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47 of 47 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Flippin' Eyck, he's got a long snorkel !!! More on that story later....
This is a great 3 disc collection featuring some intriguing Hammer thrillers that were made in the 1950s and 1960s.

Here's a summary of each film:

Disc One
STOP ME BEFORE I KILL (1960)
Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1
Running Time: 108 minutes
Directed by Val Guest
Starring Ronald Lewis, Diane Cilento, Claude Dauphin, Bernard Braden,...
Published on 16 May 2010 by Jeremy W. Newbould

versus
0 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars hammer before the blood flowed
all the films are a bit slow and a bit dull , the plots are nothing new,but would be excellent viewing if shown by bbc2 on a wet sunday afternoon when you got nothing else to do.
Cash on demand - shows off Peter Cushing acting , but the suspence is hardly edge of the seat.
these are the dammed - again show us an excellent olly reede as disenchanted youth who...
Published 18 months ago by tim.62


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47 of 47 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Flippin' Eyck, he's got a long snorkel !!! More on that story later...., 16 May 2010
By 
This review is from: Icons of Suspense: Hammer Films [DVD] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC] (DVD)
This is a great 3 disc collection featuring some intriguing Hammer thrillers that were made in the 1950s and 1960s.

Here's a summary of each film:

Disc One
STOP ME BEFORE I KILL (1960)
Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1
Running Time: 108 minutes
Directed by Val Guest
Starring Ronald Lewis, Diane Cilento, Claude Dauphin, Bernard Braden, Francoise Rosay

Alan Colby, a famous racing driver, is badly injured in a road accident. Alan recovers but he has become prone to sudden bouts of anger and violence. After Alan tries to strangle his wife, he starts seeing a psychiatrist. As a result of the therapy he receives, Alan is seemingly cured of his trauma but then his wife mysteriously disappears....
RATING: 3 out of 5 stars

CASH ON DEMAND (1963)
Aspect Ratio: 1.66:1
Running Time: 80 minutes
Directed by Quentin Lawrence
Starring Peter Cushing, André Morell, Richard Vernon, Norman Bird, Edith Sharp

A fussy bank manager is hoodwinked by a suave criminal into assisting in the robbery of his own bank....
RATING: 4 out of 5 stars

Disc Two
THE SNORKEL (1958)
Aspect Ratio: 1.66:1
Running Time: 90 minutes
Directed by Guy Green
Starring Peter Van Eyck, Betta St. John, Mandy Miller, Gregoire Aslan, William Franklyn

Candy Brown is convinced that her stepfather, Paul Decker, is a murderer. She thinks that Paul killed her real father and that he has now killed her mother, who has been found gassed to death in their home, but nobody wants to believe her. The police think that Candy's mother commited suicide but Candy's suspicions about Paul grow stronger when she discovers some diving equipment in Paul's room....
RATING 4 out of 5 stars

MANIAC (1963)
Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1
Running Time: 86 minutes
Directed by Michael Carreras
Starring Kerwin Mathews, Nadia Gray, Donald Houston, Liliane Brousse, Norman Bird

An American artist, living in France, shacks up with a woman and her stepdaughter. The woman's husband (and the girl's father) has spent the last four years in an asylum for the brutal retribution killing of a man who assaulted his daughter but he won't be in there for much longer....
RATING: 5 out of 5 stars

Disc Three
NEVER TAKE CANDY FROM A STRANGER (1960)
Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1
Running Time: 81 minutes
Directed by Cyril Frankel
Starring Gwen Watford, Patrick Allen, Felix Aylmer, Niall MacGinnis, Alison Leggatt

A British man called Carter moves to a Canadian town with his wife and his 10 year-old daughter to take up a teaching job. Soon after they arrive, his daughter and her friend have a disturbing encounter with a local old pervert. Carter and his wife are determined to bring the man to justice but the problem is that the man is part of a well-known family that owns pretty much everything (and everyone) in the town. The eventual court case is predictably a travesty and the dirty old git gets off scot-free, giving him the opportunity to strike again....
RATING: 4 out of 5 stars

THESE ARE THE DAMNED (1963)
Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1
Runnung Time: 95 minutes
Directed by Joseph Losey
Starring Macdonald Carey, Shirley Ann Field, Oliver Reed, Viveca Lindfors, Alexander Knox

