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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Rabbi's advice? - Be a Good boy!
On the face of it "A Serious Man" is a movie showing the life of a forty something Jew Larry Goplik falling apart. His wife announces that she is seeing a much older man and wants a divorce. His teenage children ignore him. He is a professor at a local college and his hopeful of getting tenure. However one of his students is very unhappy with his grades and seems to be...
Published on 9 Jun 2011 by haunted

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars bland
I am an appreciative and admirative fan from the Coen Brothers' work, but this movie did not do it for me. I probably did not get it but I found it bland and boring. First time I feel this watching one of their movies.
Published on 19 Oct 2011 by Ramses


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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Rabbi's advice? - Be a Good boy!, 9 Jun 2011
By 
This review is from: A Serious Man [DVD] (DVD)
On the face of it "A Serious Man" is a movie showing the life of a forty something Jew Larry Goplik falling apart. His wife announces that she is seeing a much older man and wants a divorce. His teenage children ignore him. He is a professor at a local college and his hopeful of getting tenure. However one of his students is very unhappy with his grades and seems to be threatening to throw a spanner in the works.

He is at his wits end and decides to ask his local rabbi for advice. He eventually sees (or rather tries to see) three different rabbis, with mixed results to say the least.

Like all Coen movies it is brilliantly made and has some great darkly comic moments. You get the feeling the Coens are toying with the viewer though. They hint that great revelations will occur but finish the movie with an ambiguous (but probably appropriate) ending. They also throw in an apparently unrelated opening scene, set in a Jewish village in pre war Poland.

After his Bar Mitzvah Larry's son does one better than his father and meets the most senior rabbi, renowned for his learning and wisdom. After quoting from a "Jefferson Airplane" song the rabbi's main piece of advice is to "be a good boy".

Perhaps that's what the Coen's are saying in this movie. Good and bad things happen in life. There is probably no grand design to it. All you can do is to try "to be a good boy".
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Like a lot of things in life, no solution is offered..., 4 Dec 2010
This review is from: A Serious Man [DVD] (DVD)
I can't say that this is a typical Coen Brothers' film because all of their films seem to be one of a kind. But, there is an element which can be said to be common to all: Life is steeped in confusion, unpredictable, and at many times unjust. Many of the elements of this film are better appreciated if you are of the Jewish religion or are familiar with Jewish customs, but that does not mean you can't enjoy it if you are not. I think that the Nihilist ideas expressed in it are familiar to all: when we ask, what is the meaning of Life, we all seem to come up with the same answer: there is no answer, just a deafening silence from the Universe, God, Buddha, your religion, or whatever you choose to place your faith on. The most unsettling thing about the film is the ending, which leads me to believe that it had a lot to do with the lack of success in the commercial market. But, one thing you can rely on in a Cohen film is that the acting and production values will always be dead-on, and this is no exception. I did miss, though, some of their "regulars": Steve Buscemi, Francis McDormand, Jon Plito, et. al.
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37 of 43 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Cruel, dark and infuriating- classic Coen Brothers., 21 May 2010
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This review is from: A Serious Man [DVD] (DVD)
This film came as a great relief to me... I was seriously convinced that my beloved Coens had lost it altogether. I hadn't really enjoyed one of their films since The Man Who Wasn't There; Intolerable Cruelty, The Ladykillers, Burn After Reading and yes, even the lauded to the high heavens No Country For Old Men all left me cold. This film was the first time in a decade I didn't bother going to the cinema to see a new Coen Brothers film, because I just expected more disappointment. I eventually rented it last week, and it massively exceeded my expectations, being fresh, funny and consistently entertaining.
It tells the story of a middle aged jewish man in the sixties whose life is falling to pieces- his wife is unfaithful, his promotion is being threatened by a disgruntled student who is prepared to resort to bribery and blackmail to attain a passing grade, his son is in love with the counter culture and is more interested in getting high and listening to Jefferson Airplane than preparing for his Bar Mitzvah (and who can blame him!) Desperate for help, he goes to see three Rabbis who, as you'd expect from a Coen Brothers film, run the gamut from a bit weird to colourfully insane.
A lot of the negative reviews here make complaints I can sympathise with; yes, it doesn't go anywhere, it has long, seemingly irrelevant bits, the beginning and ending are both confusing and obtuse and offer no explanation whatsoever; its weird for weirds sake, its pretentious, its elitist arty nonsense, too clever for its own good etc.... often with independent films I find just these kind of things extremely offputting. Like most people, I don't like feeling stupid, so when things confuse me I get frustrated; but this film was so charming I didn't mind being stumped by the significance of the opening scene, about Jewish peasants receiving a visit from an evil spirit called a 'dybbuk', or the ending, which I won't disclose. I also didn't mind that it didn't go through a routine beginning, middle and end and resolve itself, because its that kind of playful spirit and desire to keep things original, even while riffing on genre staples, that make the Coen Brothers' films special. And now I can happily go back to looking forward to their next film.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Coen Brothers' Most Personal Film, 19 Jun 2013
By 
Keith M - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: A Serious Man [DVD] (DVD)
This 2009 film written, produced and directed by the Coen brothers is a darkly comic and poignant tale of a troubled man, Jewish college professor, Larry Gopnik (played with great skill and pathos by Michael Stuhlbarg). It is (probably) typical of these two most innovative of film-makers that, in the wake of their most lauded (critically and commercially) film, 2007's No Country For Old Men, they should turn to what is a very intimate, low-key and (as is their wont) quirky tale, with a distinctly autobiographical feel (being set in late 1960s Minnesota) and a film that is totally bereft of big (or even middling) name stars. A Serious Man is, however, most definitely an 'authentic' Coen brothers film (arguably the most distinctive example in their adopted style since 2000's O Brother, Where Art Thou?), featuring some beautifully evocative cinematography from regular collaborator Roger Deakins and a typically vibrant soundtrack (including music by Jefferson Airplane and Jimi Hendrix).

