1954 war film on a muddy, soft television transmission or the previous standard definition DVD should prepare themselves to be floored when they sit down to watch this new 1080P Blu-Ray.

The visual presentation is nothing short of perfection, and I do not say such things lightly. To their credit, Optimum have got absolutely EVERYTHING right on this one.

Firstly, the frequent temptation with HD to crop films that were originally shot Academy down to fill a 16:9 frame has been resisted, with the film retaining its full original 1.33:1 aspect ratio, pillar-boxed within the 16:9 frame.

The clarity of the image is so stunning that I cannot imagine they used anything other than the original negative, which would mean that the film would have had to have undergone a full-blown restoration (not cheap!)

Grading is absolutely first rate, with a terrific grey scale and no discernible clipping of white areas of the image. I did notice some slight black crush on very dark jackets, but this may well just be my TV. The image is as sharp as a razor, with the amount of extra detail being revealed nothing short of staggering for a film made over fifty years ago.

Most importantly, this sharpness is entirely natural and I did not detect the slightest bit of artificial processing of any kind; no edge enhancement, no artificial sharpening and no DNR.

The image retains a wonderfully natural, film-like quality with grain present throughout, as it should be, but always mild and controlled, and never bothersome.

They've even left the original, beautifully ornate BBFC censor card on the front, a lovely touch which is much appreciated as it helps transport you immediately back to the time that the film was made (well, it does me, anyway!).

Sound-wise, things aren't quite as impressive. The film is constrained by the inevitable technical limitations of the time, and I suspect by the rather compressed, mid-rangey sound that they used an optical track rather than a superior magnetic one. However, not knowing what sound materials survive on the film, it is not really fair to criticize. The Dolby Digital Stereo 2.0 track (most likely twin-channel Mono) is completely adequate for a film of this period, and as long as you don't go into it expecting a full immersive surround sound mix and accept it for what it is, you shouldn't be disappointed.

Extras wise, there is absolutely squat, unfortunately, not even a trailer, but again expecting reams of bonus features for a film of this vintage (the term 'making-of' hadn't even been invented yet!) is rather unfair. An interview with Richard Todd would have been nice, though.

Finally, for purists who may be worried, don't be... they've left the dog's name alone!
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84 of 87 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The best of British - an impressive film, 19 Dec. 2006
By 
hillbank68 "almac1975" (Fife, Scotland) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Dam Busters [DVD] [1955] (DVD)
This is one of the best of British stiff-upper-lip War films, and pretty faithful to its factual subject. It tells the two stories - of the invention of the bouncing bomb which would do severe damage to the Ruhr dams, and of the raid which used those bombs to inflict that damage - well. Characterisation is good and the performances of Richard Todd as Guy Gibson and, particularly, Michael Redgrave as Barnes Wallis, the inventor, are entirely appropriate and convincing. While the special effects of the raid itself are very much 1954 and now unconvincing, the tests of the bomb are very well depicted and seem true to life. It is perhaps worth knowing that Todd, with John Mills and others one of the archetypal British-military-hero film actors of the 50s, found one scene difficult to play, and that the very last one, when he tells Wallis that he must go away and write to the parents and families of those who did not come back ; difficult because, as a wartime officer himself in reality, he had done that more often than he cared to remember. The film generally carries that stamp of authenticity and, as such, is a good deal more than just an exciting tale. Well worth watching
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25 of 26 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Thank God for British war movies! This is one of the best., 26 May 2000
By 
brucek@tpg.com.au (Canberra, Australia) - See all my reviews
Richard Todd plays a convincing Guy Gibson and casting Michael Redgrave as Barnes Wallis was an excellent choice. A thoroughly entertaining and generally accurate portrayal of how Wallis' conviction that the main Ruhr dams could be breached was carried out. The film includes actual footage of the trials carried out on the English coast. Students of military history, as well as those who simply want a good yarn well told, will enjoy this. (Incidentally, as it is an historical account, I see no reason why references to terms that may be politically-incorrect today need to be erased. If that credo was adopted there would be few accurate historical records available in the year 2000).
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Dambusters is One of the Greats, 18 April 2006
By 
This is one of those films everyone should have in their film library. The story of 2 of World War II's true heroes, for his part in the raid Wing Commander Guy Gibson received the VC, Barnes Wallis on the other hand received little real recognition for the part he played in creating the bomb that made the raid possible.Due to the time this was made there has been no tampering with the story 'Hollywoodising', a thing that has occurred all to often in more recent movies.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Follow the bouncing bomb, 30 Oct. 2009
By 
Brian Connor (Adelaide, Australia) - See all my reviews
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The Dam Busters is a movie I must have seen at least a half a dozen times on TV mainly as a child on weekend afternoons or perhaps a Midday Movie caught on a rare sick day at home in front of the telly. Recollection was of an enjoyable but scratchy old B&W film that must have been on a Z-generation print of a print that had itself been through the wars.

