Customer Reviews


33 Reviews
5 star:
 (10)
4 star:
 (5)
3 star:
 (10)
2 star:
 (7)
1 star:
 (1)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


35 of 36 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Silly theme for a release, but fun
Okay, first off I'll get this out of the way: it's clear that the folk putting these DVD releases together knew that they were faced with three, well, let's say 'less popular' stories, and found a very tenuous link for a boxset to get them out of the way - the fact that they were all inspired by Greek myths (Atlantis, Jason and the Argonauts, Theseus and the Minotaur)...
Published on 29 Mar 2010 by P. Sanders

versus
66 of 68 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not the best of WHO, but enjoyable stuff despite itself
Three generally unloved DOCTOR WHO stories from three distinct eras of the show bundled together in a (very) loosely themed collection. Certainly these are not fan favourites, but there's still a lot of entertainment to be found here, not least because even below average DOCTOR WHO has a lot to enjoy if you're in the right mood for it.

THE TIME MONSTER from...
Published on 2 April 2010 by Emanon


Most Helpful First | Newest First

3.0 out of 5 stars The mediocrity box, 10 Aug 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Doctor Who - Myths And Legends Box Set: The Time Monster / Underworld / The Horns of Nimon [DVD] (DVD)
A forgettable Pertwee tale and two atrocities from the Tom Baker era (as I child, I almost stopped watching after The Horns of Nimon). They're nicely restored, though, and I did like Tom Baker's anecdote about Glenda Jackson's son - who grew up to be the political columnist Dan Hodges - on the Underworld commentary.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Mixed bag Who, 11 July 2012
This review is from: Doctor Who - Myths And Legends Box Set: The Time Monster / Underworld / The Horns of Nimon [DVD] (DVD)
This box set must be one of the worst mix up of Doctor Who ever. They are all so different.
Why can't we just have these as seperate DVDs? I am a big fan of The Time Monster with some beautiful costumes and fun story. It is an enjoyable Jon Pertwee show. The Horns Of Nimon, made over 8 years later is not one of Tom Bakers best, the acting is at times awful from the support cast, Lalla Ward is stunning in her riding pants however and she is the best actor as well in this lame Who show.
Undeworld is another late 1970s episode that isnt one of the best Baker episodes, Leela does her bit to put some fire into this lame story, its a shame these were put in a box so we have to pay a lot of money to get one good DVD.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Doctor Who and the link of spuriousness, 11 May 2010
By 
Paul Tapner (poole dorset england) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Doctor Who - Myths And Legends Box Set: The Time Monster / Underworld / The Horns of Nimon [DVD] (DVD)
As we get closer to gatting all old episodes of Doctor Who out on DVD, it becomes harder for 2entertain to find three stories that can go together in one box set.

So here we have three stories all bound together by the fact that they touch on old myths and legends. A somewhat spurious way of linking them together, but it gets three more out. And it's a good way to release three stories that have never been regarded as the best the show has to offer.

The Time Monster is a six part story starring Jon Pertwee as the Doctor, and sees him battling his arch enemy the Master, as the latter tries to control the power of a being from beyond time called the Kronove. The battle between the two time lords goes from present day Earth to ancient Atlantis. Full of interesting ideas but a bit too ambitious for it's own good the story has a tone that constantly teeters on the verge of getting a bit silly. If this had been a later Tom Baker tale that might have worked but it doesn't suit the earlier era quite as well. Although it's worth it for a typically excellent performance from Roger Delgado as the Master.

Underworld is a Tom Baker story and recasts the story of Jason and the Argonauts in space, as the Doctor and Leela meet a group of astronauts on a quest for a long lost item. Which is just coming to fruition. Finding a strange world where evil beings enslave their captives they all have a fight on to escape the danger that lurks in the tunnels.
Underworld was a victim of budget problems and had to be done with a lot of superimposition work instead of genuine sets. This isn't as big a problem as it might be. The problem with the story is that, after a good first part with an excellent cliffhanger, it goes nowhere fast. Nothing is explained very well and you're left with three episodes of dull people running around tunnels doing things for not much of a given reason. The supporting characters are all desperately underwritten and give the actors nothing to work with. Whilst there's a fun final scene that suggests the Doctor pops out of the TARDIS every so often to have an adventure when he gets bored, little of what comes before lives in the memory.

