Customer Reviews


33 Reviews
5 star:
 (26)
4 star:
 (5)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:
 (1)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


31 of 31 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The best of the Psmith series
"Leave it to Psmith" concludes the evolution of the Psmith character, from Wodehouse's earliest style of writing with the "Schools" genre, to a comic character whose dialogue keeps the reader entertained throughout. This story sees Psmith enter into Blandings Castle, and though Lord Emsworth is not the dominant character he later becomes, flashes of brilliance are visible...
Published on 8 Jan 2004 by Paul Donovan

versus
31 of 31 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic book ill served by the Kindle edition
I already tried to leave a review, which has not been published - so this is my second attempt. This is a fine book that has been horribly produced for the Kindle edition. I marked up around 60 errors of transcription and formatting. Clearly this has been scanned in but not proof read. I wouldn't mind if the edition was incredibly cheap, but for 5.33 it is shockingly...
Published on 9 Feb 2011 by Mr. N. C. Angel


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 4 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

31 of 31 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The best of the Psmith series, 8 Jan 2004
By 
Paul Donovan (London, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
"Leave it to Psmith" concludes the evolution of the Psmith character, from Wodehouse's earliest style of writing with the "Schools" genre, to a comic character whose dialogue keeps the reader entertained throughout. This story sees Psmith enter into Blandings Castle, and though Lord Emsworth is not the dominant character he later becomes, flashes of brilliance are visible in his appearances (and in those of Lady Constance, who plays an important role in this book).
"Leave it to Psmith" is packed full of witty dialogue, readily suited to Psmith's character, and the traditional Wodehouse farce for the plot (misunderstandings, a stolen necklace, and so forth). The ending is predictable, of course, but this is hardly the point. It is the use of language that makes this such an enjoyable tale. Wodehouse connoisseurs all have their own favourite phrases, or particular sections of books that strike them as humorous from the prolific collection of Wodehouse's works. Suffice to say, several of my personal favourite sections appear in this book - Psmith at the employment agency, or describing his career as a fishmonger spring to mind. Those who enjoy the Blandings or Jeeves and Wooster series would do well to read this book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


31 of 31 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic book ill served by the Kindle edition, 9 Feb 2011
By 
Mr. N. C. Angel "Ankle Man" (London) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Leave it to Psmith (Kindle Edition)
I already tried to leave a review, which has not been published - so this is my second attempt. This is a fine book that has been horribly produced for the Kindle edition. I marked up around 60 errors of transcription and formatting. Clearly this has been scanned in but not proof read. I wouldn't mind if the edition was incredibly cheap, but for 5.33 it is shockingly sloppy. Please do not buy this in its e-book form.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


17 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Masterpiece?, 17 Feb 2006
By 
Peter Young (Cambridge, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Leave It To Psmith (Hardcover)
Introduce the wonderful Psmith into the world of Blandings Castle and the combination is comic dynamite. Whilst the Jeeves and Wooster collection is probably the finest series from the pen of P.G. Wodehouse, this simply marvellous book is arguably his finest hour. You'll never think about flowerpots in the same way again.
Read, delight and enjoy!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very very funny, 30 Jun 2009
By 
Eddie Lacooz (London, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Leave It To Psmith (Hardcover)
If you had to measure a book by the number of times you laugh so hard you have to put the book down, this might well come top.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This second in the series is even better than the first, 23 April 2010
By 
Aquinas "summa" (celestial heights, UK) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Leave it to Psmith (Paperback)
Having read many of the jeeves stories 20 years ago and watched again recently the ITV Jeeves and Wooster starring Stephen Fry and Hugh Laurie, I thought it was time to get back to Wodehouse for some good cheer. But, I wanted to start on something different, so I decided to start with the Blandings novels - this is the second in the series. As someone who struggles to get a night sleep because of pain, it was a sheer delight for me to have the tonic of reading this book peopled with its eccentric characthers and its convoluted plot where nobody is who they claim to be.