For the most part watching this Blu-Ray release is like having been there in the editing room with the original film elements. It looks great for a lot of the time with a few exceptions. There is a hair or fibre-in-the-gate thing going on during most of one scene, top left corner from memory, and in two or three scenes there is a fine persistent scratch running vertically through the picture - so fine that when you pause on it you don't really see it. It's not horrible but you do wonder how a transfer can get so close to perfect but then these few imperfections are left unattended to. Even the 'stock' film footage scenes look indistinguishable from the rest (there is stock footage in there isn't there?). The sound is strong and clear for a picture of this vintage.

All-in-all I was very happy with the quality of this release. If all Blu-ray releases reached this level of picture quality the medium would be well served. Alas no extra material but where would it come from and who would pay for it! It is pleasing that any company is prepared to make the investment to release a Blu-Ray version of such a classic film whose potential market must surely be dwindling every year.
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86 of 92 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Dam Busters, 11 Oct. 2003
By 
Simon Wainwright (Eltham, victoria Australia) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Dam Busters [DVD] [1955] (DVD)
I have just read the review on the Dam Busters film on your website.
Having read this review I urge people to ignore the comments made by Philip Kemp as being a load of puerile nonsense. Comparing the death of Nigger(Guy Gibson's labrador) to the death of Bambi's Mum,is belittling the men who held this dog as a mascot. Guy Gibson firmly believed that had his crews found out about Nigger's death it would have been seen as bad luck and quite rightly so.
This was not a minor operation. It was a highly technical operation for the day, no radar, they had GEE not quite the same, flying at 100 feet across the channel and over Holland and Germany, and the 60 feet over the lakes to the dams.
In the context of the '40s the term "Nigger" did not have the conotation is has today. Does Philip Kemp fully realise the outside professionl expertise that is called upon in the making of this type of film. One can only do so much within a budget within the two hours allowed. It's a well known fact that film companies tend to embelish heroism and if Philip Kemp cannot recognise this as indicated by his trite statements he should get an education.
I know this film is revered amongst the vast majority of those who are knowledgeable before and after the fact. I would hate to think that a frivilous and sarcastic review would desuade people from buying such a wonderful and gratifying film that honours the participants(Commenwealth aircrew including one American who joined the Canadian Air Force) and a long lasting commeration to RAF Bomber Command and the durability of spirit as exhibited by the British people.
Simon Wainwright
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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The definate War Movie, 6 April 2008
By 
Mr. P. J. R. LEWIS (Llandudno N Wales) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Dam Busters [DVD] [1955] (DVD)
There can be few people who have never seen this superb war film recounting the design of the Bouncing bomb which was designed specifically for one purpose to burst the dams of the Rhur valley in Germany and thus cripple the industrial manufacturing base of the country.

Wing Commander Guy Gibson awarded the VC for his command of 617 squadron played really well by Richard Todd.

Recently on reading Guy Gibsons early 60s paperback autobiography about Bomber Command entitled "Enemy Coast Ahead" and now thankfully back in print after many years, the enactment of scenes in the film are very true to life having been given no embelishments to improve the story.

Every single scene in the film is relevant to the story even down to Gibson and fellow officer watching the West end production in London, coming up with the ingenious idea of using searchlight beams to accurately assertain the correct height of his aircraft whilst in flight

The tension,huge loss of life with eight Lancasters with the eight crew failing to return and the now famous Dambusters March.

Possibly the special effects now well over 50 years old may appear dated but nothing detracts from making the Dambusters one of the most convincing and accurate depictions of true wartime events.

You might be interested to know that behind the visitor centre just outside Rhayader in Mid Wales Elan Valley is the actual remains of Barnes Wallaces coffer dam used to test the neccessary explosive charge needed to breach the Rhur dams.

After seeing an article about it in my daily newspaper i desided to go and see it for myself.

Incredibly i have been to the Elan Valley many times to take part in the annual 20 mile road race without realising the remains of Wallaces dam were so close.

The walk along Caban Coch reservoirs shoreline is not suitable for the infirm or elderly which is a shame but the sense of anticipation of going to see such a significant and famous wartime relic so cleverly concealed was something i will never forget.

The dam must be atleast 20ft tall and 5ft thick and over 300ft wide but Mr wallace certainly made a mess of it.

There is so much original debris lying around that those who know it's there can easily grab a piece without any threat of depleting the supply.

When standing ontop which again is easily done the memories of this famous film come flooding back and you soon realise the importance and reasoning for sighting the dam in such a remote area of Mid Wales.

Even the original buildings are there in a kind of time warp.

The depiction of Barnes destroying the small dam at the begining of the film is quite strange after you realise how huge the original structure was.

