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44 of 46 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This makes The Wasp Factory look like Pingu...
Anyone who has experienced an Iain Banks novel knows what kind of territory we are entering into long before those first few vital sentences grab us like the piercing jaws of hell; refusing to let us go until that final, writhing moment, when the clues (and the body count) add up, and the world of the story comes tumbling in on it's self in a spectacularly, jaw-dropping...
Published on 6 July 2004 by Jonathan James Romley

versus
1.0 out of 5 stars Dreadful torture Scene
How this descriptive writing can appeal beggars belief but the author is very skilled at it.and it might please some.
Published 9 months ago by kenneth derrick


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5.0 out of 5 stars Compelling Serial Killer story, with a really twist in the tale to really make you sit up and take notice, 4 Aug 2014
This review is from: Complicity (Paperback)
I have read all of Iain Banks' books and I read this book when it was first published in 1993.

This novel is perhaps the most predictable of Iain Banks novels since it is a tale a serial killer, and was published very much in the era of Silence of the Lambs.

Complicity tells two tales one of Cameron Colley, a journalist on a Scottish newspaper called The Caledonian, and in chasing after a 'scoop' finds himself drawn to strange locations all over Scotland.

The second story is of a number of horrific murders, and while I do not want to say much of the plot, inevitably these two tales wrap around each other like snakes and come to a common and unexpected conclusion.

This is a very good serial killer story and the murders are creative but never overly gruesome or horrific to read about. It has a really good twist in the tale which makes you go 'hah!' and really sit up and pay attention as to how the book resolves itself.

I have read it several times, and have always been compelled from the front cover to the back page, so highly recommended.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars good, but gruesome!, 4 Aug 2013
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This review is from: Complicity (Kindle Edition)
this was a really interesting book with a gripping storyline. the murder scenes were often a bit gross but i suppose that only adds to the suspense, so overall a brilliant read!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars love it - bit graphic mind, 30 July 2013
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This review is from: Complicity (Kindle Edition)
This is my second read by Banks and loved it. Could not put it down. Bit gruesome in parts but that's what makes the story . Absolutely love how he moves his story along - enjoyed this book right to the last page.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Are we mistaken? Did the wrong person get away? I'm not sure., 24 July 2013
By 
Chris Sullivan (Los Angeles) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I had never read an Iain Banks book before and this is the one I chose to read as an introduction to his work after I heard of his recent death. For some reason I thought this was a political thriller but the first chapter starts with a murder and it held me throughout; the chapter, that is.
It starts off - "You hear the car after an hour and a half. During that time you've been here in the darkness, sitting on the small telephone seat near the front door, waiting. You only moved once, after half an hour, when you went back through to the kitchen to check on the maid. She was still there, eyes white in the darkness. There was a strange, sharp smell in the air and you thought of cats, though you know he doesn't have cats. Then you realised the maid had pissed herself. You felt a moment of disgust, and then a little guilt."
That's right; he has the maid bound and gagged and he is waiting for the VIP of a man to come in to the house, in Belgravia, which he does. When he does, he hits him, ties his girl friend up, and puts her with the maid, then drags the VIP up the stairs and throws him out of the front window where he lands on some spike - one of which goes through the victim's eye socket.
Well that first chapter certainly grabbed my attention and it's a strange technique for a writer to, kind of, write to the killer as opposed writing in the first person or the third.
In the second chapter he does, indeed, write in the first person in the form of the narrator who turns out to be a boring, boozy journalist, Cameron, who is trying to find out what is happening in the nuclear industry somewhere in Scotland, somewhere away from Edinburgh, where most of the novel is set.
There is a mystery voice on the phone who sends him here, sends him there, as something is going on and it may be big; bigger than his other story about the whisky industry and what they are doing to the usquebaugh?
He also spends a lot of time playing on a 'game consul,' masturbating taking drugs or making love to a married women he knew at University. There is a guilt complex as he is very friendly with her husband from the same University and he kind of 'hero worships' his other friend Andy, whom he has known since they were both children and who has been away with the army fighting a war.
The strange thing about this story is that Iain Banks, himself, in real life (whatever that is) died of lung cancer; in this book (written in the 90s) it looks, but I don't think it gets confirmed, that Cameron - the me in the writing - has lung cancer and in Banks' last novel, The Quarry, the leading character has lung cancer; all written before Mister Banks knew of his own fate with the illness.
After the first murderous chapter, we are intermittently transported to other murder scenes; we are back to "you are doing this, you are doing that" - as there are, indeed, a few murders and the victims appear to be connected by the evil that men do.
It is well worth your time if you are looking for a 'good read' but there is a curious final chapter: now don't worry I won't spoil it for you.
At one point the police pick Cameron up and interrogate him; he seems to have been in the locale at the time of some of the murders so the cops think he knows something even if he doesn't know he knows!
When it is all over, and everything seems to have drawn to a conclusion, the narrator disappears; it doesn't go to the third person but to that strange technique of . . .. is it the fourth person? We are back to "you are doing this, you are doing that" - Are we mistaken? Did the wrong person get away? I'm not sure.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent on the Scots psyche, 25 April 2011
Being honest, I didn't expect to enjoy this book so no-one was more surprised than me when, once past the hundred page mark, I read the rest in one sitting.

