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50 of 53 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars This is the book after the movie
Some wonderful books get made into films, and we despair at the quality; wailing about how much was left out and the lack of depth. Well, Chris Carter has bypassed the "write a brilliant book and hope it gets made into a film" nonsense and gone straight for a ready made film script and plot. It's all there; the blood, guts, and gore; some excrutiating dialogue - including...
Published on 4 Mar. 2013 by Vicci's Books

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars To Many Basic Editing Errors Spoilt It For Me
I packed this up 30% in. The story wasn't a bad one but the litany of errors wore me down in the end and I couldn't be doing with anymore of it.
Once again I have the Simon & Schuster mistake they NEVER, EVER address with their cover art not copying over to any devices in the e-format. It's only a little thing, I know, but I pay for cover art as well as interior...
Published 1 month ago by Lynda Kelly


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50 of 53 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars This is the book after the movie, 4 Mar. 2013
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This review is from: The Crucifix Killer (Paperback)
Some wonderful books get made into films, and we despair at the quality; wailing about how much was left out and the lack of depth. Well, Chris Carter has bypassed the "write a brilliant book and hope it gets made into a film" nonsense and gone straight for a ready made film script and plot. It's all there; the blood, guts, and gore; some excrutiating dialogue - including some classics such as, "Just make sure you get the bastard/sonofabitch/evil (something or other)" and various reworkings thereof; lots of beautiful people that have no character or depth who we don't care one jot about (I have read all the books and still cannot get a picture of what Hunter, Garcia, et al look like or experience any feelings towards them other than wondering if Hunter is how Chris Carter imagines himself); make sure at least one of the good guys gets badly hurt or killed and then end with good triumphing over evil and the killer getting caught.

And yet here I am giving it four stars and buying another one. Why? Because it's like eating a bag of Skittles.

Skittles have no nutritional quality whatsoever; they rot your teeth and play havoc with your waistline, but they flash with great colours, taste good, are easy to handle and digest, and are scoffed in ten minutes. You think you won't eat them again but then you see another bag...

Chris ends each chapter with a 'cliffhanger' and you just HAVE to turn the page to see what's next but more often than not he keeps you waiting, and you have to read more chapters to find out. In the meantime, three more cliff hangers have been set up and you are desperate to find the answers to those too! On it goes.

All the books are pure, unadulterated, addictive drivel; enjoyable light relief from the intellectual and clever things that we would like others to think that we read. They are the treat "as part of an otherwise healthy diet". And how many of us stick to that?!
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44 of 48 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Amazing police thriller!, 1 May 2011
By 
A. Douglas (UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 1000 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Crucifix Killer (Paperback)
In this book we meet Detective Robert Hunter who put away the Crucifix killer two years ago - or did he. At the time he wasn't convinced but the public needed a conviction. When a girl is found murdered in an abandoned cottage, Robert is called because the similiarities are too much to ignore! I found this a really gripping read and loved the characters. Robert is a loner who gets a new partner who happens to be quite witted and really takes no prisoners. They get on really well and Garcia's wife doesn't hate Robert which seems to happen in quite a few books these days. It isn't obvious until quite late in the book who the killer is and I was surprised when it was revealed. It's really well done and I didn't want to finish it. I was so gripped that I found myself reading the bit at the back which previews the next book!!
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Absolutely Brilliant!!!, 19 Oct. 2014
This review is from: The Crucifix Killer (Robert Hunter Book 1) (Kindle Edition)
This is a book that I really enjoyed reading. I found myself drawn into the story from the first gasp I let out in the first shocking chapter to the last "Oh My God" that I uttered in the very last pages. It is absolutely one of the best police procedural thrillers I have ever read.

Mr Carter has a very fertile imagination, especially where gruesome crime scenes are concerned. No murder is like the other and thanks to the author's descriptions, I found myself wincing more than once and feeling as though I was actually there in the same room with the victim. All characters and dialogues are also very realistic.

Ex child prodigy detective Robert Hunter (who is also a criminal profiler with a PhD) and his new rookie partner Carlos Garcia from the LAPD Robbery Homicide Division are called to a horrific murder scene. The victim is a young woman who was sadistically tortured and left to die a very slow, painful death. She is found in an abandoned cottage tied to two poles.

"He likes to watch them suffer, he wants to savor their pain."

A symbol has been carved on the victim's body. A shocked Hunter recognises the symbol as being that of a serial murderer known as the Crucifix Killer. But wait!! The Crucifix Killer was arrested and executed two years earlier after having murdered seven people. Is this a copycat killer? But the symbol was never made public to the media. No one knows about it. How could this be?

"Another phone call - another victim."

Then a second victim displaying the same symbol is found, murdered in an equally horrendous but different way. Hunter and Garcia are desperate to catch this monster. But with no clues it won't be easy. The killer knows well the business of killing and never leaves a trace. Hunter knows that the killer is out there lurking, watching and playing games with him.

The story left me guessing till the very end. Like Hunter and Garcia I was clueless. This shows the author's ability in weaving a brilliant plot. At the end I could see all puzzle pieces brought together and all of a sudden everything made sense.

