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28 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars When tomorrow will be just as today., 5 Mar. 2010
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This review is from: There's Always Tomorrow [Masters of Cinema] [DVD] [1956] (DVD)
This is an overlooked gem by Douglas Sirk, a truly original and great director, who brought European subtlety and irony to the American melodrama and managed to convey deep emotions and social conscience within the conventions of Hollywood in the 40s and 50s. Fred MacMurray -here at his very best- manufactures toys and has ended up being himself a sort of toy in the hands of his proper and apparently ideal family. Just a provider for his wife and daughters and son, that totally ignore his needs and take him for granted. Caught in a hellish suburbian bliss, an unexpected encounter with an old friend from his youth, that secretly always loved him (magnificent Barbara Stanwyck), seems to give him a new lease on life. ¿But can he escape and find happiness with her, putting aside his familly? Sirk's alertness and fine direction, with a camera that makes meaningful every movement and every frame, carries the story with masterful hand to its ironic and deeply satisfying finale. Excellent transfer of the beautifully photographed b&w film. The interesting extras are plenty and the booklet meaty, as we have come to expect from this fine series by Eureka. Highly recommended.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Under-stated brilliance, 27 July 2010
By 
Glyn C. Smith - See all my reviews
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This review is from: There's Always Tomorrow [Masters of Cinema] [DVD] [1956] (DVD)
I saw this movie as a kid and always remembered it but didn't understand why until I caught it, when an adult, on t.v. Even then I wasn't well versed in the movies of Douglas Sirk.

I now know that I saw many of his movies years ago,(but didn't connect them), and each one left an impression that still lingers. This film was probably his most intimate and, whilst understated: b&w photography, (not box office at that time...yet an example of superb cinematography - comparable to Sweet Smell of Success), about 'little' people - their regrets and dreams; it is actually an incisive analysis of the emasculation of the, (american/universal?), middle-aged male, taken for granted by his family - loved - yes but not known/understood/noticed by his children or busy wife.

This film could have been corny in lesser hands but wasn't and remains, 50+ years later, pretty relevant in it's theme and still isn't dated. Admittedly the opening credits are typical '50s melodrama and, when viewing it, it's not until about 10 minutes in you realise that this is not what you expected from what has just gone before.

This is undoubtably Sirk's masterpiece, (but you can argue over that), however it is the players that elevate Sirk's work to perfection.

Can anyone identify a performance of Fred MacMurray's that equals this? (His 'Double Indemnity' was brilliant admittedly; yet here he hits many more layers of humam emotion).

