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19 of 19 people found the following review helpful
on 7 February 2004
I loved this book! Gripping from start to finish, I couldn't wait to continue the trip around the monopoly board each night for the last few weeks.
The story told via the author's journey around the Monopoly Board streets often made me laugh (the sort of giggling that when on a train, everyone looks over at you wondering what the heck you're reading); often enraged me about how London has pretty much changed for the worse since the 1930s, and made me really wonder about our history as a whole.
Despite having walked down many of the streets, I would have never guessed the history or stories of each, and I now feel compelled to go and visit them all now that I do know. There is so much more than meets the eye to the popular game we all played as kids. It never occurred to me to think why the colours were linked together, why some unfamiliar streets and stations were chosen instead of their more obvious counterparts and what has happened to those places since Monopoly was created.
I would recommend this book to anyone. It was the best book I've read in ages.
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20 of 20 people found the following review helpful
on 21 December 2003
Not a big Monopoly fan, but certainly a big fan of this book. Tim Moore does his research before going to a place, so he knows the kinds of things to look out for as well as the questions to ask: which makes this book really very enjoyable. I've learnt a lot of trivia from this book too - did you know that, for example, more people shop at Selfridge's every year than live in Australia? His writing is amusing and clever; his observations all the more valid for the research he does; and he comes across as a very human writer. If you live in London, or visit regularly, you'll get a lot out of this book - probably why I read most of it on holiday in the USA.
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69 of 72 people found the following review helpful
on 25 October 2003
I just love this book and totally agree with a prior review which stated that you should not read this book in public.
In fact, I have been "ordered" not to read it within my own lounge room, as I distract the rest of the family from whatever it is, they are doing. They cannot concentrate with the titters,giggles and raving rounds of laughter, the deeper I get into the book.
Having just returned from this fantastic City of London, where I too played live "MONOPOLY" ,I have found though, that a most necessary accessory for reading Tim's master piece, if you are not a Londoner oneself, is a decent map of the city. I find I need to check out exactly where he is, in certain chapters so that I can get a true picture in my mind of where he is enjoying those truly special experiences. By finding my bearings on the map, I am able to relive my wonderful vacation to this remarkable city, which unfortunatly is so so far away from me now.
His facts and figures about specific issues amaze me and not only do I find myself laughing throughout the book but I also feel a strong urge to share these unknown facts to my whole family or in fact whoever is around at the time. It seems to me whilst reading, that Tim has written these strangely amazing bits and pieces of history, culture and trivea as if to to enlighten everyone and so I feel as if it is my duty as the reader,to be the delivery medium for the information. If I'm enjoying it then, so should others. His tongue in cheek humour just breaks me up and I feel as if I am lost within the huge expanse of those city streets myself as I delve into his interpretation of London via the Monoply Board.
Very very funny, very well written and truly entertaining. Thank you Tim for the memories.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
on 10 February 2004
Did you know that Leicester Square was once home to a woman who claimed to have given birth to fifteen rabbits? That Liberty's department store is made out of a battleship that helped sink Napoleon? And that you don't have to pay parking fines on electric cars in Westminster?
If you're the kind of person who found Schott's Miscellany interesting, but too full of things you either already knew or could find with very little difficulty on the net, you'd love this book - which is not only full of brilliant research but also really very funny indeed. It's a great read as a narrative, but dip into any page at random and you'll find the most extraordinary things about London, Monopoly,and just life's rich tapestry in general.
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30 of 31 people found the following review helpful
on 4 November 2003
I really enjoyed reading this. The chapter exploring the water works by investigating the history of sewage treatment in London was one of my favourites. I learnt a lot of previously unknown knowledge about London and it helped me realise why the locations on the board are grouped as they are.
I'll never look at a monopoly board in the same way again.
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38 of 40 people found the following review helpful
on 6 October 2003
I have read all of Moore's books to date and this is definitely one of the best. I hacked through most of DO NOT PASS GO on two 3 hour flights. Be warned. Do not read alone in public spaces unless you are immune to the embarrasment of being considered deranged for laughing out loud.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
I’ve never got on with Monopoly at all; maybe I’m an incipient socialist, or just hopeless at board games. Anyway, “Do Not Pass Go” has inspired me to have another stab at it. It is one of those books that provokes barks of laughter, snorts of incredulity and little grunts of “ooh, well I didn’t know that!”. Even the most seasoned Londoner will discover fascinating facts and feel compelled to go and have a good nose around previously undiscovered areas of the metropolis.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on 3 December 2002
While I happily admit to owning all of Tim Moore's other books and enjoying them all immensely, I think this is possibly his best work. Extremely funny and in this case exceptionally british - it may not have quite the global appeal of his previous books to everyone, but to anyone who is fascinated by London and it's history it's appeal should be all the greater. Some people may not get by with Moore's style, but I'd rather have something written clevery in a very amusing manner than a dry monologue that just regurgitates facts - if you want that, just buy a tourist map. The very fact that I remember many of the bits of trivia that come up in the book is testament to how enjoyable and memorable the writing is. Top stuff!
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on 11 February 2003
... this isn't an epic work of travel writing, but it was jolly good fun and wasn't trying to be anything else. The concept of travelling around London using a Monopoly board to direct your footsteps WAS slightly cheesy, but I found out some things about the city that were completely new to me, some of them even fascinating. If you're looking for deep, insightful, considered, endlessly researched, over-opinionated and above all dry and lifeless account of how London has changed (mostly for the worse) in the last 70 years then look elsewhere. But, if you you like discovering fascinating historical facts in context with a commentary of so-called progress, plus a few chuckles, then get this book. You won't be disappointed!
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on 30 January 2004
I just got this book for Christmas and it was probably the best thing I got!
I know that's quite sad. However Tim Moore creates a cosy enviroment in which he takes you around the Monopoly board and gives fascinating insights into the background of the streets and areas that you visit. He obviously loves London and via the Monopoly board you get to see some of the high and low lights in a very eclectic selection. Well worth a read.
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