The Horns of Nimon is another Tom Baker story and sees his Doctor battling the Nimon, evil minotaur like aliens. Coming from a time when the show was accused of going over the top too often, Tom Baker isn't the main culprit this time. Graham Crowden as villainous humanoid Soldeed does that far more. But this isn't the Doctor's tale as much as Romana's. Wearing a striking costume and adopting a great take charge attitude she dominates the tale, which is quite fun if you don't take it too seriously. In which case you're clearly not a Doctor Who fan. But if you're in the mood for a light hearted romp, this is quite good entertainment.

All three discs have the usual features:

Subtitles: English

Language tracks: English

Audio Navigation.

Photo Gallery.

Production information subtitles.

Coming soon trailer for the next release in this range.

Radio times billings as PDF Files.

And a commentary from selected members of cast and crew.

The other extras are a bit thin on the ground:

The Time Monster has a short feature about the restoration of the picture for the DVD release. Technical but quite interesting.
And a twenty five minute long feature on the science presented in the story. Which is fascinating but a bit involved so you need to concentrate hard to get the most from it.

Underworld has an excellent and absorbing thirty minute long documentary about the making of the story and all that had to be done to get it to screen. And eighteen minutes of film of the story being made. This isn't just thrown at the viewer but presented in chronological order and with narration so you can tell what's going on. It's interesting viewing and worth it for the sight of Tom Baker in full flow.

The Horns of Nimon has a music demo that was recorded for the following season of the show, played over a few minutes from the story.
A seven minute long chat with the writer of the story about how the script was commissioned and what went into it. This is interesting viewing and just the right length.
And a thirty minute long documentary about the close relationship between Doctor Who and Blue Peter and how the latter show has promoted the former over the years. Featuring a few bits of footage that have been on other DVDS in this range, it's nonetheless entertaining viewing that should bring back a fair few memories. This just takes it up to the end of 1989, and there will be another part of this documentary to cover the more recent years on a later DVD release in this range.

For an easter egg watch the Horns of Nimon on a computer, go to the special features screen, and move the pointer over it till a hidden Doctor Who logo lights up. Click on that to see an odd little bit of Doctor Who related sock puppetry. Which you'll either love or hate, but it only lasts a minute so it's quick viewing.

The whole box set is probably for completists more than casual viewers, but there's enough decent moments in here to make it relatively worthwhile.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


26 of 38 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Time Monster in Context, 9 Feb 2010
By 
Paul Gasper (Sydney, Australia) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Doctor Who - Myths And Legends Box Set: The Time Monster / Underworld / The Horns of Nimon [DVD] (DVD)
Having read all the bagging reviews that these 3 episodes have been getting, I feel something needs to be said in defence of the Time Monster episodes. I speak as someone who saw the episode when it was first broadcast.
You have to put this story in context:
This was during that awful time when the Time Lords had banished the Doctor to Earth, and we were watching week after week of Earth bound stories dominated by UNIT soldiers and the men of HAVOC doing weekly stunts. The TARDIS had practically disappeared into the background, with not a roundel to be seen. We were starved for flights into the Space Time Vortex, and as for watching that rotor going up and down, well it wasn't happenning.
We were stuck with 70's fashions on Earth, and the TARDIS couldn't take us away from it to other worlds! To those of us who loved the "other worlds" side of Doctor Who it was getting really boring.
Then came the Time Monster. The faithful TARDIS gets carried across the countryside on the back of a truck, attacked by a doodlebug and knights in armour, and finally, by linking to the Master's Tardis, it takes off!
We get the Tardis landing inside the Tardis landing inside the Tardis (this infinite regression is used again and again in the series - but this was the first time). We finally get out of the 70's and into another time (even if it is the lost city of Atlantis - and the Doctor's second visit - so it can't be all that lost). We get to see a change to the interior of the Tardis which was another big deal (there have been many changes since).
But to me it was the excitement of finally getting away from the 70's - as a bored teenager in Australia these flights of fantasy were what dreams were made of.
So please, don't criticise these stories by the standards of today's television, remember where they came from. I know I will purchase the set when released becuase I love the old Doctor Who almost as much as the new one. But especially becuase of Time Monster. I shall be counting down in anticipation.
5-0, 5-5, 6-0... Oh, sorry, that's counting up, but if you watch the episode that will make more sense.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Myths and Fag-ends, 1 July 2011
By 
P. Galey - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Doctor Who - Myths And Legends Box Set: The Time Monster / Underworld / The Horns of Nimon [DVD] (DVD)
Three unlovely stories boxed together, though at least with a better overarching theme than the desperate "Earth Story" set.