A secret military base houses some very unusual children that are being kept for a special purpose....
RATING: 4 out of 5 stars

This collection is an essential purchase for any fan and collector of Hammer movies and it proves that Hammer weren't just about making horror films. I know that it's a cliché but they don't make 'em like this anymore, and some might say that it's a good job, but I love these type of films. My favourite of this particular bunch is "Maniac" but all of these films are well worth a look.
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21 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Cash On Demand! (At Last!), 29 April 2010
By 
Mr. B. Fraser (London United Kindom) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Icons of Suspense: Hammer Films [DVD] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC] (DVD)
Five stars from me for this superb collection of Hammer suspenser's (1958-63).
This neat little set has six crisp black and white films from the legendary studio:
Cash On Demand-Stop Me Before I Kill!-The Snorkel-Maniac-Never Take Candy From A Stranger-These Are The Damned.
With minimal packaging and no booklet, it matters not, all the films are full length bright, clean and crisp transfers.
'Cash On Demand' is top of the list for me, a superb suspenser from (1961). A battle of wills enfolds when 'Colonel Gore-Hepburn' played by Andre Morell pays a visit to a small local bank posing as an insurance inspector. The bank manager 'Fordyce' is played by the ubiquitous Peter Cushing, both actors here excell in their performances as a two way band of intense and harrowing dialogue enfolds, for, Hepburn has come to empty the bank vaults... If Fordyce does not comply with Heburn's bidding then, his family will die.
A highly recommended set and I'd suggest acquiring them NOW-do not wait until the set is out of print!
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A MUST for any DVD collection!, 30 April 2010
By 
K. W. Wardle - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Icons of Suspense: Hammer Films [DVD] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC] (DVD)
I just watched Cash On Demand, a film I have waited a long time to see and I must say this set is highly recommended just on that film alone, please Sony, let's have more of your Hammer titles soon. The previous sets have all been superb!!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great compilation, 6 Jan 2013
By 
Autonome (London United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Icons of Suspense: Hammer Films [DVD] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC] (DVD)
This very precious DVD set gathers 6 "suspense" Hammer thrillers, five of them at least being very rare (the exception being "The Damned" - or "These are the damned" for the US market, easily available on its own). All these films were released between 1958 and 1963, and even if there is one turkey ("The Snorkel") and one failed experiment ("The Damned"), there are two very efficient thrillers ("Cash on demand" and "Maniac") and two near-masterpieces ("Never take candy from a stranger" and "Stop me before I kill!"). The four star reflects an average mark between all films. Going from the (in my view) least good one to the best one:

THE SNORKEL (1958) 2/5: This inept little thriller is overlong, overdone, overplayed and now completely outdated. Bar the impressive first scene, the reamaining 80mns are a collection of predictable set pieces, made worse by the unbearable, permanent whingeing of Mandy Miller. The only redeeming factor of this disaster is the dog Toto, who could have given acting lessons to its admittedly better-known but less talented human colleagues.

THE DAMNED (UK)/ THESE ARE THE DAMNED (US) (1961, released 1963) 3/5. I have reviewed this one separately here The Damned [DVD] [2010]: it is an interesting experiment by Joseph Losey which unfortunately does not quite work due to the lack of focus of the film. Please note that this edition offers the full 95mns version of this film, and not the butchered 77mns US version.

CASH ON DEMAND (1961) 4/5: This very efficient little B-movie (probably filmed in one location) is a showcase for two great Hammer actors: Peter Cushing and André Morell. Set against the backdrop of what was clearly a play, the two actors surpass themselves in parts that are clearly against type. We won't say anymore but this cheap movie functions like clockwork, despite an abbreviated and confusing finale.

MANIAC (1963) 4/5: This film, the third of Michael Carreras as Director, is one of his very best. Helped by another twisted Jimmy Sangster script, the beautiful Camargue location and stellar performances from Nadia Gray and Donald Houston, "Maniac" is superbly atmospheric. The first five minutes are brutally efficient, the build-up of a sexual tension between the Amerian tourist and the two "ladies of the house" is extremely well crafted and the finale is a succession of very well-written "coups de théâtre". Even if the film is plagued by some mild pacing problems at mid-point, "Maniac" stands, with "Steel Bayonnet", as the best film of its director.