In their central character, the Coens have created something of a microcosm of US small-town Jewishness, encapsulating all its frustrations with religious faith, marital fidelity, family well-being, professional ambition and paranoid dread. As I watched the film, I couldn't shake the image of one of the greatest of all Jewish film-makers, Woody Allen, and in particular his famous line (from Broadway Danny Rose), 'I'm guilty all the time and I never did anything'. Larry's life is just one disaster (or curse, as depicted in the film's opening 'dybbuk' sequence) after another, his mid-life angst being fuelled by an unhappy wife, bickering kids, a troubled live-in brother, personal health paranoia, religious strictures, a corrupt student, job insecurity, irritating mail order record companies and a set of eccentric neighbours (including a glamorous, pot-smoking serial seducer and a gun-toting, hunting, respectable family man fascist).

Acting-wise, Stuhlbarg's central performance is brilliant, totally convincing in its portrayal of bewilderment, conformity, stoicism, subservience and eventually anger (such as during the brilliant scene where he is pinned down on the phone by the Columbia Record Club to settle debts, unbeknown to him, that have been incurred by his son, 'I haven't done anything!'). In addition, acting plaudits should go to Sarri Lennick's depiction of Larry's feisty and duplicitous wife, Judith, whilst Fred Melamed turns in a near-film stealing performance as Judith's intended, the smooth-talking, self-satisfied, touchy-feely Sy Ableman (Sy's insistence on reassuringly hugging Larry on each occasion that they meet is one of the film's funniest running gags). Also, as might be expected in a Coen brothers' film, there are many great supporting character performances by the assembled cast of policemen, lawyers, teachers, doctors and rabbis.

