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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A trip down memory lane
Got the book as a xmas pressie from my daughter. I lived in the same street as Michael Parkinson in Cudworth so much of the early part of the book was a definite trip down memory lane for me. Other reviewers have commented on the overload of cricket but as someone who knows nothing about the sport i didn't try to understand it from this book. What the cricket stories...
Published on 1 Jan 2009 by S. Johnson

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Great but could have been better.
Very well written and enjoyable. But found it a tad disappointing as it centred very much round his early days as a journalist and his relationship with his Dad, a Yorkshire cricket fanatic. But he brushes over life with Mary and the boys (in fact his youngest son barely gets a mention), also his infamous interviews with celebrities. I would have liked to hear much more...
Published on 19 Mar 2010 by Ms. P. G. Hadfield


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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Cracking read, 12 Oct 2011
Treat yourself to a cracking read. Humourous, sad at times, informative and hurray well written in good plain english.

Best bit, father in furs on a cruise ship.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent writing, 13 Sep 2011
If fans of Parky - and I'm one of them - were unaware that before his celebrated television show he was a reporter and journalist, they will be in no doubt as to his journalistic abilities after they've read this very well structured book.

Even though there may have been some of his guests who were not necessarily all of the viewers' cup of tea, it's easy to see why the vast majority of the celebrities queued up to appear on his show. Although it was styled `The Parkinson Show', Parky made it quite clear that he was merely compère to the programmes, drawing out the best (and on some occasions, the worst) from his guests; he certainly did not display the cringe-making, showboating antics of those who attempted to follow in his footsteps.

And this is reflected in his writing; he is able to brilliantly express the passion, the love and admiration that people, events and sports have played in his life; together with a very nice style of self-deprecation. In my opinion, this is a terrifically well-written book, displaying all the talents of an accomplished writer.

It also serves as a salutary lesson to those in the glittering spires of television who felt that we could do without Parky; in return, and as a consolation, they gave us Wossy.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The man who met everyone, 30 Aug 2011
By 
Chris White (United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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The Parkinson show holds a special place in my childhood, its eclectic but always entertaining mixture of guests enlivening many a 1970s Saturday night.

The programme's eponymous star has written an engrossing autobiography, which is informative, witty and revealing in equal measure. Up to the launch of his BBC career, Michael Parkinson describes his life in concise chapters. Thereafter, with many aspects of his subsequent success as a chat-show host to be discussed, he sensibly elects to give each their own section.

Therefore, rather like the original interviews in which they appeared, the major players are awarded the equivalent of solo spots. Having met around 2000 of the world's most famous people, their interlocutor can't mention them all but Parkinson has a damned good try.

I don't think I've ever read another book of this nature where the author has casually dropped so many well-known names into the narrative. Despite that, the reader also gains a frank insight into Parkinson's life away from the cameras: his love of his family, Yorkshire and cricket; the upbringing that instilled in him an unwavering sense of ambition. He doesn't hold back his opinions on the current state of broadcasting, reserving some carefully-aimed invective for trendy media professionals.

There are a few niggles. Parkinson's journalistic instincts are conveyed neatly through his economical prose. However, you'd think he'd be one to check his facts as there are one or two faulty recollections. In particular, he furthers the myth (in common with Eric Sykes' autobiography) that Tommy Cooper died on stage at the London Palladium. For the record, it happened during a show called Live from Her Majesty's.

That aside, there is a definite tale to be told of the working-class boy made good. Unlike so many of today's celebrities (and I use the term loosely), Parkinson has waited until the right time to tell his story and has crafted it with flair and honesty.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A good read, despite other reviews, 21 April 2011
By 
Rod (Scottish Borders) - See all my reviews
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One thing to say at the start. He's spent his life as a journalist, so he can string the words together, without the aid of a ghostwriter, and make the thing interesting

Like many folk of his generation, he started with very little, and faced "life down the pit." His parents helped him avoid that and he writes movingly about how (like many other parents of that generation) they went about doing that and (unlike some other parents) lived to enjoy his success

Some reviewers complain about too much cricket. But it formed an important part of his life and so it must feature here. In any event I didn't find it dominated the book

I was interested to find out what really happened about Meg Ryan and "that" interview. The answer is here

Parky is a guy I enjoyed watching because of his ability to ask the questions we would have wanted to ask. If we hadn't been tongue tied meeting someone you'd always admired. And then letting them get on and talk

Some have complained it doesn't dwell on the family. Surely many kids of the rich and famous prefer it that way, and why not?

An enjoyable read which explains much about how hard it is to get a tv programme to air these days
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Parky Delivers Again, 7 Jun 2010
By 
A. Byrne "Irish Reviewer" (Ireland) - See all my reviews
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Michael Parkinson, who entertained millions of TV viewers for many years with his talkshows, has delivered again with his autobiography.

The first mention of a TV interview comes almost half way through the book, which is good news for those interested in Michael's formative years. There are lots of interesting childhood reminiscences and stories from his early career as a journalist and a public relations officer in the British army.

Michael's talkshow career was launched by interviews with Orson Welles and Shirley McLaine. His success was grounded on his relaxed, respectful manner, which attracted big stars and then kept many of them coming back for more stimulating conversation with the son of a Yorkshire coal miner.

Depending on the reader's enthusiasm for cricket, there may be a few pages here and there where interest levels might wane. However, even those who don't like cricket will understand that Michael's love for the game was closely related to his love for his dad, who instilled a passion in him for the game.

A few skirmishes with his employers over the years are included, but these don't hold much entertainment value. However, they do illustrate that power plays can topple good people, just because they are good people.

The stories of his interviews with big stars largely carry the weight of popular interest. If there is any criticism, it is that there was scope for more anecdotes from those interviews. Perhaps that's for another book.

Well worth a read.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars can't put it down, 14 Nov 2009
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It usually takes me ages to read a book, but this one is so absorbing, i couldn't put it down. Michael Parkinson warts and all, his story is sad and funny and so real.....I absolutely love it.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A wonderful book, 15 Dec 2008
By 
J. Hill - See all my reviews
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Do not read this if you are only interested in Parkinson's chat show reminiscences, as many negative reviewers seem to be. Parkinson is not a one dimensional character. He has many interests and has worked in many fields during his long career. He writes about every aspect of his life with honesty and feeling. A wonderful read.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 5 Oct 2014
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Great
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Book Purchase, 29 Jan 2009
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I recently bought a book which was delivered in expected condition on time. Can't ask for better than that.
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2 of 8 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Huge Disappointment, 28 Mar 2009
By 
Spuddybuddy (Liverpool, England) - See all my reviews
Although well written, i felt really let down by this autobiography, Parkys obsession with cricket does him no favours. What an opportunity he missed, Parky has been lucky enough to meet some true legends in his time as our greatest interviewer, i'm sure he must have some really interesting stories to tell, unfortunately, he chose to make this more of a book on his love for cricket, i'm afraid it became a real bore to read and unless you're a real fan of the game, i'd give it a miss.
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Parky: My Autobiography by Michael Parkinson
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