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192 of 198 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A good read for winter nights
I have just finished this book, having spent the whole weekend reading. I just didn't want to put it down. This isn't a scary `hide under the bedcovers' sort of horrifying ghost story, so if you are hoping to be frightened on the run up to Halloween you will be disappointed. It is a story about a man who had a lonely childhood with parents who barely acknowledged his...
Published on 11 Oct 2009 by GT

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81 of 86 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Do You Believe in Ghosts?
Do you believe in ghosts? Yes, that age old question is asked once more in Kate Mosse's re-working of her recent Quick Reads release, The Cave, and if you've read that then I wouldn't recommend you read this as it is so similar.

The year is 1928 when Frederick Watson crashes his car in a snowstorm in the foothills of the Pyrenees. He thinks he hears a woman's...
Published on 5 Oct 2009 by Mrs. C. Colbert


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192 of 198 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A good read for winter nights, 11 Oct 2009
By 
GT (Cumbria UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Winter Ghosts (Hardcover)
I have just finished this book, having spent the whole weekend reading. I just didn't want to put it down. This isn't a scary `hide under the bedcovers' sort of horrifying ghost story, so if you are hoping to be frightened on the run up to Halloween you will be disappointed. It is a story about a man who had a lonely childhood with parents who barely acknowledged his existence and who lost the only person who cared about him. He struggles to come to terms with his brother death in WW1 and his guilt over not knowing how his brother died affected him even after many years. A change of scene and a trip through France is suggested. While driving through the mountains he crashes his car after becoming lost in a blizzard and finds shelter in village where he meets a lovely young woman who tells him her terrible story. Yes, you can pick holes in the story if you are really looking for them or you can curl up in front of the fire on a winter's night and enjoy a good book that is part ghost story, part love story and that has wonderful descriptions of the wintery French countryside.
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46 of 47 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Enthralling......, 15 Dec 2009
By 
Ms. B. A. Fisher (London, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Winter Ghosts (Hardcover)
Having bought both her previous books, and not knowing that an earlier, shorter version was available, I delved in, and wasn't disappointed! This is a stunning read. Her geographical descriptions are so accurate, having visited the area myself a couple of times, brings such authicity to this novel. Most people like a good old fashioned ghost story, but I found this much, much more. The haunting memories of a young lad who lost his only brother in The Great War brought home to me the period when loss was all, and everything else was hopeless. Meeting his ghost, Freddie is allowed to move through his trauma, and become a man with a future again. And, through his efforts and belief that he would find his beautiful Fabrissa once more, uncovers a tragedy long lost to man.
Stunning stuff, and quite enthralling; Thank you!
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81 of 86 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Do You Believe in Ghosts?, 5 Oct 2009
By 
Mrs. C. Colbert (Blackburn, Lancashire, UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Winter Ghosts (Hardcover)
Do you believe in ghosts? Yes, that age old question is asked once more in Kate Mosse's re-working of her recent Quick Reads release, The Cave, and if you've read that then I wouldn't recommend you read this as it is so similar.

The year is 1928 when Frederick Watson crashes his car in a snowstorm in the foothills of the Pyrenees. He thinks he hears a woman's voice: 'The Winter Ghosts'. He abandons his car and walks down the hillside path to the small village of Nulle, which seems to have a sadness hanging over it, and where he finds a friendly hostelry to spend the night.

He is invited to a yearly feast in the local Ostal where he meets the beautiful Fabrissa and tells her of his unhappiness at losing his brother in WWI. She too has a terrible tale to tell...........

This was an okay book, but it wasn't gripping enough for me, the characters were sympathetic without me caring too much about them, the storyline was a little predictable, it left me thinking "Is that it?" On the positive side, Kate Mosse's usual wonderful descriptions, especially of the snowy mountainside and deserted villages were a joy to read.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Beautiful Book, 17 Nov 2009
This review is from: The Winter Ghosts (Hardcover)
Kate Mosse has written five previous books including the huge bestsellers, Labyrinth and Sepulchre. I have only read Labyrinth but I really enjoyed it so I was very much looking forward to receiving and reading The Winter Ghosts.
People should be aware that this book is a lengthened version of The Quick Read that Kate Mosse has already published entitled The Cave. I have to say that the length was one of the only problems I had with this book. Whilst it was lovely to be able to fit this in over the weekend, I would also have liked it to have been a little longer as some parts of the book felt rushed. I enjoyed Kate Mosse's detailed descriptions in Labyrinth and I felt that The Winter Ghosts was lacking these in places.
We meet the main character Freddie Watson in 1928. He experiences a snow storm in the foot-hills of the Pyrenees and crashes his car. He has to seek refuge in an isolated village where he meets Fabrissa and over the course of one night they share stories of extreme loss and grief.
Freddie lost his older and only brother George in the First World War and he is still searching for answers. In Fabrissa he finally meets someone who can understand and share in the feelings that he has. However, the next day Freddie wakes from a dangerously high fever and nobody has heard of Fabrissa or the others that she had spoken of. Freddie sets out to find her as he promised the previous night and in doing so uncovers secrets that have been hidden for over six hundred years.
As the title suggest, this is a very Wintry read but don't expect a traditional ghost story, the books is extremely atmospheric and the reader has to make their own mind up about certain aspects. The Winter Ghosts explores grief and loss; I loved how Kate Mosse showed how these feelings are often the same, even when under different circumstances and six centuries apart. Mosse highlights the way in which war affects families and the fact that the consequences of war endure long after peace has resumed.
This book leaves you with an incredible feeling of hope and peace making it a very suitable book to read around Christmas time. If you haven't read anything by Kate Mosse then give it a go but don't miss out on her other books as they are excellent.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The spirit is willing but the tale is weak..., 15 Jun 2011
This review is from: The Winter Ghosts (Paperback)
The premise on the fly-leaf was interesting. It made me pick it up. A scan of the first few pages promised an interesting read...

