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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A great read that entertains with everyday examples
Malcolm Gladwell takes us on a journey through a vast range of human experiences (such as racism, dating, identifying genuine works of art, autism, police shooting the wrong man), exploring how our pre-programmed unconscious may be influencing us far more than we realize.

Blink is defined as "the content and origin of those instantaneous impressions and...
Published on 2 Jan 2007 by Tim Burness

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133 of 138 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting enough, but an expanded article rather than a book
Gladwell certainly writes well and entertainingly about an interesting subject - but as each new chapter started I began by thinking 'right, NOW we are going to have some advances, NOW the arguments are going to be explored and developed,' and basically, they never were. The book said what it had to say really within the first couple of chapters, with examples of where...
Published on 22 Feb 2007 by Lady Fancifull


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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Amazing but true, 24 Aug 2010
We all experience certain moments in our life that we deem totally unexplainable, this book has certainly helped me to make sense of them. I now understand that my gut instinct is my subconcious slicing information, which has been invaluable as a nurse. I now know why l follow my gut instinct, when everything appears to be going well and l get the heebie jeebies, and just know that something is not right. A Fabulous book, l recommend that everybody read it.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Not so good!, 22 Feb 2010
I much preferred Outliers by Malcolm Gladwell as it provoked some interesting analysis and thought. I found Blink tedious and repetitive as Gladwell seemed to struggle to find anything interesting to write about the theory he was putting forward.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Love it!, 15 Jan 2010
Malcolm Gladwell is a gifted communicator and researcher who never sounds trite or dull to my ears. He has an uncanny knack of making fresh critiques of popular culture that are deliciously absorbing.

The main premise of Blink is that there is "behind the locked" door of the mind an adaptive unconscious or 'independent' thinking-feeling entity always aware, in the moment, and can really only be genuinely discovered (it seems) through the channel of the Self, which is a rather mystical notion. For some mere mortals, the subconscious talks very loudly, such as George Soros (Speculator) who gets a pain in the back before an important change of financial position, or the example of a heroic Fire Officer who walked into a burning building with his men, and knew instinctively that something was wrong in just enough time before the room went up in flames.

For others access to this inner knowing is much harder to obtain, and for many still it is clouded in misjudgement. The fascination for me reading this book was how to make the intuitive science of Blink serve in making better decisions when it is of course not always that simple or obvious; further, if our relationship to inner knowing is such a personal one are there any objective clues or exercises that could assist towards a more intuitive approach to life?

In answering these questions I think Blink goes some way but, frustratingly and maybe teasingly, left me with more lines of investigation than I would have hoped for, which is not a criticism, just too much of a tall order!

One of the areas Gladwell explores is the idea of `thin slicing' or the ability of rapid cognition in a fraction of a moment. The basis for coup d'oeil (the power of the glance) is very much akin to a flickering flame; it is fragile, subtle and at the same time very powerful but can be easily snuffed out by external stresses, especially pressures of time and persuasion, as well as internal prejudices which have a subliminal component. One of the overriding conclusions is that a snap decision does not always equal clarity of insight, though they are easily confused. And more insidiously it seems our subconscious has a darker side - it is prone to the influence of powerful cultural discourses. For much of the legacy of politico-sociological and cultural media theory in the last 50 years, this last point is staple fare. Though in this case from a psychological point of view that might suggest there is some inner measurability for the human condition's sheep-like existence! Gladwell quotes the famous Harvard Implicit Test and other psychological experiments that reveal the very hidden extent of our more cynical motivations, extremely influential in the way we think and act..

In a similar vein Gladwell draws on current research into the mind that has a direct bearing on the topic of well-being. Psychological findings show that we subconsciously assess the mood of others as well as whether we are liked, which I guess is no big revelation. However the channels of communication that go about achieving this feat are not so obviously conscious and in order to unravel the mystery, researchers have employed a matrix of micro-body gestures for eliciting our true emotional states. Through careful and trained analysis (See the work of Silvan Tomkins and Paul Eckman) of a 30 minute video tape, for example, it can be shown that the body language of a couple discussing a contentious issue reveals whether their relationship will last longer than 15 years, with a 90% success rate.

Overall the book creates the impression that you can actually learn to be more aware, though without much of a self-help point plan. It instead offers a series of anecdotes backed up by psycho-sociological research that aims to breakdown the instinctive and seamless processes naturals seem to do in the blink of an eye. A very illuminating and enjoyable read.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A book to change the way you think ... all in the blink of an eye!, 7 Jan 2010
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If you are familiar with Malcolm Gladwell, he is a great author who breaks down the things we unconsciously do every day, and lets us know why.

Tipping point was his starter, and he has moved onto Blink, a book of anecdotes and tales about what we decide to do in the blink of an eye. His theory is that our brains and bodies intuitively know what to do, but that we seek further assurance before listening to that intuition, and, that we often miss out because of that delay.

It is an important point, and one we should all pay attention to, as we all often underestimate just how much experience we have in every day matters. Personally, I really enjoyed the tale of the card players, and if you do frequently play cards, this is a must read.

Even if you don't play cards, this book is for you if you are interested in what makes you tick, and if you want a distinct advantage over those who haven't read this. It's also a very entertaining read, so as Gladwell might say, don't delay, you know you want to buy this book!
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars The worst book of Gladwell, by far, 19 Nov 2009
After reading outliers and the tipping point I was eager to grab "Blink" but I was deeply disappointed with this one. I was fooled by the first chapter (not bad) but going through the book it gets more and more twisted

It didn't make much sense the whole book, not funny at all (unlike the previous ones), pretty boring in my point of view.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Absolutely fascinating, 8 Nov 2009
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I really enjoyed reading this book and found the examples and the discussions absolutely fascinating. I was a little concerned it was going to be a bit new-agey and self-help like (Improve Your Memory in Fust 12 Hours type thing) but it was actually very well researched and balanced. Gladwell introduces a number of examples and themes and gradually layers them and builds them up throughout the book, returning to previous examples and extending them, giving the book an interesting structure. The interviews with psychologists, scientists and other experts also makes this book more than just a Guru style guide. This book isn't going to change your life, but it is a very interesting read.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting Read, 27 Sep 2009
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Mrs. R. Shukla "Rinx" (UK) - See all my reviews
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Very interesting and gripping book .. Worth a read for anyone who likes to know about human nature ...
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 19 Sep 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
very nice!
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Unique Perspective!, 4 Nov 2007
I was riveted from start to finish. Gladwell reveals how we can become superior decision makers, in our homes, our workplaces, and in our daily lives. It's remarkable to realize that this book represents the life work of many brilliant researchers, most of whom we would never know except for this book. Gladwell has taken decades and volumes of highly technical research and made these concepts accessible to the average reader and anyone can see almost instantly how it applies to everyday situations we all encounter. I also highly recommend Understanding: Train of Thought.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great study on how our minds work, 4 Nov 2007
By 
Lynne Grey (United States) - See all my reviews
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This well-written book shows several studies that have been conducted on how we can, in a 'blink', make an accurate assessment of any situation. The catch, however, is that one must be knowledgeable about the situation at hand.

It also shows how we can be programmed into biases by those who know how to do such things.

This book is very insightful on just how our brains are wired to work. A very interesting subject.
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