The Time Monster is fun early on, with a typically watchable performance from Roger Delgado and some endearingly silly dialogue for the supporting cast. After the dimensional shenanigans reach a peak in the fourth episode, though, the action shifts more to Atlantis, where we suddenly have to care about a new bunch of people that we know will be gone in a couple of episodes. Ingrid Pitt's bosom is entertaining, but that's about it. A story of bits and pieces, then, but aside from the silly flapping bird man, not as bad as sometimes claimed. Even the much-maligned TARDIS walls aren't that bad. The remaster is very good, as a brief feature demonstrates, but I found the main extra, which attempts to assess the validity of the pseudo-science behind The Time Monster, a bit superficial. I'm no expert, but even I've heard of Planck time - to dismiss the "between now and NOW!" stuff without even mentioning it seems a bit of a missed opportunity.

Underworld is my least favourite of the three. It takes a cracking good premise - that Gallifrey's early forays into shepherding younger races was so disastrous as to lead to their blanket ban on intervention - and almost completely wastes it on a bunch of uninteresting characters and situations. The famous reason everyone hates this story - the extreme use of what're nowadays called virtual sets when the money ran out - makes the story look a little odd in places, but the real faults lie in the lacklustre script and casting. However the production problems do provide the best documentary in the set, a thorough and interesting analysis of the pressures the team were under at that time.

The Horns of Nimon is rather the reverse, a script and cast fizzing with energy, hampered by lazy design and direction. Early on, the great team of Baker and Ward hold the interest. Later when they get split up they wisely give Ward the serious stuff to do, and she attacks it with a level of conviction Baker left behind two or three years before. He instead gets to give mouth-to-mouth to his robot dog, deadpan "that's very odd" after the TARDIS does a lot of cartoon noises and anticipate Davison's incarnation by playing cricket with planets. With a better design for the Nimon, better sets, and someone prepared to rein in Graham Crowden (possibly the most diabolical performance in Who, and that's saying something), this could have been one of the most fondly remembered serials of the era.

The extras here include the first part of "Who Peter", looking at the special relationship between the two shows. It's interesting and I love the footage of the original design-a-monster competition - and I'm one of those oiks who, growing up, considered Blue Peter a load of condescending middle-class tedium. Meanwhile, much as I love a lot of the Radiophonic Workshop scores of the eighties, Peter Howell's audition piece is enough to make you wonder why JN-T ever thought it would be a good idea.

Overall, then, a more entertaining set than the lowly positions of the three stories in various fan polls would suggest.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars "A mixed bag", 28 April 2010
This review is from: Doctor Who - Myths And Legends Box Set: The Time Monster / Underworld / The Horns of Nimon [DVD] (DVD)
Odd choice for a boxset, not linked by Doctors, characters but by a theme-the stories' roots in old legends. Time Monster is my favourite of the 3, don't get me wrong it's way way from a classic and unlike its fellows doesn't even have my favouriet Doctor in but in an indulgent mood, I find it undemanding fun. The concepts interstitial time (sort of gaps between moments in time)for example are good ones, and there are some great moments of charm for the Doctor & the master. The Doctor tells Jo that the difference between depression and joy can be how you view things and gets lovely moment with George Cormack's lovely Dallios. Delgado has great fun as the Master posing as a Cambridge Scientist (yes his Greek accent's dodgy and he drops it soon anyway!)& there's a great scene where Dallios makes him look like a small boy being told off.
It starts as a UNIT story before they get sidelined into running in slow motion or turning into babies but while they're present they get good stuff to do, The Brig provides the Doctor with an answer, Yates faces attacks from beyond time & Benton briefly outwits the Master.
Where the story falls a bit is it lacks the legs for 6 episodes and the budget bites it in the bum. The 1st manifestation of Time Monster Kronos is some poor guy in a white bird suit on a cabel and it looks pure Rentaghost!(*1). Then the Tardis is decorated in plastic bowls and Atlantis looks like a school play set!
fun all the same.

