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4.1 out of 5 stars
Star Trek VII: Generations [Blu-ray] [1994]
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on 27 July 2013
as a trekie I only found this film ok I just wish Kirk had let himself look old as he should have
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 20 November 2000
Im not going to complain about the lack of extras on this disk, because they really do not matter. DVD does this film justice, it looks great, my only complaint is that some of the subtitles are wrong! But everything else is in order. You can not fail to like this film, no matter what genre you are into there is something in it for you. The cast have doen justice of introducing their characters to newcomers, and if you have never watched star trek before, im sure this will get you hooked! Im not going to tell you what the film was like, because when you buy it from Amazon and slip it into your machine, you will not be able to move. It really is that good. Just stop reading and add to your shopping list!
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on 2 June 2015
Great viewing lots of action an good story line...would recommend.
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on 7 February 2015
Brilliant film with old to new star trek members
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Star Trek Generations is the first of The Next Generation (TNG) movies and was quite a punt for Paramount, who were not sure the public would like the TNG characters in an expensive movie. The TV show was very successful but you never can tell. This lack of confidence can be seen in the decision to include three major characters from the earlier movies, Kirk, Scotty, and Chekov. This safety net would ensure fans of previous films would buy that all important ticket. Although set many years later Kirk plays a major role and is not just a name to put on the posters. I know your wondering how can that be, you'll just have to watch it I suppose.

Not being a TNG fan, I know I'm a just a tad biased, but I always found the new crew rather bland and boring. For me the relationships between Kirk, Spock and McCoy were always the linchpin of the show and films, it was never the stories; they made the stories work even if they were weak or badly written. This emotional triangle is missing from the new show and films.

Generations is not a bad movie, it's just not a good one, it`s OK but seen against earlier work it just doesn`t stand up. The best thing in it is Malcolm McDowell who is our bad guy. The new crew are OK in their rather bland way, but it must be said that it's when Kirk, Sulu and Scotty are on screen that the film comes to life, and feels like Star Trek. The special effects are first rate, especially the Stella Cartography sequence, but David Carson's direction is plodding and uninventive. It looks and feels like an extended edition of the TV show. That is probably because he was a show director, and seen as a safe pair of hands to get it done on time and more importantly within budget.

Generations can only be watched once and then filed, however Khan, Voyage, Motion Picture, and Undiscovered Country can stand multiple viewings. Diverting in its own way I suppose, but also rather forgettable as well. Don't' expect too much!
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on 13 April 2015
Received and meets requirement.
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on 13 May 2015
Another one for my collection
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 16 July 2000
All Star trek fans dreams comt true when Picard and Kirk, the two most famous Captains in Federation history join forces to save the galaxy (as per usual). Kirk was thought after being ð ed" savind the Enterprise-B and a madman called Soran, whose Klingon allies attack and kidnap LaForge from the Amargosa station. They also do irrepairable damage to the Enterprise-D, breaching the warp core. Although Riker, who was in command at the time, orders ship seperation, the explosion of the star drive section causes the saucer to crash on Veridian 3, where Picard is sucked into the Nexus. He eventually returns to reality after help from Guinan ( Whoopi Goldberg) and convinces Kirk to help him. They both return and Kirk sacrifices himself again to save others. Fortune smiles on the enterprise crew but not on the ship herself as she cannot be salvaged, questioning the future of Picard, Riker etal
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3 of 6 people found the following review helpful
Picard and Kirk together again for the first time? Malcolm McDowell as the villain? It sounds like a dream come true for Star Trek fans. Sadly, Star Trek Generations fails to live up to expectations and - as far as I'm concerned - should never have been made. That's not to say that it isn't a decent movie because it is (barely). What I object to is the somewhat desperate rewrite of Star Trek history and the cinematic death of Captain James T. Kirk. Kirk - and William Shatner - deserved much better than this. I think even Spock would have to shake his head and say what a ridiculous way to bid a final goodbye to the original and eternal Star Trek icon. The film has a number of other problems, as well, the sum of which adds up to this being the silliest film in franchise history.