The young upper class PSmith is the most striking characther here and has some of the best lines in the book and of course, we have Lord Emsworth appearing again - this time seeming even madder - starting lunch with a poet and continuing lunch with a different person (Psmith) who he thinks is the same person resulting in confusion and impersonation down in Blandings. But the plot about the stealing of a necklace is a real howl with everyone pretending to be someonelse and Baxter Lord Emsworth's sercretary really losing it in trying to track down the thief. I read this in 2 days and enjoyed every page. Thanks Mr Wodehouse - hope you are enjoying eternity!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Leave it to Wodehouse, 3 Jun 2009
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Leave it to Psmith (Paperback)
I've been reading PG Wodehouse books for years, I wish I'd come across this one sooner. An absolute gem, especially for those who favour Blandings stories. It is however, pre-pig obsessed Emsworth... If you are of a porcine bent, you may be slightly dissapointed. Don't let that put you off though, plenty of imposters and flying flowerpots will make up for the lack of the Empress.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars A Wonderful Slice of Wodehouse in his Prime, 4 Aug 2014
By 
Amazon Customer (Leamington Spa, Warwickshire United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Leave it to Psmith (Paperback)
Published in 1923, Leave it to Psmith is the final novel featuring Psmith, a young and charismatic dandy in search of an income and a wife. Despite being a less familiar character, Psmith (the ‘P’ is silent, comrade) is surrounded by reassuring Wodehouse staples like the Drones Club and Blandings Castle. This is unquestionably comfortable territory for the Wodehouse admirer. The plot, therefore, which involves jewel thieves, improbable coincidences, flowerpots and marital bliss, is almost incidental to the joy of Wodehousian prose cavorting in the Spring of his career.

There is a certain pleasure in reading a Wodehouse novel published when the real world still, somewhat, mirrored his fictional world of clubs, country houses and county balls. Some of the later novels err toward pastiche but here there is a real vibrancy that shines through his playful satire. Admittedly, the limitations of the Psmith character do begin to assert themselves – Wodehouse was right to retire him when he did. Psmith is simply too competent to sustain comic greatness. He’s almost an amalgam of Jeeves and Wooster but without the soaring heights of genius achieved by the former nor stygian depths of stupidity plumbed by the latter.

Despite this, for the duration of this novel, he is a joy, posing as a Canadian writer whilst acting under the instruction of the magnificently inept Hon. Freddie Threepwood. What is more, there is a wealth of wonderful supporting characters. Some, like Lord Elmsworth, would continue the long march to greatness whilst Aileen Peavey is allowed to spout her mawkish poetry in this novel alone.

Leave it to Psmith is not, perhaps, as consistently brilliant as the best Jeeves or Blandings but with a handful of perfect comic vignettes (the employment agency, in particular) and that perfect Wodehouse prose, it’s not far off.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars When worlds collide, 21 Oct 2007
This review is from: Leave It To Psmith (Hardcover)
`Leave it to Psmith' is the advertising motto of Psmith's new enterprise, he is open to all offers from running a business to walking a dog all on the behalf of his customers. His only customer is Freddie Threepwood whom is keen for Psmith to come to Blandings Castle to steal his Aunts Necklace so that Uncle Joe can sell it to make enough money for Freddie's latest scheme and for Uncle Joe's daughter to bankroll her husband, one Mike Jackson, to set up a farm. And so the Worlds of Mike, Psmith and Lord Emsworth collide in the second Blandings novel and the first to include the now world famous Drones Club favoured by the young Bertie Wooster amongst other Wodehouse regulars.

As ever no one travels to Blandings under their own name and Psmith is received as the renowned poet McTodd and in deference to his behaviour in his previous appearances in Wodehouse's work he has fallen in love with Miss Halliday who has been appointed to catalogue the library at Blandings. Also in the party is Smooth Lizzie experienced jewel thief who is also after Lady Constance's necklace with the help of Edward Cootes who is pretending to be a valet. Smooth Lizzie met Lady Constance under the name Miss Peavey, another poet of some renown, aboard the liner Atlantic.