Underworld has a better script and story doing Jason & the Argonauts in Space, has great performances from Uncle Tom, Louise J and guest actor Alan Lake too. There's a great spaceship set and the infamous CSO'd cave set, superimposed and not actually there, really doesn't look that bad.
Generally the effects shots especially ships in flight are damn good for the time, although a woeful shot of the ship crashing into the planet's not yet solidified surface looks like a model landing in a bowl of soup!
Where this falls flat is just that. It is dull and never quite comes to life.

There's plenty of life in The Horns of Nimon which is enjoyable for all the wrong reasons. Your local Waitrose does not stock this much ham as Tom, guest actors Graham Crowden and Malcom Terris go on a mission straight over the top. To be fair poe-faced I doubt it would be watchable (the script in the main is so earnest) but as a golden turkey, it's the best fun since the Wild Women of Wongo or Plan Nine From Outer Space!

There are signs that near the end of Graham Williams' time the comedy excesses were getting out of hand. When the Tardis goes wrong there's a greatest hits package of kid's TV comedy sound effects and running from the enemy Tom says

"Unaccustomed as I am to public speaking may I state and let me make it perfectly clear I stand before you, desparate to find the exit!"

Funny but not really Who.

The Nimon are a woeful alien, Blue Peter makeover style masks, leotards they clump about like tranquilised Herman Munsters!

There are great commentaries, the late Barry Letts telling us where Time Monster misfired, and John Levene on much more enjoyable form than when he commented on Inferno. A Tommentary for Underworld shows how much Tom & Louise spark off each other now. Louise tells him "There's no censorship between your brain & mouth" and Tom confesses that he pretended at a convention Jon Pertwee was phoning him from hell (" I ignored my inner voice saying don't go there Tom!" He isn't on the Nimon commentary but Lalla Ward, Graham Crowden, Anthony Read & Janet Ellis are almost up to Tommentary standards, laughing at the OTT styles ("Tom loved that for once he wasn't the most OTT actor Graham"), discussing how they didn't go too far with it. Graham also explains why he never pursued the interest in him for the Doctor's role when Pertwee left.

"Between Now and Now" falls between 2 stools with making of material and discussing the science of Time Monster, uneven but fun. We see in a restoration featurette just how much work was needed and it's more than I expected.

"Into the Unknown" is a thoroughly absorbing look at the story of Underworld's script and the unique challenges of filming so much against CSO. More entertaining than the story itself and well supplemented by in studio footage of the filming (with a helpful subtitles).

"Who Peter" is the set's great treasure, exploring the link between 2 great BBC insitutions. many rare bits of Blue Peter footage are included-Caron Keating driving a giant Dalek shaped car and there are some great interviewees e.g. Peter Purves on how often BP linked him back to his old job. This is only Part 1 with a future disc to show part 2.

We have a quick look at the score for Nimon Peter Howell producdd as an audition piece and Anthony Read tells us of the script's genesis and where the production of Nimon went a bit wrong.

A good package but diehard fans only-not those who joined the show in recent years.

*1 Rentaghost was a legendary kids comedy of the 70's/80's where Ghosts become do it all handymen/odd job merchants. .
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


23 of 41 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Middling, 3 Dec 2009
By 
Soze (Plymouth, UK) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Doctor Who - Myths And Legends Box Set: The Time Monster / Underworld / The Horns of Nimon [DVD] (DVD)
Well, 3 of the most vilified stories in fandom here together in one boxset! On the plus side it gets 3 out of the way that few were much looking forward to ( `Nimons` has it`s fans but generally for the wrong reasons! ) and the completists amongst us don`t have to pay too much for them.

The Time Monster starts well but becomes a staggering bore half way through...similarly Underworld`s first episode is fairly interesting but it`s final 3 possibly the dullest in the show`s history ( not helped by some ridiculous CSO work ). Nimons does raise the bar but as said, only because it`s so bad it becomes fun to watch.