Deakins delivers many great idiosyncratic visual touches, in keeping with most of the Coens' work, comprising lingering close-ups, slow pans and odd camera angles. In terms of where A Simple Man fits within the Coens' oeuvre, its focus on a central character's frustrations and paranoia (for me) calls most readily to mind one of their masterpieces, Barton Fink. Whilst I don't rate this later film in quite the same league as the 1991 film - I think A Simple Man does begin to lose its way during its second half, before providing an interesting, if not altogether satisfying, denouement - this later effort, for me, certainly merits its place in the brothers' impressive body of work.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars bland, 19 Oct 2011
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This review is from: A Serious Man [DVD] (DVD)
I am an appreciative and admirative fan from the Coen Brothers' work, but this movie did not do it for me. I probably did not get it but I found it bland and boring. First time I feel this watching one of their movies.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars What the??!!, 23 Mar 2010
By 
Mr. R. W. Graham (Lincoln, U.K.) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This is one of the coen brothers funniest films. Absolutely hillarious and barking mad too, and probably the weirdest film the coen brothers have ever done. The great unknown cast are hillarious, michael stulberg being the standout in the lead as a man on the edge of a nervous breakdown, or at least, that's what i thought was going on! Very easy to see why this is a huge hit with critics, but non coen brothers fans might wonder what all the fuss is about.
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24 of 30 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Diamonds are forever, 9 Jan 2010
By 
Nikolaos Oikonomidis (Thessaloniki Greece) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: A Serious Man [DVD] (DVD)
After a period in which my love for the Cohen brothers' movies was diminished, mainly due to the feeling that their own personal style I very much admired in movies such as Barton Fink, Fargo, Raising Arisona, The Miller Crossing and Hudsucker Proxy was beginning to suffer from repetition, I welcomed with enthousiasm what I sensed as their comeback (in my heart, at least), not with the generally acclaimed No country for the old man, but with Burn after reading, which I considered fantastic. And then along came A serious man, which in my opinion, is their definite masterpiece and also a rare film for these times of mediocracy. It is not the meanings, it is not the form, it is not the story; in the greatest of films it' s the feeling that you have a unique experience of another world, created by the minds and the hands of some genuine masters. This is the case of A serious man. Absolutely fabulous for all the possible reasons. A movie to die for.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Very Weird, But Enjoyable, Coen Brothers Film - Like No Other They Have Made. Great on Blu-ray, 23 Nov 2011
I'm a big fan of most Coen brothers films, probably all except the rather pointless and ineffective 'The Ladykillers' have many good points with some ('Fargo', 'No Country for Old Men') bordering on brilliance, but this more recent effort really tested me - it is occasionally enigmatic and is potentially 'inaccessible' for many due to some very significant 'quirks', most of which are not of the type normally associated with these writer/directors.

For me, watching it could be likened to the overall appearance of a blemished sandwich, a mouldy top slice of bread (the start of the film), a delicious filling (the majority middle part) and an odd offcut bottom piece of bread (the ending !) - fortunately this film is eaten top to bottom, so you get rid of the unpleasant taste of the start quite quickly and are left only mildly dissatisfied by the end (courtesy of the unsatisfactory bottom slice of bread). Don't get me wrong, I completely understood the ending and to a degree it fits in with the overall 'enigmatic' nature of the film (especially the beginning), but it is only suggestive rather than definitive - but I suppose that does at least allow the viewers mind to wander and/or ponder....I hope my intentional vagueness tempts you to audition this film !

A bonus is that on Blu-ray the presentation is superb, with a vivid and gloriously sharp picture and a clear, if essentially dialogue-driven, soundtrack.

The overall plot is not that complicated, and is especially easy for me to describe as I won't (in part, can't !) explain the opening in any meaningful way and will not be tempted to outline too much of the rest (unlike others, including the Amazon synopsis) as it is revelationary, so mentioning it would spoil things for first-time viewers. Essentially, the story is set in the late '60s and covers the ever-increasing series of traumatic events which befall a Jewish (it is SO pertinent to state the specifics of his religion) Physics university professor in both his professional and domestic life almost immediately after we 'meet' him.

However, before we get to this main part of the story we have to first endure (and boy do I mean that !) a lengthy, quite bizarre, opening scene which must be very personally important to the Coens as I have yet to fathom what relevance it has to the rest of the film and didn't understand it at all; all I can say is that it (apparently) is set some time in the past, occurs within a house occupied by a married couple, features dialogue in Yiddish (there are forced English subtitles and it's presented in full-frame format) and portrays a scene where a clearly unwanted visitor enters - watch and be confused..... The pertinence of that opening is brought into focus by watching the first extra on the disc, where the Coens 'fess up' that it really does have no real relevance to the film and that it was created by them as an opener in the same way that films long ago started with a cartoon (I'll take their word for it - it must have been before my time because whilst I do remember often lengthy single pre-film adverts when I went to the cinema in the 60s/early 70s I never saw anything like THAT !).

We are then transported to present times (of the film ie 1967) to see, what presumably was up until then, the 'normal' life of said professor rapidly collapse around him courtesy of a series of ever-worsening situations and dilemmas of a very personal nature. It is clear very little that occurs is his fault and he is very much the victim, which explains why he becomes depressed, confused and very desperate; his state of mind is clearly profoundly affected, prompting him to seek assistance in order to try and make sense of his crumbling world...... It can be quite excruciating to witness the bizarre behaviour, logic and attitudes which are presented to him and it becomes easy to understand how he quickly becomes so 'lost'. Very dark, yet extremely humorous, although unique the overall sense from 'A Serious Man' is similar to how the life of the car salesman, Jerry Lundegaard (played superbly by William H Macy), disintegrates in the earlier (excellent) Coen brothers film 'Fargo'. However, in this film a LOT of the 'flavour' is unarguably VERY Jewish in the most stark sense possible, not just courtesy of 'that' opening scene but also because much of the assistance sought is provided by the local Rabbi.