Rupert Baxter, Lord Emsworth's secretary has established that something is not quite right with the literary guests and his attempts to establish what is going on only add to the confusion of the residents and staff at Blandings notably the dignified butler Beach. Even with the precaution of appointing a private detective as a housemaid Baxter can never equal the `vim' or `zip' of Psmith. Baxter could never imagine the conclusion Wodehouse will bring to the proceedings and although the reader will have worked most of them out whilst half way through chapter one this in no way diminishes this as one of the best entertainments ever written.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars P G Tops, 7 Sep 2013
By 
Stuart Wilson - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Leave it to Psmith (Paperback)
Yes, one of the best PGWs, right up there with Code of the Woosters, Joy in the Morning & Summer Moonshine. The last Psmith story, I believe, which is a shame, since he makes a nice dynamic counterpoint to the wriggling helplessness of Bertie W - whereas the latter is invariably the hapless plaything of an often Aunt-driven destiny, with the traditional last minute rescue from His Man, Psmith actually orchestrates his own turmoil and then magisterially concocts a solution, with several wonderfully comic monologues along the way.Several scenes rather similar to Something Fresh, it might be noted, once everyone gets to Blandings, but Wodehouse was never one to fear repeating himself. A book to treasure, in other words.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Diamond Tale, 7 May 2012
By 
Jo D'Arcy (Portsmouth, UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Leave it to Psmith (Paperback)
Lord Emsworth of Blanding's Castle has but one love it seems, his garden and the various conflicts he has with his gardener Angus McAllister. However his sister Lady Constance has another love; one which seems to be of the fashion - hosting literary types at the castle. Already installed at Blanding's is Miss Peavey, a poetess. With the incoming arrival of Ralph McTodd another poet, Lord Emsworth's quiet existence is set to be disturbed.

Lord Emwsorth's son has his sights on a business opportunity but is missing one vital ingredient, the money. Lord Keeble, husband of Lady Constance has relinquished his control of his money upon marriage. He can see only one way - the theft of his wife's diamond necklace.

Phyllis, Lord Keeble's stepdaughter wants money for her husband to buy some land. Her friend, Miss Halliday is earning it by cataloguing Blanding's castle. Mr Baxter the efficient Blanding's secretary earns it by working there. To solve all the financial problems that seem to be arising enters the saviour of the day; Ronald Eustace Psmith (the p is silent):

`Peasmith, sir?'

`No, No. P-s-m-i-t-h. I should explain to you that I started life without the initial letter, and my
father always clung ruggedly to the plain Smith. But it seemed to me that there were so many Smiths in
the world that a little variety might well be introduced. Smythe I look on as a cowardly evasion, nor do
I approve of the too prevalent custom of tacking another name on in front by means of a hyphen. So I
decided to adopt the Psmith. The p, I should add for your guidance, is silent, as in phthisis, psychic,
and ptarmigan. You follow me?'

Psmith needs his own money after breaking away from the family business of fish. No job is too small or large for Psmith as long as it has nothing to do with fish.

So begins the farcical movements of the characters that Wodehouse creates and the desire to be the one that gets the diamond necklace. A joy to read and witty humour on each page as you turn, as the plot thickens and not everyone is as they seem, and all seem to have some sort of a connection to each other without even realising. It was enough to make my head spin but in such a joyous finny way.

If you have never read any Wodehouse before, then this is as good as book as any to start with. Those familiar with Jeeves and Wooster will recognise the location of the Drones Club, and their inhabitants like the monocle wearing, witty if not rather ineffectual Psmith who despite adventures seems so nonplussed about it all. I look forward to reading more of Psmith and also about Blandings Castle.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 4 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Leave it to Psmith
Leave it to Psmith by P.G. Wodehouse
3.59
Add to wishlist See buying options
Only search this product's reviews