Barbara Stanwyck: probably the most versatile of american Hollywood actresses, gives us a masterclass performance here; she underplays, to absolute perfection, (saving the sparks until they really, really matter).
With 'The Lady Eve' & 'Double Indemnity' this is her finest performance.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great Restoration, 26 Sept. 2010
By 
Adrian Drew (UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: There's Always Tomorrow [Masters of Cinema] [DVD] [1956] (DVD)
"There's Always Tomorrow" is one of Douglas Sirk's bleakest films and it presents the tragic fate of Fred MacMurray and Barbara Stanwyck, two middle aged characters thrown together in their mutual isolation. At just 80 mts the film, powerfully photographed in monochrome by Sirk's favourite camerman Russell Metty,communicates perfectly the pain of frustrated love and equally frustrated lives. Offering no easy solutions, its ending is uncompromising and almost Bergmanesque in its brutality. A minor work undoubtedly but certainly a powerful one too. As an added bonus, as well as the trailer, there is an excellent hour long documentary about this important film maker which finally answers many of the questions which critics have speculated about for a generation. Why does he really employ so many mirrors? How does he use colour? Why did he shoot "Tarnished Angels" in black and white? Why all those staircases and impressively positioned screens shadows, in his mise en scene. The DVD provides an outstanding print,excellently re-mastered and in the correct ratio too.... What more can we ask for?
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Less melo than the others but really Sirk., 25 Oct. 2011
This review is from: There's Always Tomorrow [Masters of Cinema] [DVD] [1956] (DVD)
Eureka gives us a great tranfer, great extras and a very interesting booklet. This movie deserves to be seen, as much as the most famous movies by Sirk.
Fred McMurray is memorable in this movie. Barbara Stanwyck and Joan Bennett are brilliant too but the performance of Fred is really touching.
The way Sirk "paints" the children is really unexpected and quite modern, like in "All That Heaven Allows".
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars a film of exquisite performances and shape, 20 Jan. 2015
By 
schumann_bg - See all my reviews
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This review is from: There's Always Tomorrow [Masters of Cinema] [DVD] [1956] (DVD)
This exquisite film is perhaps the most satisfying of all Douglas Sirk's films. The basic premise is that a husband and father of three children meets a friend from his youth who had always held a candle for him, but never said, and wouldn't say so now, but then a photograph falls out of her bag. The maelstrom of emotion this unleashes is totally mesmerising, and not at all cliched in the way it is worked out, with the adult son playing a crucial role. All the problems of middle-aged life are here, and in a mere 80 minutes Sirk gives a remarkably rounded portrait, in superb black and white images that have a concrete rightness and beauty. The score is ever-present, as you find in all his films, moulding the texture along with the dialogues that have something of the Cadillac about them - big, smooth, reassuringly stylish, and yet cutting through to the reality of the thrill of high speed. What makes it particularly special is the central trio - Fred MacMurray carries every nuance of his successful but hapless character, Barbara Stanwyck is wonderful as the friend from the past, not at all vampish, but a genuinely likeable and alluring presence. For me, what crowns the film is that you get not one but two remarkable middle-aged actresses, the other being Joan Bennett as the wife. She had been brilliant a few years before in Ophuls' The Reckless Moment, but I didn't realise there was another role of the mother holding it all together as we see here. She is grace itself, as is Stanwyck, and the presentation of these women, the male in crisis, and the spot-on portrait of adolescent children who understand and yet don't, fully, is a magnificent achievement. In fact the parallel with the Ophuls seems necessary: two of the finest Hollywood films of the era made by German-born directors, both shaping their material with such assurance, such a feel for beauty on screen, yet subtly carved from different elements. And both films overlooked, an error put right, partly at least, by their DVD releases, this one being as upholstered as the seating in that smooth, roomy American classic ...
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars masters of cinema. masterpiece!, 31 Mar. 2013
This review is from: There's Always Tomorrow [Masters of Cinema] [DVD] [1956] (DVD)
This is one of my favourite films. Firstly the DVD transfer is excellent. The story is very moving. Fred MacMurray plays a really good guy - hard worker, loving father and husband - who is neglected and taken for granted somewhat by his family.

A really wonderful look at family life.

The acting is superb. Every role is brilliantly done. Fred MacMurray and Barbara Stanwyk are exceptional. Her speech to the children has so much maturity in it!

The lesson on what is worthwhile and of true value in our lives as opposed to temporary pleasures is extremely moving.

We are so fortunate that this has been released. I urge you to buy this and support Masters of Cinema. One of the silver screens greatest (Barbara Stanwyk) in one of her finest roles. A film to be rewatched again and again.
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1 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Stanwyck strutting her fallen woman stuff, 24 Mar. 2013
By 
W. Russell - See all my reviews
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This review is from: There's Always Tomorrow [Masters of Cinema] [DVD] [1956] (DVD)
This is a really preposterous tale in which mother, who has left the family and gone on the stage - not very successfully - returns to the small town she left and her dreary schoolmaster husband when teenage daughter asks her to attend a performance she is given in the high school play. The lass dreams of being an actress - which on the evidence of the film is pur Mrs Worthington stuff. Anyway Barbara comes home, Father abandons fellow schoolmistrees who has been longing to become his new wife, and everyone lives happily ever after. As if. But Stanwyck was a star, a lady who could seize the screen and make sure nobody else on camera was worth looking at something she did in good and bad films. This is not one of her good ones, but it passes the time and is worth collecting if you want to follow her career.
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There's Always Tomorrow [Masters of Cinema] [DVD] [1956]
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