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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Surprisingly fantastic
I have to admit that, back in 2006, when the Horrors first emerged I was, pardon the pun, horrified. Their old sound was generic and they stank of the style over substance nonsense that the NME had come to adore; nothing but a product of the hype machine. Fast forward to 2009, however, and things are completely different. The "quirky" magazine-friendly image is still...
Published on 30 Oct 2009 by L. Mcloughlin

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The Horrors - Primary Colours
Let's all accept that the influences are worn openly on this album whether it be My Bloody Valentine, Can, Jesus and the Mary Chain, Siouxsie and the Banshees and Joy Division. But this is not a bad thing indeed this is a very good album (in places) although by no means the groundbreaking stunner claimed by music papers like the NME. Indeed we must all hope that this band...
Published on 11 May 2009 by Red on Black


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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Surprisingly fantastic, 30 Oct 2009
By 
L. Mcloughlin "el_sid_123" (Manchester) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Primary Colours (Audio CD)
I have to admit that, back in 2006, when the Horrors first emerged I was, pardon the pun, horrified. Their old sound was generic and they stank of the style over substance nonsense that the NME had come to adore; nothing but a product of the hype machine. Fast forward to 2009, however, and things are completely different. The "quirky" magazine-friendly image is still there, but this time the band have remembered to write some decent tunes too. They also decided that, rather than copy the bands they idolised, they could take the bits they liked, mix them together with other bits and make something new and exciting. Large elements of Primary Colours sound a bit like other bands, but it's safe to say that none of those bands ever made a sound quite like this. The Jesus and Mary Chain, Joy Division, Siousxie and The Banshess, MBV, Can, Neu!: it's all here, but it's never in doubt that you're listening to any other band. With an array of experimental sounds and plenty of feedback throw in to the equation, it's clear when listening that great care has gone into every track. Each song rewards repeated listens and all of them contain plenty to like beyond the obvious. Credit here surely goes to the production team, who, by all accounts, helped to bring out the best in the band creatively as well as adding their own particular talents to proceedings. That the album shares 4 production credits (one of which being the band themselves) is, I feel, one of the reasons that each track sounds distinctive, and there are many different sounds explored throughout the course of the ten tracks. Because of this, the album sounds great as a whole; something that is sadly lacking with a lot of releases lately. With many albums at the moment sounding like a collection of disparate tracks thrown together, it's nice to hear a cohesive piece of work that stands up as a great album. As much as I'd have wanted to hate this album a few years ago, I can't help but admit that it's amazing. Definitely the sound of a band evolving into something new and improved. Perhaps it's not for everyone, but it's definitely for me. Regardless of any past, ahem, horrors, they may have committed.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Simply sublime, 11 April 2010
By 
Mr. S. Williamson (Leicester, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Primary Colours (Audio CD)
Tis not hype that caused a sizeable proportion of crtics to declare this 'Album of the Year', twas talent. The Horrors have managed to create what the Doves have always tried to - an aural landscape that sucks you in and lets you float in it for forty-five minutes. No two tracks are the same and each one gels into the next perfectly. It takes a lot for a crusty 47 year old grandfather to get excited but this album did it with out any effort what so ever. Buy and enjoy.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Totally unexpected but brilliant, 6 Jan 2010
By 
Jonathan Davies (Ashbourne, Derbyshire) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Primary Colours (Audio CD)
Happened upon this album by chance and nearly didn't listen to it, remembering their first pretty average goth rock album and the Peaches Geldof association (never a good sign). Well, I doubt that there has ever been a bigger turnaround from first to second album in terms of style and quality. Its definitely a Screamadelica-type line in the sand and the Horrors have created a landmark album.

Overall, Primary Colours is a fantastic album of sonic, hazy soundscapes and great guitar hooks. MBV for the 21st century. Also saw them recently at the Forum and they were great live as well. They can no longer be dismissed as ludicrous goth rockers. Essential listening.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The Horrors - Primary Colours, 11 May 2009
By 
Red on Black - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Primary Colours (Audio CD)
Let's all accept that the influences are worn openly on this album whether it be My Bloody Valentine, Can, Jesus and the Mary Chain, Siouxsie and the Banshees and Joy Division. But this is not a bad thing indeed this is a very good album (in places) although by no means the groundbreaking stunner claimed by music papers like the NME. Indeed we must all hope that this band has time to develop further and is not subject to a Strokes style "raise them up and knock them down" approach. Whatever the case "Primary Colours" is by no means as derivative as the recent White Lies album (which I must admit I mistook for the Editors when I heard some of it on the radio) and contains some really excellent songs

Indie rock of this nature is a well worn path and it is hard to bring originality to the party. To be fair to the Horrors they do at least try. The flaunting of German influences on the last four of minutes of the long single "Sea within a Sea" is an interesting new angle which takes them in directions that go well beyond the average indie guitar riff band. Absolutely stunning stuff and please more of this.

