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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brings another light onto the Everest Rescue theories
For those that have watched the Discovery Everest Series 1 DVDs, this book brings to light a lot events that occured and not shown by the documentary. However, more importantly, it adds context to the 2006 North East Ridge Everest year and some of the accounts are quite grim if not extremely worrying. I have to admit that the opening chapter really does bring home the...
Published on 30 Aug. 2010 by Mr. I. Roberts

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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Thin on detail
Don't get me wrong- this is a good read and actually quite a page turner. (I read it comfortably in a weekend). If like me you are fascinated by all things 'Everest' you won't be too disappointed but like some of the other reviewers I rather lost faith when I realised the author wasn't even there on the mountain! No matter how good the story - it rather loses credibility...
Published on 24 May 2011 by Gapmax


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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brings another light onto the Everest Rescue theories, 30 Aug. 2010
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For those that have watched the Discovery Everest Series 1 DVDs, this book brings to light a lot events that occured and not shown by the documentary. However, more importantly, it adds context to the 2006 North East Ridge Everest year and some of the accounts are quite grim if not extremely worrying. I have to admit that the opening chapter really does bring home the realities of Everest but as soon as it turned to Russell Brice's Himex organisation I thought the book was going to turn into yet another "blame it on someone else" story. I was very wrong.

The book attempts to explain why rescuing someone from above 8000m is virtually impossible and certainly impossible if the person is unconscious but it also provides a different light onto Himex and how as the largest and most capable team on the ground Russell feels responsible to other climbers on the mountain. There are countless events that requires Himex to intervene and help that, without it, the guy would have simply been another statistic. If Russell does ever get fed up of performing Everest expeditions he would be invaluable as the guy to actually create what has been discussed as an "Everest Mountain Rescue Team"! How that would work I've actually no idea because as the book clearly explains a climber whose body has closed down is not going anywhere.

Russell is obviously a very rich man now after the Discovery series 1 and 2 but so what? He has come from a humble upbringing, actually worked himself to the bone building a career as a highly successful mountaineer (no mean feat in itself) and has proved himself as a highly capable businessman. The guy actually deserves to be rich and happy - and I for one hope he is. Certainly not planning on doing Everest but if I win the Lotto there is only one team I would go with.

