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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Colour of Magic and the Light Fantastic
I came across this omnibus version of the two first Discworld novels while searching for The Colour of Magic at my local bookstore. I am very glad I got this particular version, because you really need to read both novels to conclude the story about Rincewind and Twoflower. It took me a while to get into the story, but once I did I really enjoyed it. It is very funny, but...
Published on 17 May 2008 by O Gardener

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars An Introduction to an Extraordinary world
I am a newcomer to Pratchett so thought I would start at the beginning. I found Pratchett's style of writing both beautiful and engaging and really felt the book gave you a brilliant insight into the marvellously created Discworld. However at times I felt this was at detriment to the plot which seemed to plunder from one incident to the next as an excuse to delve further...
Published on 7 Mar 2011 by Leona


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good, but not the best, 15 Jun 2010
Having just decided to purchase the entire discworld collection after reading a selection, I was looking forward to reading the start of it all. It's funny, thought-provoking and a really good read, but I personaly don't think it's the best of the discworld books. But still good!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Don't give up, 8 Mar 2010
By 
Oracle - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
One of the best pieces of book advice I was ever given was from a friend who told me that if I wanted to read Discworld I should do so from the beginning and in chronological order, but that I shouldn't stop if I was less than impressed with the first couple of books. Luckily I followed her advice.

The Colour of Magic is far from a great novel. Flashes of Pratchett genius show through here and there but for the most part it's not nearly so funny or clever as his later books and lacks their sharp satirical bite. It's also a little dated and clearly harks from an era when Conan was big at the cinema. Read it if you want to cover the entire Pratchett canon, but don't let it put you off.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Start of the Best Fantasy Series Ever, 15 Mar 2008
By 
J. Chippindale (England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
Terry Pratchett has become one of the most popular authors alive today and his popularity is richly deserved. But not even with his fertile mind could ever have envisaged the heights to which his Discworld series would rise. The Colour of Magic was first published in 1982 and is the start of the Discworld novels. To a degree it is amazing that these books have achieved such popularity but they certainly have and they are probably the most read fantasy books in the world.

You would think that a fantasy world full of trolls, zombies, witches, vampires would be an alien concept to most readers. Werewolves and dwarves in the Ankh Morpork city watch. Wizards running a university. All this to come in future episodes. Surely this style of writing would have a limited readership? but no the books are loved by anybody and everybody and are read by people who would not normally allow fantasy fiction on to their book shelves. This is the Discworld of terry Pratchett.

This first book in the series is about a wizard who is plagued by spells that don't always work and if they do, they do not always achieve the ends he had in mind. His meeting with Twoflower a 'tourist' makes for hilarious reading.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars What a Beginning to the Series, 8 Dec 2007
By 
J. Chippindale (England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
Terry Pratchett has become one of the most popular authors alive today and his popularity is richly deserved. But not even with his fertile mind could ever have envisaged the heights to which his Discworld series would rise. This book first published in 1982 is the start of the Discworld novels and to a degree it is amazing that these books have achieved such popularity.

You would think that a fantasy world full of trolls, zombies, witches, vampires would be an alien concept to most readers. Werewolves and dwarves in the Ankh Morpork city watch. Wizards running a university. All this to come in future episodes. Surely this style of writing would have a limited readership? but no the books are loved by anybody and everybody and are read by people who would not normally allow fantasy fiction on to their book shelves. This is the Discworld of terry Pratchett.

This first book in the series is about a wizard whois plagued by spells that don't always work and if they do, they do not always achieve the ends he had in mind. His meeting with Twoflower a 'tourist' makes for hilarious reading.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Spellbinding !,, 15 April 2006
"The Color of Magic" is the first book in Terry Pratchett's hugely popular Discworld Series. He has gone on to win the Carnegie Medal for "The Amazing Maurice and his Educated Rodents" and was awarded the OBE in 1998.

The Discworld is, of course, flat and rests on the shoulders of four giant elephants. These are, in turn, carried through the cosmos by an even bigger turtle called Great A'Tuin. (The astrozoologists of the land of Krull, in their desire to better understand the universe, shortly hope to determine whether A'Tuin is male or female). The Discworld's Gods and Goddesses live in Dunmanifestin, on top of Cori Celesti. Their favourite pastimes include playing games with the lives of mortals, with Fate and the Lady featuring highly amongst the leading players.