But hey, it`s more Pertwee, Tom and Lalla, not too expensive and I`m sure the extras will be of the usual high standard. So once it hits the sales I`ll still be picking it up!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Really enjoyed it, 8 July 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Doctor Who - Myths And Legends Box Set: The Time Monster / Underworld / The Horns of Nimon [DVD] (DVD)
As I am a fan of the first 7 Dr Who's anyway (I was born in 1961) and am trying to replace the first 7 Dr Who's on DVD, I don't mind getting "Underworld" and "The Horns of Nimon" along with the "Time Monster". I have got all of the Pertwee Stories apart from the "Five Doctors" which I shall be obtaining in the future!

I personally prefer the Dr Who stories format then to what they are now!

By the way, no complaints about the films at all!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 12 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars One to get at a lower price, 27 Mar 2010
By 
Spidernick (Fareham, Hants, UK) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Doctor Who - Myths And Legends Box Set: The Time Monster / Underworld / The Horns of Nimon [DVD] (DVD)
A caveat before I begin: this review is of the stories only and not the extras (as I haven't seen the latter), although my feeling is that the extras will be good.

As others have said this is a rather strange release and, like others, the cynic in me thinks that they're trying to slip three of the least popular stories out at once (why didn't they release the awful 'Time and the Rani' with the much better 'Mark of the Rani' though, if they're doing things like that?).

Pertwee is rather out of vogue these days (not a single story getting in the top 30 in the most recent poll of stories from the classic and new eras - a travesty to my mind, but I digress), but he was my Doctor and I have a soft spot for his era. Saying that, it wasn't all good and to my mind 'The Time Monster' is the worst Pertwee story after 'The Mutants'. It is, unusually for 'Doctor Who', rather boring. Normally the bad stories aren't liked because they're not very good, rather than sleep-inducing, so this story is something of an enigma (only 'The Sensorites' springs to mind as similar in this regard). Even the wonderful Roger Delgado as the Master cannot save it.

The other two stories are both from Graham Williams' tenure as producer, the final series of which (excluding 'City of Death') for me was the low point of the 'classic' series until Sylvester McCoy came along. 'Underworld' has a very tenuous link to mythology (with characters names being based on those from Greek legends) and at least Atlantis and the Minotaur are more obvious. 'Underworld' is fairly typical of stories at the lower end of Williams' time, whereas 'The Horns of Nimon' can claim to be the 'Plan 9 from Outer Space' of 'Doctor Who' as many people like it in a 'it's so bad it's good' kind of way. I don't hate it as much as I did when it first came out (I was so depressed by it at the time I stopped watching 'Doctor Who' for a while), but I cannot warm to it, I'm afraid.

Unlike 'Time and the Rani', which you couldn't pay me to watch again, I would like to get this collection at some stage (especially for the extras), just not at its current price. For new fans looking for their first introduction to the classic series, I would certainly not recommend these - try 'Inferno' for Pertwee and 'The Deadly Assassin' for Baker.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


20 of 43 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Eh???, 15 Nov 2009
By 
Mr. C. J. Iredale "juxtapose" (London Town) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Doctor Who - Myths And Legends Box Set: The Time Monster / Underworld / The Horns of Nimon [DVD] (DVD)
This is a really odd release; the stories, packaged together under the title of 'myths and legends' is a weird bit of marketing. That said the stories here go from the sublime to the ridiculous. Firstly, from 1972 is the Time Monster, with lots of UNIT, a crapy new TARDIS interior that warped in storage between series and was therefore not able to be used again (phew- looks like someone's washing up glues to the wall), some weird concepts (Time Ram anyone?) and Sargent Benton in the nuddy. Not seen as a brill tale, but its nice to have some Pertwee as opposed to the 80 rubbish that has been released.

Underworld is a very typical late 70s effort with little to make it memorable. Not one you will rush back to I think.

Horns of Nimon is a very laughable romp with chaps in platform boots and bulls head mask things stomping about and shouting in deep voices. Oh, and Janet Ellis in a pre Blue Peter performance. No location work (therefore lotsof corridors) and Graham Crowden being pantomimic. Still, makes one wonder what he would have been like as the 4th Doctor (was offered the role before Tom Baker said 'yes, get me off this sodding building site!'). Again, not a great tale, but some amusing moments.

A definite curate's egg of a release, but a fairly welcome on none the less.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Only search this product's reviews