For those of you that are sick to death of hearing the media account of Everest disasters and want to know a little more about the massive infrastructure involved in a successful (and unsuccessful) expedition - buy the book and judge for yourself.
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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic Book, 22 Aug. 2008
Really enjoyed this - honestly is the best book I've read in a long time. Very well written, fascinating book, mixture between the history of the mountain and the events of 2006. I read it twice in one week. Highly recommended.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars fantastic, 18 Mar. 2011
This review is from: Dark Summit: The Extraordinary True Story of Everest's Most Controversial Season (Kindle Edition)
I was gripped to the book, reading through the various stories on Everest and how people deal with things was really interesting. I am not a climber but wanted to read a non fiction adventure story (already read 127hours). If anyone has any others they could recommend then feel free! I recommend this one to anyone climber or non climber, it has lots of contributions from peoples experiences and references as well as kind of making you want to have an adventure!
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Thin on detail, 24 May 2011
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Gapmax "rockhopper" (UK) - See all my reviews
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Don't get me wrong- this is a good read and actually quite a page turner. (I read it comfortably in a weekend). If like me you are fascinated by all things 'Everest' you won't be too disappointed but like some of the other reviewers I rather lost faith when I realised the author wasn't even there on the mountain! No matter how good the story - it rather loses credibility after that. Also some key facts are just plain wrong (Messner's ascent for one). This is basically a sharp account written by a journalist capitalising on a tragic year. If you want first hand accounts turn to Lincoln Hall's 'Dead Lucky' or 'The Longest Climb' by Dominic Faulkner, both of which were written by climbers there in the 2006 season. The latter led the most successful expedition there that year and apart from being a brilliant read puts everything into sharp perspective.
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Not just black and white, 2 May 2008
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J. Reeve (Bristol, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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This is an extremely well written book, that doesn't simplify the story into 'heroes and villains' as the mainstream media do. Unlike 'into thin air' or 'the climb', this isn't a first person account, which enables a more rounded and objective view of the circumstances and benefits from Heil's journalistic approach.
Those who have seen the Discovery 'Everest' series featuring Russell Brice will also find it an interesting companion piece, as it gives behind the scenes details regarding the expedition featured in the programme.
Highly recommended.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Takes you onto Everest, 28 Dec. 2010
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I really enjoyed this book as it really takes you onto the mountain and conveys the risks, challenges and madness of an Everest quest.
The book makes you want to take the challenge on while at the same time making you to dismiss any thoughts of climbing Everest as a risk too far.
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19 of 22 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting, but inaccurate?, 10 Jun. 2009
Being keen on mountain literature and having read quite a few of the recent slew of Everest books, I'd hesitate to enthusiastically recommend this one. The Brice story held my interest, though I'd say the writing style is a little contrived. However, what I found disturbing about the book was a surprising factual error. After describing Boardman and Tasker's disappearance on Everest's Northeast ridge in 1982, the author states on page 42 that whilst Brice was climbing the pinnacles, he'd have passed close to Joe Tasker's corpse lying in the snow. I am no expert on mountain history but this is a well known story, and it's Boardman's body that was found there - Tasker is still missing. This error makes me wonder how reliable the rest of the content might be; I took it all with a pinch of salt after reading that. Not one for those who like their Everest history, maybe?
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Seen the TV show - now read the book, 28 Jun. 2011
By 
Colin Winship (Coventry, England) - See all my reviews
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I decided to purchase this book after watching the television series about the 2006 mountaineering season on Mount Everest. My two main lmpressions from the series were that to achieve success on Everest requires a single mindedness that few of us probably have and that Russell Brice was not a person that I would do business with under any circumstances. Dark Summit did confirm the first of these impressions but caused me to change my view on the second. Whilst I still think that Russell Brice can be unapproachable the book shows him to also be a very caring man with his clients, and in some circumstances everybody elses, best interests at heart. A very readable and absorbing book that does not get bogged down in the technical details of mountaineering but concentrates on the human beings involved.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not very deep, inacurate., 12 Oct. 2010
The book is a relatively mundane account of Everest 2006 written by someone who was not there. The review comments on the book cover, after having read it, now seem like hyperbole. There was not much that was "shocking", there was no real exploration of "darkness". I did not get a great feel for the protagonists involved, no real feeling of depth to their personalities. It was all fairly light.

In the source notes for the book the first climb of Everest without oxygen is stated as Reinhold Messner's solo climb as recounted in The Crystal Horizon. This was not the case, it was Messner and Habeler 1978. Being wrong about a piece of information that is perhaps only second in importance to the first ascent in 1953 shows a worrying distance from the subject. If that can be wrong then many many other things can be wrong.

Workmanlike, not inspired, distant from the subject, contains inaccuracies.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A good companion to "Into the Silence", 21 Jun. 2013
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This review is from: Dark Summit: The Extraordinary True Story of Everest's Most Controversial Season (Kindle Edition)
This is a well-structured and attractively-written book about the 2006 season at Everest, when there were a number of fatalities on the higher parts of the mountain. It is not a polemic: it is written in an even-handed way but it is clear that the author cannot understand or share the conviction of those who climb on past others in trouble that that is the only thing to do at those altitudes. In a sense, the book really questions whether "commercial" expeditions - run for perhaps less experienced climbers, or for climbers who are not part of a national or sponsored expedition - are fatally flawed because there is no real sense of "team" (unlike in the dedicated expeditions of the 1920's and 1950's). Climbers have paid so much to have their "shot" at the summit that they are prepared to prioritise their own climb above that of the others in the expedition. That self-interest may in part be responsible for some of the deaths on the mountain because climbers and expedition leaders want to summit/get as many as possible to the summit; their expedition fees will not be refunded if they abort their climb to help someone else, and that leaves no-one on the mountain with an independent view-point/resources to coordinate a high-altitude rescue. In pointing out that Everest remains one of the most dangerous and inhospitable places on Earth even after 60 years of successful ascents, this book reminds the reader that such expeditions can never be undertaken lightly.
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