THE FULL TREATMENT (UK)/ STOP ME BEFORE I KILL (US) (1961) 5/5: This is a very grown-up thriller from Hammer and star director Val Guest. It tells the story of a man who has strong psychological disturbances following a car accident. His young wife and a psychiatrist are trying to help him, but all is not what it seems. Val Guest manages a very efficient, classy thriller, very far away from the gritty Manchester from "Hell is a City"...since the bulk of the plot takes place in the French Riviera. But this is as efficient a film, and its themes (the treatment of a potentially compulsive murderer, responsibility towards death, couple disturbances that illness can induce) are manyfold but well-executed and never boring. Esthetically this is a beautiful film. The initial credit sequence in particular is extremely impressive and the cast is top-notch, headed by my compatriots Claude Dauphin and veteran actress Françoise Rosay. Ronald Lewis in the lead part is solid in this complex part, his first association with Hammer. "The Full Treatment" (or "Stop me before I kill!" in the US) would be the last film Val Guest would make for Hammer for almost ten years. Needless to say the company would sorely miss him.

NEVER TAKE SWEETS FROM A STRANGER (UK)/ NEVER TAKE CANDY FROM A STRANGER (US) (1960) 5/5: Who said Hammer didn't take any risk? This very disturbing drama, centered around a child molester protected by a small town community, addresses very delicate issues upfront. Totally revolutionary for its time, it benefits from a superb script that NEVER seeks to compromise (particularly at the end) and a fantastic cast (particularly Janina Fay as the young victim and a very courageous Felix Aylmer as a disgusting pedophile). Cyril Frankel directs the whole thing with pace and nerve. This film is a very unpleasant but very necessary cinematographic experience, which I heartily recommend to children and their parents.

Obviously, a great boxset, only (slightly) let down by "The Snorkel" but clearly a great investment for all movie fans!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Review for Cash on Demand, 27 Nov 2012
This review is from: Icons of Suspense: Hammer Films [DVD] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC] (DVD)
This is for Cash on Demand only.

I think it is criminal that such a film does not have a standalone dvd release.
Cash on Demand further highlights the supreme acting abilities of Peter Cushing. Here he plays a scrooge like bank manager who is duped into handing over the banks money two days before Christmas by a suave professional bank robber. For the most part the film is par excellence, great dialogue, direction and little things going on in every scene. The ending for me was a little far fetched and disappointing, but it didn't take too much from this very rare delighful film.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Mostly excellent., 20 April 2012
By 
Spike Owen "John Rouse Merriott Chard" (Birmingham, England.) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Icons of Suspense: Hammer Films [DVD] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC] (DVD)
Lovely crisp DVD transfer.

Cash on Demand (1961)

Cash on Delivery? Pah! This is Cash on Demand!

Out of Hammer Film Productions, Cash on Demand is directed by Quentin Lawrence and adapted the screenplay by David Chantler & Lewis Greifer from a play by Jacques Gillies. It stars Peter Cushing, Andre Morell, Richard Vernon, Norman Bird and Kevin Stoney. Music is by Wilfred Josephs and photography by Arthur Grant.

Hammer's Xmas movie has a kick and half.

In the opening section of Quentin Tarantino's Pulp Fiction, robber in waiting Tim Roth tells his lover, Amanda Plummer, about how a guy robbed a bank with just a telephone. This principal is the core of Hammer's majestic Cash on Demand, an intense, tightly constructed thriller that also provides proof positive of the acting talents of Peter Cushing, Andre Morell & Richard Vernon. With minimal budget to work from and operating out of practically one set, director Lawrence gets the maximum suspense out of script with no blood letting or overt violence. This is very much about eloquent verbal sparring, the terror is in what might happen should Cushing's (superb shifting of the acting gears as the plot unfolds) martinet bank manager not tow the slick line being drawn by Morell's (brilliantly playing his cards close to his chest) crafty thief.

A real gem and a pleasant surprise, both in technical merits and outcome of story. Highly recommended to all serious fans of Classic British Cinema. 9/10

Never Take Sweets from a Stranger (1960)

I don't know who's more dangerous, you or your father?