But my nagging doubt remains. When the Horrors try to break out of the usual riffery and experiment on tracks such as "Scarlet Fields" and "Mirrors Image" they howl real potential. Alternatively with other tracks like "I cant control myself" and "Who can say" they could easily pay royalties to Howard Devoto of Magazine or even Robert Smith of the Cure. We have heard this a million times before and in some cases done a lot better. The question must be posed in addition if this is the best that British bands can currently muster then the lack of ambition and any startling new departures sees rock music in the UK (with the wonderful exception of Radiohead) stuck in an indie rut from which it can't seem to escape. John Peel once complained about to many "white boys with guitars" in his Festive 50 and more than ever this has salience today. Still rather than end glass half empty let us hope that the Horrors develop further and perhaps leave the six strings even further back in the mix on the next album.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars No sign of "difficult second album" syndrome here, 4 Sep 2009
This review is from: Primary Colours (Audio CD)
Rarely do I get an album and then play it all the way through several times a day for days on end, which is what I'm doing with The Horrors follow-up album. From start to finish this is a top album. Yes the influences are there for everyone to see, but so what? I like the fact that there's a song which sounds a bit like David Gedge from the Wedding Present singing for My Bloody Valentine (Three Decades) and that the final song (Sea Within A Sea) has a keyboard style influenced by 70's German music. These two tracks are my favourites on the entire album. There are traces of the old Horrors style left, most noticeably on New Ice Age, but the guys should be congratulated for not producing Strange House MKII. Unless someone else comes up with an absolute stormer of a record in the next three months, I can see Primary Colours easily being my album of the year.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best album I have heard all year, 22 July 2009
By 
J. Daniel "Jimmy" (UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Primary Colours (Audio CD)
I would never have bought this album myself, but I got it as part of Rough Trade album clubs Album of the month a couple of months back. I was always put off by the Horrors style over substance image, the few singles I heard from their first album made no mpact on me whatsoever, and reading all the hype before the release of this album put me off even further. But like I say it arrived in the post one day so I put it on, and it quite simple blew me away. OK so there is very little originality here, the MBV and JAMC as well as the Krautrock influences are there for all to hear. But Geoff Barrows production and the songs go hand in hand to make a truly special album, finished off with the quite sublime track Sae within a sea. A must have album.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Strange Haus, 13 May 2009
By 
Gannon (Manchester, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Primary Colours (Audio CD)
Few people have ever been in doubt that the Horrors have cracking record collections, a collective eye for natty threads, as well as coercible hairdressers. It was a pity therefore that they seemed intent on strangling their musical endeavours with a selection of broken pedals and their own hype. They were black and white, style over substance.

That was then. Primary Colours now shifts their monochrome focus into a more vivid arena. Little has been cut however from Strange House, but plenty has been added. Notably, it's in with intelligible organ, Joy Division homages and My Bloody Valentine drone. Tellingly, it's out with schlock-shock screaming, faux-goth and stubborn resistance to include a tune. Primary Colours contorts from curiosity into contender really rather quickly.

As Strange House hinted at surf-punk, Primary Colours hints at spectral girl groups, distorted, of course on `Who Can Say'. `I Can't Control Myself' has persuaded Spiritualized's `Come Together' to guest on its own re-imagining. Elsewhere it's Bauhaus grooming a fledgling Cramps, the title track is Jesus & Mary Chain as fronted by the sombre ghost of Ian Curtis. 7-minute closer, `Sea Within A Sea', is a joyously optimistic show of synth, which, if a little light in itself, is a krautrock paean to triumph in adversity, a tacit statement of self-assured self, a told-you-so to the naysayers.

Its knockers will still cite originality as a major downfall, but there is an art to pastiche, an art in which the Horrors have become proficient. Their former incarnation as skinny clotheshorses has allowed them to evolve and run confident streaks across the record like a rainbow breaking out of a storm, spreading the primary colours of Loveless, Pyschocandy and In The Flat Field across their canvas. Pastiche with power, it's as easy as one-two-three: red, green, ... and as blue as White Lies.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Primary Colours, 22 Jun 2014
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This review is from: Primary Colours (Audio CD)
Very reminiscent of bands like The Cure, but with a recognizable sound of their own. I would give the album a 3.5 if possible
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4.0 out of 5 stars Very good but I expected more, 22 April 2014
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This review is from: Primary Colours (Audio CD)
This is a very good album but I was just very slightly disappointed- after reading rave reviews I expected more
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5.0 out of 5 stars A master peice, 10 Dec 2012
By 
Ke Donn "Dr Mac's hanky" (godalming, u.k) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Primary Colours (MP3 Download)
This is a fantastic album - thats all you need to know. Skying is also awesome as is Strange House
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Primary Colours [Re-Issue]
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