In the event? It was a lacklustre, short and surprisingly insubstantial piece of fluff.

That the main protagonist resolutely failed to realise that he was embroiled in a ghostly tale was, frankly, bunkum and fast made me lose any sympathy. What a dullard.

The copius "Author's Notes" at the end, failed to give it the gravitas the author intended --or convince me that there was any substance to this rather dull, predictable and pedestrian "ghost story".

All in all, I expected better from a best-selling author.

Disappointing.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Winter Ghosts, 14 Mar 2010
This review is from: The Winter Ghosts (Hardcover)
I throughly enjoyed this book even though I had read the short earlier version The Cave last year. Excellent writer,I have to say I enjoyed the previous books more as the plots were more complicated, but this was a quick read.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars okay ..... but ...., 5 Jan 2010
By 
bookworm (Heath Charnock) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Winter Ghosts (Hardcover)
Not in the same calibre as Labyrinth or Sepulcre as it was fairly predictable and a 'lighter' read. That said, I had - mistakenly - previously read The Cave which is a shorter version of the story albeit with just a couple of name changes without knowing they were going to be one and the same story! it was only after both books came that i discovered The Cave was written for 'Emergent readers' - not something that was indicated on Amazon at the time!
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17 of 19 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars I can't believe how lazy this, 28 Dec 2010
This review is from: The Winter Ghosts (Paperback)
Having written an excellent book in Labyrinth, Kate Mosse now retreats into using up her additional source material in this book. If you think that this is a slim volume compared to Labyrinth, wait until you find out that the last forty pages are nothing but filling. This includes book club questions. I would like to add another question "what do you think a clearly talented writer is doing writing this? Do you think she's short of a bob or two". Probably more importantly I urge book clubs to avoid wasting their members' time with this.
She demonstrates a stunning ability to read a French road atlas of the Ariège département in the eastern Pyrenees; beyond that it is portentous rubbish.
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37 of 42 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Beware: publisher's deception, 29 Sep 2010
By 
This review is from: The Winter Ghosts (Hardcover)
Nowhere on the cover of this book or in the bibliographical info inside does it mention that this novel is a re-hash of THE CAVE, Mosse's 2009 "Quick Read" aimed at emergent readers. No, you have to get as far as p.251 where in a footnote to the Author's Note (!) you're told, "An earlier version of this story was published as THE CAVE...".

Is this legal? Even if it is, it certainly isn't fair to unsuspecting readers who might have shelled out 14.99 for the hardback. Not that I think potential readers of this novel are likely to have read THE CAVE, but unfortunately THE WINTER GHOSTS reads like a much-expanded short story, padded out with historical detail, indifferent black & white illustrations and ludicrously large print.

Shame on you, Orion. Surely Ms Mosse's large following deserved better than this?
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Charming and Gentle Tale, 21 May 2012
By 
Brett H "pentangle" (Brighton) - See all my reviews
(TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Winter Ghosts (Paperback)
The Winter Ghosts is a gentle and charming tale that has distinct echoes of Kate Mosse's other books, Labyrinthe and Sepulchre. However, unlike those lengthy works, this is not very long at all and is almost a short story. It is certainly possible to read it in one sitting.

The story takes place in 1928. Freddie who is still traumatised by the death of his brother, George, in the trenches, travels to the Pyrenees. Driving during a snow storm he has an accident and seeks refuge in the village of Nulle. He turns up on the evening of celebration of the annual Fete de St Etienne which has been taking place for hundreds of years. The events which take place there help him come to terms not only with George's death but also bring him into contact with a much earlier tragedy which occurred six hundred years before.

This tale is certainly not a cliff hanger, although there are elements of suspense. Neither is it one of those ghost stories where you feel that menace is lurking around every corner and no one could say that it is fast moving since it generally develops at quite a sedate pace. However, for all that The Winter Ghosts is very entertaining and enjoyable and I cannot imagine that many readers will abandon it part way through. It is one of those stories where one wants to know the outcome.
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The Winter Ghosts by Kate Mosse
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