Never Take Sweets from a Stranger is directed by Cyril Frankel and written by John Hunter who adapts from the play Pony Cart written by Roger Garis. It stars Patrick Allen, Gwen Watford, Janina Faye, Felix Aylmer, Michael Gwynn, Alison Leggatt and Niall MacGinnis. Music is by Elisabeth Lutyns and John Hollingsworth and Megascope cinematography by Freddie Francis.

British family the Carter's have emigrated to small town Canada and are rocked when it is revealed that 9 year old Jean (Faye), and her friend Lucille (Frances Green), were asked to dance naked for candy at the home of elderly Clarence Olderberry Senior. Filing an official complaint, parents Peter (Allen) & Sally (Watford) are astounded to find the town's denizens are reluctant to believe the Carter's take on things. It becomes apparent that the Olderberry family were intstrumental in the building of the town and the family has much power within it. With the town closing ranks on the British outsiders, there's a real chance that a suspected paedophile will go unpunished and maybe strike again?

Thought provoking and intelligent handling of sensitive material, Hammer's Never Take Sweets from a Stranger has finally garnered the credit it deserves. Back on release the taboo subject of the plot ensured the film was mostly shunned, with bad marketing also proving to be a hindrance. However, it is ahead of its time in many ways, Frankel's (School for Scoundrels) picture manages to gnaw away at the senses with its calm and measured approach work. Francis' (The Innocents) black and white photography a clinical ally to the realism wrung out by Frankel.

The alienation of the Carter family is steadily built up, the small town mentality to strangers in their little world unspools calmly by way of credible acting and believable passages of dialogue. By the time the last third arrives, the frustration of the Carter's is shared by the viewers, things get legal and gripping, and then it's the uncoiling of the spring to unleash the denouement. Point made, a message movie of some standing, monsters in our midst indeed. Not merely the predators preying on our children, but also the guilty around them, ignorance most definitely isn't bliss. 8.5/10

The Snorkel (1958)

The Snorkel Killer, a most illusive being.

Out of Hammer Films, The Snorkel is directed by Guy Green and co-written by Anthony Dawson, Peter Myers & Jimmy Sangster. It stars Peter van Eyck, Betta St. John, Mandy Miller, Gregoire Aslan & William Franklyn (Wilson). Music is by Francis Chagrin and cinematography by Jack Asher.

There is no plot synopsis needed for The Snorkel because it takes us straight into the story by having us witness the perfect murder of a wife and mother, and we know who perpetrated it as well, it's the husband! There's a gimmick, the snorkel of the title, and film's success mostly hinges on a devilish twist for the finale. In between the plot revolves around the daughter of the deceased, Candy (Miller), trying to prove her stepfather has killed her mom even though it appears near impossible for him to have done so. Naturally sadistic dad has plans for Candy as well.

Coming as it did during Hammer's run of colour laden reinventions of the Universal monsters, The Snorkel, in black and white, received very little attention at home and abroad. Hammer would release in the 60s, post the success of Psycho, a number of very good black and white psychological thrillers such as Taste of Fear, Paranoiac, Nightmare and Maniac, this period of Hammer film would certainly have seen The Snorkel getting more attention publicly. However, although bad timing can account for some of the reason it was an unsuccessful release, the truth of the matter is that it's just not particularly memorable outside of the gimmick and denouement, and even then with the finale it loses dramatic impact by going on 5 minutes too long for what one imagines was a censor avoiding appeasement. A shame because acting is mostly good, Jack Asher's camera work holds the eyes and production value is higher than expected (location for the shoot was San Remo in Italy).

Undeniably it's got an interesting premise at heart, but it is kind of silly when examined still further. Making this a cautiously recommended Hammer thriller for those who have yet to see the far better films of its type that the company produced in the 60s. 5/10

Maniac (1963)

You take a man's wife, Mr. Farrell, but not his money?, 12 April 2013
Maniac is directed by Michael Carreras and written by Jimmy Sangster. It stars Kerwin Matthews, Nadia Gray, Lillian Brouse, Donald Houston and George Pastell. Music is by Stanley Black and cinematography by Wilkie Cooper.