We start out with Kirk, Scotty, and Chekhov joining the ceremonial voyage of a new U.S.S. Enterprise in 2293. Before the ship can return to dock, it receives a distress signal and, albeit reluctantly, rushes to the scene. The ship is ill-equipped to deal with any problem - many of its men and materiel have yet to arrive and it has the great misfortune of being commanded by some namby-pamby no-name who shouldn't have lasted a week at Starfleet Academy. This joker probably needs ten minutes to decide which shoe to tie first in the morning. It's up to Kirk to save the day, as always - but at great personal cost. Now we jump ahead seventy-eight years, where Picard and his Enterprise arrive at a solar observatory that has been attacked by Romulans. Among the survivors is Dr. Tolian Soren (Malcolm McDowell), a man with a dangerous agenda all his own - to return to the Neverland reality of the Nexus. Surprisingly enough, McDowell generates no sense of menace or even great importance, even when he's in the process of decimating entire worlds. Deanna Troi should have been able to take this guy out, but it turns out that only the dream team of Picard and Kirk has any chance of stopping him.

This story's subplots don't do the film any great favors, either - especially the one involving Data and his emotion chip. Remember how Spock kept cursing during Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home? Now that was funny. In Star Trek Generations, we get Data with his emotion chip installed, which turns him in to an incredibly annoying character who behaves like an immature teenager, cowers in fear like a little girl, and pretty much destroys any attempt for the viewer to take this film seriously. If you want character development - not that it's all that important in a movie based on a series that ran for seven years - you have to look solely to Picard, who must deal with tragedy and personal regret in the performance of his duties here. And what's up with the Enterprise? All I'm saying is that I would certainly like to run the company in charge of making new starships. I liked the hot Klingon chicks, and there's a nice moment involving Data at the end, but on the whole I find this to be the most forgettable of the Star Trek movies. As far as James T. Kirk is concerned, I just pretend like this movie never happened.
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3 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on 22 January 2009
I remember going to see this at the cinema filled with excitement, only to find myself leaving the cinema feeling rather depressed and empty. Generations definitely has a morose tone, which I guess is understandable given the themes and subject matter: the passing of time, death, bereavement and the desperate search for nirvana.

It's clearly a transition film and the whole plot is little more than a device to get Captains Kirk and Picard together. It's an entertaining ride, but the feeling of emptiness and mild disappointment still haunts me even after all this time. There are some intriguing ideas and themes, but the execution isn't all that great, as even the film's screenwriters freely admit in a surprisingly and refreshingly honest commentary.

The film meanders and often feels disjointed and rather than feeling organic, the plot often feels calculated and cobbled together just to accomodate the studio's mandate. Case in point: the destruction of the Enterprise seems tacked on just to add some excitement to a script in which excitement was otherwise lacking (Picard's desperate attempts to save some obscure planet just don't conjure up much tension - because, as harsh as it sounds, it's hard to care much about a planet and people we've never heard of, never seen and will never hear of or see ever again). The idea of the Nexus is an inspired one, but isn't quite executed with the finesse it deserves (we're lead to believe that Picard's idea of heaven is a Victorian Christmas surrounded by irritating children - wouldn't that more likely be his idea of hell given his long-established uncomfortability with kids?). The scenes between Kirk and Picard are disappointingly lacklustre, although to his credit William Shatner delivers one of his more charismatic performances and there are some odd moments of spark, even if it does ultimately fail to ignite. Kirk's eventual death is painfully lame (his final words, 'Oh my' seem pitifully lacking). The Data subplot seems totally out of place and miscalculated: given that Data was TNG's most popular character, why completely transform his personality for the big screen? As it happens, Brent Spiner hams it up something TERRIBLE and is exceptionally annoying as the 'emotional' Data (I point you to that dreadful laughter, the stupid jokes and the cringe-worthy 'life forms' song, as well as a propensity to swear and act like a moron).

That said, there are things to enjoy about Generations. It's visually stunning, with great special effects (the Nexus ribbon and the Enterprise crash are beautifully done), sumptuous cinematography (I particularly love the moody, atmospheric lighting), lovely location work and a superb, underrated score by Dennis McCarthy. Patrick Stewart is his usual brilliant self, Shatner is at his amiable best, Malcolm McDowell makes a memorably tragic villian, it's great to see James Doohan and Walter Koenig make welcome cameos and it's nice to see the Next Generation characters make their big screen debut (although as I said, in the case of Data I'd rather we'd had the 'real' Data and not the muppet he becomes the moment he installs that friggin emotion chip). It's a transition film, plain and simple - it could have been better done, but it could have been worse (and it would have been judging by the deleted scenes, had they not gone back and re-filmed the Christmas scene and the original 'climax' on the planet).
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