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The London American Label Year By Year 1961
Format: Audio CDChange
Price:£10.15+Free shipping with Amazon Prime

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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on 7 September 2010
This compilation is a great mix of some of 'Londons' hits from 1961.London were BIG and we always thought that they were exciting records coming from that Label. I bought some of these records as 45's and the cost was 50% of my Paper Round money. I still think they are good entertainment and very listenable.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 8 December 2010
The 1961 London American compilation from Ace Records is a great listen. A well assembled choice of tracks from the well known to the obscure, with some of those tracks you know so well, but haven't heard since they were first released. Generous sleeve notes and excellent reproduction make this a must, especially if you were into the music scene in the early 1960's.

Go on..............click "BUY". You are in for a treat!
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18 of 21 people found the following review helpful
on 19 March 2010
I was a teenager in the late 50s/early 60s and we grew up with the London American label. When I saw this series of CDs they became a "must have" product, just the cover design has brought back so many memories. To all those boomers out there, start collecting this series. I guarantee you won't be disappointed.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 1 December 2011
When I first had a record player only had a small collection of records because couldn't afford many.
Use to spend hours playing them and the energy and excitement that came out of that small record player was amazing.

First record I ever bought was Tower Of Strength by Frankie Vaughan.

You can't beat these old classics from the late 50's / early 60's. I have now got the complete series of these London American Year by Year CDs.

A great mix of hits and lesser known tracks, from an era when it was a much more simplistic approach to the music. I love these CDs and very well documented with excellent sleeve notes.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
This series takes me back when you could buy three singles for a quid.
I remeber listening to them in my local cafe, where they belted out from the juke box while we had our "frothy coffee".
A terrific series for us oldies, and songs we could sing along with when "we never had it so good".
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on 21 February 2014
I bought this CD primarily to obtain the three " twist " numbers : " " Twist-Her " ; " Peppermint Twist " ; and , especially , the excellent " Spanish Twist ". I already have most of the other familiar songs , but there are a few interesting obscure tracks , e.g. , those by Buddy Knox , Marvin Rainwater , Miriam Johnson , and Al Tousan. Very worth-while purchase for fans of early '60s pop music.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
The label survived up to 1976 after which it became ffrr issuing mainly British new wave.In the 70s it was the main U K source for the HI label and also began issuing things from the American label of the same name-which had actually begun it in the late 40s.There was also a Canadian London label which represnted by Vick Baker and Barbara Cummings.
By 1976 London was reissuing past hits and was able to put out the Newbeats when the Hickory label passed to Decca after Pye and its how the label landed a huge hit single with Run Baby Run
Its hardly surprising so few London singles were selling as people tended to go for what was played on the radio as a new American hit.Money was not as plentiful as it is today when the collector now pays daft money on EBay. No one could have done that in the 50s as there was no such thing as the record collector till the Beatles years.
What you saw advertised in the music press was a page of new releases shared with other Decca labels like Brunswick or RCA and anything you'd never heard of would remain that way.There was little interest in stuff people had never heard of like Sonny Burgess
On this CD is Danny Peppermint & the Jumpin' Jacks who had 3 singles and an album issued here all doomed to failure.No one knew who they were and it would remain that way until collectors mags in the States like Goldmine began to discover some of these names noting that here was a non existent group who were no more than Carleton session musicians who had not only cashed in on the Joey Dee & the Starlighters' hit but never even bothered to change the title.Fans were just not aware there had been so much faking in the music business.That the well respected Johnny Burnette Trio had never been heard other than a very rare Von single which predated Coral by 2 years.No one knew that the Johnny Burnette Trio were via their Coral records basically session musicians with a drums played by a non drummer called Henry Jerome who was an A & R man at the company-yet that became the sound of the RnR Trio as the economic use of drums made a unique sound.This CD included both Burnette brothers-Johnny had gone total high school by this time while Dorsey ramined country
And this becomes the most interesting aspect of collecting-musical failure.Which is more interesting than British failure for the simple reason that muach of it is hard to trace.It is though getting better by the week when the German Bear Family label spend months trying to find some artist who disappeared 50 years ago.Like Mary Johnson who used the custom service to make a disc and the master tape was kept by Jack Clement and dumped in the vaults for over 50 years for no good reason.
The research was to prove that Mary Johnson had become quite famous through the years through her many name changes including Jeannie Green who cut an LP for Elektra.However Sun never issued that many Sun singles and one they did issue was vernon Taylor's version of Mystery Train which seemed unessential as it had flopped in the States
At the most the average fan could afford around 3 singles a week.Fortuantely I had a tape recorder as well so I could tape entire programs off Luxemburg.Thats where I first heard Danny Peppermint & the Jumping Jacks-which I'm sure was not on sale here till 1962.That's how I heard Clay Cole,Tony Gunner and Babs Tino to name but 3 who bubbled under.
Another good source for failed London singles was the bargain bins.Shops tended to stock all the new release as there was nowhere near the amount which came later.It was the only way you heard the B sides-thus in the days before the pirates you may hear Barbara Chandler's I'm going out with the girls-a wonderful example of Pixie Girl pop-and find on the B side an exquite ballad called It's gonna be a lonely New Year.
Today you can buy the entire output of both these Pixies on a label called Cat King Cole
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 10 February 2011
Exactly as specified......it reflected a selection of American records for this year, that could generally only be heard by buying the single on the London American label. American songs were not heard on the radio stations as the stations were very limited, except the American top 100 show on Luxembourg [208 medium wave] on a Friday evening at 10.0 pm and then the reception washed in and out !
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