And that's it, no embellishment of those dilemmas or the ending - you've got to watch it for yourself as I think there are many sub-surface 'messages'. I will hopefully unearth them over time as I intend to watch this film many times ! The only thing I will add is that the period production qualities are superb and that the lead character is played to huge effect by Michael Stuhlbarg, an actor previously unknown to me, and everyone else contributes with great success.

As hinted at earlier, on Blu-ray everything is presented quite marvellously - a lovely rich, if a slightly washed-out picture and a clear DTS-HD Master Audio soundtrack (perhaps a bit OTT as most of what we hear is dialogue). True to form, the Coens provide no commentary - perhaps more necessary here than usual, if for no other reason that they might have explained more fully the background and content of the opening ! There are also a few short production featurettes. Deliciously dark and enigmatic, this film is well worth catching and is likely to mean different things to different people (especially if you're Jewish !) but is likely to be enjoyed by all; for me it sits towards the upper-end of the Coen brothers 'barometer of excellence', but could go higher after more viewings....
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9 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A comedy about the meaning of everything, 9 April 2010
By 
J. Jenkins (Dudley Port, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: A Serious Man [DVD] (DVD)
Some of the most demanding film watching experiences can also be the most rewarding. Those films which allow for mystery and ambiguity, which don't hand you every answer on a plate or make every point with a signpost often make for most involving and stimulating, and also for a cracking debate down the pub afterwards.

David Lynch is one of the masters of this, but he also showed you can take it too far with his last offering, Inland Empire, a film that seemed as though it could literally mean anything. My mom, (herself a fan of Lynch) came up with a good simile after watching The Coen Brothers latest, similarly oblique, offering. "It's like doing a jigsaw puzzle. If you've just got one or two pieces missing, you want to press on. But if you can't see where any of the pieces go, you just give up."

For me, A Serious Man falls just the right side of impenetrability. But the jigsaw analogy is still a good one; the brothers present their material here in disorientating, fragmentary fashion; short choppy scenes that feel like unfinished bullet points, full of tantalising non-sequiturs. I thought I was getting a domestic drama, what I got felt more like a total head trip.

The story focuses on teacher and self-stlyed 'Serious Man' Larry Gopnik, (played with fretful incredulity by Michael Stuhlbarg) who fears his life may be taking a turn for the worst as his son's Bah Mitzvah approaches. His wife is leaving him for passive-aggressive colleague Sy Abelman; a stoic Korean student is blackmailing him for a better grade; his kids pester him for nose jobs and better TV reception; a mail order record club chases him for payment; his aggressively WASP-y neighbour mows part of the Gopnik lawn.

Larry imbues all of these problems, trivial and important, with ecumenical significance. Why is he suffering? Is the brother he has invited into his home (Curb Your Enthusiasm's Richard Kind) a cursed Dybbuk? Are the trials a test of Larry's faith? Or can the uncertainty principle and parallel worlds theories he teaches provide an explanation? Whatever you may think, get ready for a final scene that turns everything on it's head.

The Coens have explored this bleak, existential territory before, in films like Barton Fink and The Man Who Wasn't There. While A Serious Man isn't, for me, as riotously funny as the former or as emotionally devastating as the latter, it is without doubt intellectually bracing fare and should gratify anyone who feels in on the cosmic joke.
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9 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Existential Masterpiece, 2 April 2010
This review is from: A Serious Man [DVD] (DVD)
Chaos reigns in this world and there is nothing we can do to change this reality. The Coen Brothers have once again produced a picture of breathtaking quality expertly photographed by Roger Deakins. At turns funny and deathly depressing this was without doubt the film of 2009. If you enjoy interesting, challenging Hollywood pictures littered with excellent performances (especially by Fred Melamed as Sy Albeman - perhaps the years most disgusting movie villain) then you can do no better than purchase this DVD. In many ways A Serious Man should be seen as the natural follow up to No Country for Old Men with the bad luck of Larry Gopnik providing a perhaps even more frightening exploration of our precarious existence than that represented by Anton Chigurh.
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A Serious Man [DVD] by Joel Coen (DVD - 2010)
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