Vacationing in the Carmarque region of France, American artist Jeff Farrell (Matthews) gets more than he bargain for when he becomes romantic interest for mother and daughter Eve (Gray) and Annette (Brousse) Beymat...

Out of Hammer Film Productions, Maniac is one of a number of psychopath themed thrillers that followed in the footsteps of Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho. Filmed in black and white on location in Caramarque, the film opens with a tremendous whack as young Annette Beynat is abducted on her way home from school and raped (off camera) by the side of the road. This crime is witnessed by a local man who fetches Annette's father who promptly captures the rapist and gets medieval on his ass with a acetylene torch (again off camera). It's quite an opening, but then the film settles into a leisurely pace for the next hour as Carreras and Sangster build their story in preparation for a big finale. Then things get tricky, and I'm not just talking about for handsome Jeff Farrell...

Realising they have gone for a "major" slow build and are desperate to add some added bite into what was becoming a bona fide sub-genre of thrillers, the makers cram so much into such a short space of time it collapses under its own weight. We know there's going to be a twist, the whole story is geared towards this fact, but they instead keep twisting, and twisting until it no longer becomes interesting. While the actual finale is something of a damp squib. There's a big problem with the location as well, Carreras' flat direction is unable to draw anything substantially atmospheric from the locale. True, a chase and reveal at the climax gets a splendid back drop in which to unfold, but it's a rare moment of inspiration and you are kind of taken out of because of piecing together the threads and implausibilities.

It's a very frustrating film, one where the usually great Sangster over reaches himself and Carreras doesn't come up to the standard of Terence Fisher or Freddie Francis. It holds the interest, is decently performed, has good production value and is fleetingly attention grabbing, but this should have been much much better. Both visually and with plot machinations. 6/10

The Damned (1963)

I live with one fact. A power has been released that will melt these stones. We must be ready when the time comes.

The Damned (AKA: These Are The Damned) is directed by Joseph Losey and adapted to screenplay by Evan Jones from the novel The Children of Light written by H.L. Lawrence. It stars Macdonald Carey, Shirley Anne Field, Oliver Reed, Alexander Knox, Viveca Lindfors and Walter Gotell. Music is by James Bernard and cinematography by Arthur Grant.

The South Coast of England, and a middle aged American tourist, a Teddy Boy gang leader and his troubled sister are thrust together into a deadly scenario deep below the cliffs of Weymouth...

Blacklisted by Hollywood, Joseph Losey moved to Britain to continue his artistic leanings. 1963 saw the release of two Losey movies, the much lauded The Servant and also The Damned, the latter of which was finished in 1961 but held back for reasons that are not exactly clear. As it transpires, The Damned is something of an under seen gem, a unique picture that defies genre classification, one of Hammer Films' oddest productions but all the more brilliant for it.

From the off it should be stated that this is not a film for those wishing to be cheered up, from a brutal mugging at the start to a finale that will haunt your dreams, pessimism and bleakness pervades the narrative. This is in the vein of The Quatermass series of films, tinged with a touch of John Wyndham's Midwich Cuckoos, yet for the fist part of the film there's no clue as to where the narrative will take you.

The back drop is a sunny and vibrant seaside town (Weymouth one of my favourite British resorts), an irritatingly catchy tune (Black Leather Rock) is being sung as we follow the meeting of the principal characters. From here you think this is a film about teenage angst, a Black Rebel Motorcycle Club themed picture, where the perils of gang youth is born and the divide between the young and the old is caustically dissected. Yet this is not the case at all, this is merely a cataclysmic meeting of integrity and troubled souls that's going somewhere terribly sad, the vagaries of fate dealing its deadly hand.

Losey then instills the picture with potent characterisations and striking imagery as we head towards what will be a fascinating and clinically cruel last third of the film. The brother and sister relationship between King and Joan is drip fed with smart dialogue, we don't need it spelled out, but we know that from King's side of things it's badly unhealthy. In the middle is Simon, trying to build a relationship with Joan under trying circumstances. At first it's hard to accept a "clearly too old" Simon as a romantic partner for a sultry Joan, but as back stories are dangled it's not inconceivable that Joan would seek solace in the arms of an older man.

The Children of Light.