Even today without any knowledge of it's existence which must be the case for the countless thousands who visit this picturesque area it is of no surprise that the Germans never located it's presence.

Derwent Water in the Peak District was the main test area for the Lancasters.The squadron was the only one officially allowed to fly under a hundred feet whilst in testing.Throughout the war nobody knew why the Lancasters flew so low,even other squadrons not connected to 617 were left in the dark.

Guy Gibson did own a black labrador that he called "Nigger" and yes he was unfortunately killed just outside the airbase, so the film remains as close to the real events of the war that we are likely to get.

It is only on purchasing the BluRay addition to this film that i was made aware of Gibsons lost companion "Nigger" appearing in the final credits of the film.

Just watch as Barnes Wallace full of remorse at having sent so many young men to die on this important mission for war moral talks to Gibson.

Just in the distant background above Gibsons right shoulder we see a ghost like black creature in slow motion, is this Nigger ?.

Nothing in the film has been added to improve the story unlike vertually every other war film to date.

The film keeps to the known facts and uses them to its brilliant advantage and on watching it again recently the acting and storyline still carry significant weight to make the film one of the true greats in British cinematic history.

The film may be approaching it's sixtieth birthday remarkably quickly but it's popularity will never cease.

Everything right down to the genuine archive film along Chesill beach on the south coast is factually accurate which goes to make it possibly the greatest war film to come out of a British studio.
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31 of 33 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Definitive Bombing Run film, 22 April 2007
By 
C. Pierides "Costa58artdeco" (South Africa) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Dam Busters [DVD] [1955] (DVD)
I watched this film several years ago, and this remains my firm best ever in its class. The footage of the magnificent Lancaster Bombers in flight, probably one of the last times these aircraft ever flew in numbers post the war. The magnitude of dropping bouncing bombs, outrageous in concept, magnificent and daring in its reality.The high casulty rate, incredible sacrifice of the brilliant pilots flying at 60 metres from the surface, the way of life of the scientists and pilot, and the clastrophobic red tape these people have to overcome, a battle against bureaucracy before the barrage of guns, gives one a true sense of what this must have been like.It is said that George Lucas used people involved with the dam busters to set up and assist with the attack on the death star sequence. Certainly, this would make a lot of sense. The tunnel sequences give the same sense of flying close up that I personally experienced flying hand gliders some years ago.Sure the dam busting itself has a sense of studio make in it, but this still remains a suberb film.
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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Classic, 22 Aug. 2000
By A Customer
Every Briton knows 'The Dam Busters', & few of us can hear the fabulous 'Dam Busters March' without feeling a swell of pride &/or becoming a tad teary-eyed.
It's certainly not the kind of film that would be made today - sensibilities have changed so much in 50 years - but it is a fine example of British WWII films, & an absolute classic. There is a strangely affecting combination of world-weariness & innocence in the bomber crews, young men who knew that they were likely to die any day now. No over-the-top special effects, no gung-ho speechifying - just a beautifully observed, sparely written script, strong on characterisation & plot development. Imagine that.
Regarding the argument over Gibson's naming of his dog: It is certainly not "PC", but I cannot agree that it should be changed. The term "nigger" certainly connoted more than mere colour to the people who experienced it as a term of abuse (as they definitely did throughout the Empire), but that was the dog's name, however much we may despise it now. To change the name in dubbing is to dodge an issue; to claim that the word did not have terrible connotations is naive; to complain because a viewer referenced the fact that they found the term offensive is to be blind to the power the word wields still - perhaps these folk are fortunate enough never to have witnessed any racial abuse in their lives. Nonetheless, the dog's name was what it was, & should not be changed because it makes us uncomfortable - we should simply be glad that it does.
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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Famous War Film, 6 Aug. 2002
By 
E. A. Redfearn "eredfearn2" (Middlesbrough) - See all my reviews
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The raid on the Ruhr Dams by 617 Squadron was one of the most famous during World War 2. Not entirely successful since only two dams were destroyed, it was nevertheless a morale booster. Sadly, eight of the aircraft failed to return to base, and this film is a tribute to their courage and memory. Richard Todd, a fine actor portrays Guy Gibson VC with great sensitivity. Many fine actors grace this film; if you look closely, you will spot John Fraser,Robert Shaw and Richard Thorpe before they became household names. Sir Michael Redgrave portrays the eccentric inventor Barnes Wallis with distinction. The special effects are dated of course, but it doesnt matter. The music score is famous too. Some of the aerial scenes by the way were filmed in Lincolnshire and Humberside, Goole Port standing in for a German village. Needs to be on DVD though for picture clarity. If you love British war films, you must buy this as a tribute to the brave crews of the RAF.
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The Dam Busters (Special Edition) [DVD] [1955]
The Dam Busters (Special Edition) [DVD] [1955] by Michael Anderson (DVD - 2010)
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