One of the Lady's favourite 'pieces' is Rincewind - a native of the Discworld's oldest city, Ankh-Morpork, and a coward of some renown. He is also an ex-student of the Unseen University, a thoroughly hopeless wizard and the 'hero' of this book. The only spell he knows comes from the Octavo, and is so powerful that no other spell is brave enough to stay in his head. (The Octavo was the Creator's spellbook, and was carelessly left behind after the universe's completion). As the book opens, Rincewind's home city is in flames and he is fleeing in the company of Twoflower - the Discworld's first tourist. Twoflower, who has just introduced the concept of fire insurance to Ankh-Morpork, comes from the Counterweight Continent and has hired Rincewind as his guide. He also has a very loyal and frequently angry Luggage, which is made from sapient pearwood. Twoflower desperately wants to see the very things that Rincewind desperately wants to avoid - heroes (Hrun the barbarian, for example), dragons, fights and such like. As a result, Death has been snapping at Rincewind's heels since he first met Twoflower - that is, of course, the tall and under-fed gentleman who wears a hood, carries a scythe and TALKS LIKE THIS. To avoid meeting his fate, Rincewind is willing to travel to the very ends of the world...

As the first book in the Discworld series, this is probably the most obvious place to start. (It's certainly best to read it before "The Light Fantastic", the series' second instalment - while the pair form a prelude to "Interesting Times", the seventeenth Discworld book). Pratchett's books are always very funny, and Rincewind and the Luggage are two of my favourite characters. Definitely recommended !
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars lol what a good, 10 Nov 2006
By 
My friend said I should try the Terry Pratchett Discworld books so I decided to start from book one "The Colour of Magic" and work my way through the books one by one.

I could not put this book down because it was so entertaining and so funny. I haven't read anything like this book and the style of book was new to me but i was so glad that I picked up this book and started to read it because it is so entertaining and funny and full of great lines that just had me laughing none stop.

If you have never read a book by Terry Practhett you really need to pick this book up and read it and you will love it, I promise!!
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Crash bang whallop, what a book!, 21 July 2004
great a'tuin, the world turtle(sex unknown), swimming through the cosmos carrying 4 elephants and the maddest world in this (or any other) universe.
the colour of magic is the first introduction to the Discworld; a place where magic is tamed by powerful (and inept) wizards, a place where the horizon really is the edge of the world, and home to the most incompetent cunjurer the multiverse has ever known; Rincewind.
in this book, Rincewind will embark on a journey to the edge of the world with the Disc's first ever tourist; Twoflower.
throw in a few dragons, heros, barbarians and giant copper constructions and you have a recipe for a great story.
having read the entire discworld series to date i can honestly say that, good as the colour of magic may be, the experience just gets better and better.
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17 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars If you like this then read the sequel, The Light Fantastic., 16 Mar 2002
Reading the first page or two of The Colour of Magic, all about Great A'Tuin and the four pachyderms that stand on his back, your mind starts to wonder and then you may be tempted to put the book down and read something else. For God's sake don't. Get on to the actual story and you won't want to put it down. All about a failed wizard (Rincewind) with one of the eight Great Spells in his head and the Disc's first tourist Twoflower, there's a laugh on almost every page. There aren't any chapters, (which is just as well because what use are they anyway except as badly-done, cheap cliffhangers?), so the story moves very fast but you will find intercepts telling you about the make-up of the discworld every so often. They give you a chance to stop and make sure you're on top of everything that's happening, without losing the story.
All in all a brilliant, fast moving story by, in my books, the world's best author Terry Pratchett.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The original, and best, Discworld novel, 21 Sep 2005
By 
Mr. R. M. O'flanagan (Leeds) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I disagree with those people who say that this book compares unfavourably with later discworld novels, and that it should be read only as a proper introduction to the series. What this book (and the other early discworld novels, The Light Fantastic, Mort, and Equal Rites) lacks by way of well worn in-jokes and a polished sheen it more than makes up for in inventiveness and imagination. It says a lot that the excellent characters introduced here (and in the other early discworld novels) have cropped up repeatedly in later books, where they've sadly been over used, to the extent that the series can seem like the Fast Show - the same jokes every week but in a slightly different context.
The best thing about the Colour of Magic is that it was just so different to everything else around when it was released, and even reading it again for the umpteenth time you still find yourself being constantly amazed by the rush of ideas. That its also quite amusing in places is an added bonus. Sadly, since Wyrd Sisters, the discworld books all read as either parodies of well known tales, or attempted satires on the modern world - in other words, "comedies" that are set in a fantasy world, except not really that funny.
The Colour of Magic (and The Light Fantastic) on the other hand are excellent fantasy novels that don't take themselves too seriously, and are all the better for it. If you've tried a more recent Discworld novel and wondered what all the fuss was about, read this and perhaps you'll see that at least some of the hype has been justified.
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20 of 24 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Don't start with this one if you're new to the series, 16 July 2008
By 
This is certainly not one to start the series with if you are new to Terry Pratchett - it is thematically quite different (which is understandable considering that it's the first of his Discworld books) and rather rough in parts. It's certainly one to read once you're familiar with the world, but you'd be better off starting with something like Mort or Soul Music to get a better flavour of what Discworld is all about.
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