Iain Banks's dark nineties characters are not my usual cup of tea and to begin with I felt a datedness to the story that seemed awkward. I am, however, well attuned to the Scottish psyche and this is something that Banks does so well that soon I no longer noticed or was even put off by the nineties backdrop - or the graphic violence and even more (porno)graphic exploits of our nineties protagonist, Cameron.

For anyone that struggles with this - the plot really kicks in at about page 150 and after this it all just flows effortlessly. I found that this book really engaged and challenged my mind - made think that I'd been reading little more than white bread sandwiches for months. Now what do I read next?
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars could not put it down, 15 Oct 2001
By A Customer
I read this book at secondary school and loved it. From the first few pages you will not be able to put it down, although the graphic images you'll imagine are to everyone's taste. The murders and the main character - Cameron, at first seem to be unconnected, but it does not take long before Cameron gets tangled up in the brutals murders. Another great book by Banks - i recommend you read some others as well.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Inspirational....!?, 12 Oct 2003
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This review is from: Complicity (Paperback)
A book that may disturb and inspire you. The plot is thick and the text rich. Guaranteed to get you biting your nails and maybe even rooting for the bad guy. Fantastic. If only characters like this really exhisted....(sigh).
If you like a bit of a mystery, some sex & violence with serious moral and ethical undertones then you'll LOVE this.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Complicit Read, 23 May 2003
By 
B. Kuehne - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I usually find it quite difficult to judge a novel that is very graphic as I can’t help but wonder whether the author merely gloried in its brutality and licentiousness; with ‘Complicity’ how-ever, that was never a question. From the very first moment we are complicit, taken on a ride we’re not really sure about where it is going to lead us, why we act as we do and whether we approve of it. Accompanied by a reporter whose bias is as obvious as his suppressive instinct and who seems equally appalled at the pandemonium he has been catapulted into, we both have to find out where we are heading. Cameron’s various addictions to legal and illegal drugs, his cynic articles, and his illicit affair are all faces of an agenda of pseudo-involvement that finds its counterbalance in the rampageous serial killer that seems (to Cameron’s misfor-tune also to the police) to have been invoked as an angel of vengeance by the journalist’s in-surgent articles. But as we are to learn everything has its root, and we ignore the past, as well as the future, at our peril.
‘Complicity’ is a brilliantly executed, gripping novel that serves as a great vantage point for an introduction into Banks’ literature and thinking. The applicability of the book’s moral question, rarely ever so poignantly put as in ‘Complicity’s two final chapters, makes the book a very interactive and enriching read.
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5.0 out of 5 stars complicity, 9 Jun 2014
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This review is from: Complicity (Paperback)
This completes my set of books by Iain Banks. Arrived very promptly and I look forward to getting stuck into it.
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1.0 out of 5 stars Dreadful torture Scene, 4 Mar 2014
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This review is from: Complicity (Kindle Edition)
How this descriptive writing can appeal beggars belief but the author is very skilled at it.and it might please some.
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Complicity
Complicity by Iain Banks
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