On the outer edges, for a while, are Bernard (Knox) and Freya (Lindfors), he's a scientist, she's a sculptress, they themselves are part of a weird relationship. He's mysterious and soon to become the focal point of a terrible secret, she's eccentric and spends her time at her cliff top studio crafting weird sculptures, the latter of which Losey gleefully enjoys framing to keep the atmosphere edgy, the images are lasting and used to great impact as The Damned reveals its hand, and what a hand it is. Enter the science fiction, enter the government and their shifty dalliances, enter the children, the children of light...

It's a socko final third of cinema, both narratively and in viewing Losey's skill at creating striking compositions (while he garners impressive performances from his cast as well, especially Lindfors). It becomes thrilling yet deeply profound as it spins towards its bleak finale. It can be argued that its core sentiment (message) is heavily handled, and that Carey is a touch unsuitable as an all action hero type, but the film rises above these minor issues. For once the camera pulls away from the cliffs to reveal a swanky seaside town, the cries of children still ringing in our ears, you know you have watched something pretty special. 9/10

One of Hammer's unsung classics, The Damned can be found on The Icons of Suspense Hammer Collection. Region 1, it appears with five other films, two of which - Cash On Demand/Never Take Sweets from A Stranger - are also little gems waiting to be discovered. Great transfers for viewing pleasure, I can't recommend this collection highly enough.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Hit Rate High on Top Value Set, 7 Mar 2011
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This review is from: Icons of Suspense: Hammer Films [DVD] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC] (DVD)
Negatives out the way first - the DVD case is rubbish, 3 discs on one spindle is a no-no,(however, for me, still preferable to flipper discs). There's also no extras (aside from the trailers, which are good to have) and one film I found incredibly annoying (Stop Me Before I Kill, which takes an interminable 108 mins to reach the most predictable of conclusions). However I've given this 5 stars and for good reason. Cash on Demand is a fabulous showcase for Peter Cushing and Andre Morrel, it's a pitch perfect twisted Christmas tale and worth the price on its own. The same could be said of These are the Damned, a wonderfully atmospheric and ambitious dystopian sci fi/teddy boy delinquent mash up, if you can imagine such a thing. Next for me is The Snorkel which plays a bit like Night of the Hunter with a glowering villain menacing an innocent kid that nobody believes. Really good performances all round here and the titular gimmick is a good one. Never Take Candy From a Stranger is more melodrama than suspenser but still a solid watch and the ending pulls no punches - this film will still shock many sensibilites. The remaining feature Maniac is pretty good, if a little too heavily indebted to Les Diaboliques, right down to the French country setting and attendant satanic females.
No problems with disc playability and picture quality for all 6 movies is excellent. Highly recommended purchase.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Rare Hammer Gems, 25 May 2010
By 
T. Turner (Birmingham, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Icons of Suspense: Hammer Films [DVD] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC] (DVD)
I've just finished watching Cash On Demand, Never Take Sweets From A Stranger and The Snorkel from this set.

These are great black and white rarities from Hammer and much overlooked. Full of atmosphere, suspense, great performances and wonderful cinematography, the films all have a nice sting in the tail. Cash On Demand features the best performances from Cushing and Morell that you'll ever seen.

Well worth the money for six films - you will not be disappointed!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Good Value Boxed Set, 4 July 2014
This review is from: Icons of Suspense: Hammer Films [DVD] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC] (DVD)
A great collection at a great price. I really bought this boxed set for just one film because it was better value than buying an individual copy of the film. The film in question is "The Snorkel". This is a film I saw when I was VERY young and it made a lasting impression on me. Watching it again after so many years, I was not disappointed. The other 5 films were a bonus. They are all rather dated now but are nonetheless enjoyable to a lesser or greater degree. Of the others, I enjoyed the Peter Cushing film "Cash On Demand" best.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Hammer Icons of Suspense dvd, 12 April 2014
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This review is from: Icons of Suspense: Hammer Films [DVD] [Region 1] [US Import] [NTSC] (DVD)
From the age of 16, I was a Hammer film fan, and still am. I'm now in my 60s. I had never seen any of the films in this collection until now, and I must say the picture and sound quality on these old films is remarkable. It's a pity British distributors don't pick up these films as not everyone has a multi region player. Have recommended it to my son.
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