I couldn't believe that this is Chris Carter's debut novel. To say that it's brilliant is an understatement and I am really glad to have discovered this author.The fact that I have already bought the next two books in the series shows how much I liked this thriller. Needless to say...Highly recommended!!!
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20 of 22 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Interesting, 26 Sept. 2011
This review is from: The Crucifix Killer (Paperback)
Someone at work lent me this book and pressed me to read it and, ever the obliging gent, I did so. I quite enjoyed it.
Other reviewers have covered the plot adequately, so I'll just mention it - American serial killer re-emerges after a period, showing that the man executed for the crimes wasn't the real eponymous murderer. Wizard detective Robert Hunter, who always knew that the executed man wasn't the Crucifix Killer, gets on the case and eventually nails the real culprit.
Hunter is a bit on the incredible (i.e. unbelievable) side as a character - a child prodigy who gets a Ph.D in forensic psychology so good that his thesis becomes a standard manual for the FBI, he elects not to become a Professor at Harvard (or something like it) but instead becomes a cop. A likely story - though, having said that, Gene Rodenberry gave up a career as an airline pilot to become a cop, and I recently read about another retired airline pilot who did the same - in his sixties! - so maybe the idea isn't so incredible after all.
The plot, though clever, didn't stop me guessing the identity of the killer about a quarter of the way into the book (I felt smugly vindicated when the killer's identity was revealed at the end), but there is a really good red-herring sub-plot that'll throw you right off the scent just when you least expect it.
So, a good read. I'm looking forward to reading the sequel - when my friend at work has finished it!
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Riveting, 7 April 2013
This review is from: The Crucifix Killer (Robert Hunter Book 1) (Kindle Edition)
Loved this book. I kept thinking "I'll just read one more chapter". Consequently, I finished it in two days. Looking forward to the next one.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars To Many Basic Editing Errors Spoilt It For Me, 11 Jun. 2015
By 
Lynda Kelly "Lynda" (Shipton Bellinger, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Crucifix Killer (Robert Hunter Book 1) (Kindle Edition)
I packed this up 30% in. The story wasn't a bad one but the litany of errors wore me down in the end and I couldn't be doing with anymore of it.
Once again I have the Simon & Schuster mistake they NEVER, EVER address with their cover art not copying over to any devices in the e-format. It's only a little thing, I know, but I pay for cover art as well as interior content !!
Words were dropped from sentences meaning I had to keep rereading them-like a/of, complimented was used when complemented should have been and sustained when he meant maintained as far as I could see. There were apostrophe mistakes (that other e-book staple) along with missing commas, too.
One line lost me completely-"it had been over three years ago and he hadn't made detective"....I didn't understand that at all in relation to the passage I was reading. This one as well-"Garcia had wondered how could someone that didn't seem intelligent had managed to evade the law for such a long time".....horrific use of the English language.
We then meet a guy who worked at the local mortuary. Then all of a sudden a paragraph gets thrown in with a whole long description of him which was related to absolutely nothing else on the page....really quite peculiar.
On page 124 I read this, "Let me go ese, I haven't done nothing" and I glazed over and switched off.
It had its amusing moments along with the blood and gore but to trawl through so many basic editing errors in one volume is pretty dire.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Grippingly Gruesome, 9 Jun. 2011
This review is from: The Crucifix Killer (Paperback)
I've been waiting for a writer to hold my attention for some time now. I love well written horror stories, but unfortunately they are now few and far between.

I actually read The Executioner first (bought from my local supermarket), and couldn't put it down. Imagine my surprise when I discovered that this was actually Chris Carter's second book. I got straight online and ordered The Crucifx Killer from Amazon.

I hoped it would be like The Executioner, and I wasn't disappointed.

A lot of people have called the book 'cliched' and poorly written, but in my estimation there is far worse out there. Most of the 'Detective' or Crime books are written in a similiar style nowadays, so I found it refreshing to read a book that didn't shy away from delivering some 'blood and guts' to the reader. The plot was constantly twisting and turning, and I felt myself continually asking 'are they the killer?'. It's not until the very end that you actually discover the truth, which some people seem to have found disappointing, but I wouldn't want to know the end of the book at the beginning....what's the point in reading it when you already know the answer?!

My only grumble comes from the proof reading. There are some silly typing errors that should have been picked up before publishing. However, this is not the writers fault and can be overlooked as the book is so fantastic.

I have another book to read now (from one of my favourite writers - Shaun Hutson), however I just don't think it will compare to The Crucifix Killer or The Executioner.

Come on Chris.....get writing!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Poorly written but saved by a decent story., 14 July 2014
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This review is from: The Crucifix Killer (Robert Hunter Book 1) (Kindle Edition)
I just about enjoyed this but be warned, the book has a lot of flaws. The characters are paper thin (most given about a paragraph of personality) and all of them are walking cliches. Each piece of the story is advanced not through sequences of thrilling action, or tense sections or even characters actually really doing anything, rather each time Carter wants the story to go further, the two main detectives just talk about it a lot. It's exposition overload and actually quite annoying. Also, I spotted a few typos and numerous grammatical errors, which surprised me, and though while hardly a deal breaker do take you out of the story from time to time. The way some of the dialogue plays out is also laughable and in no way representative of how actual people talk.

It is however saved by a decent storyline. The killer is, although not very original, quite interesting, and the motive is good. The murders are clever and quite nasty, and it all make sense, and this just about balances out the flaws. I'll read the next because I accidentally bought the fourth book without reading the first 3, but if his style is just characters standing around talking about things rather than actually doing things in the next book, I may cut my losses.

PS. Don't bother with the prequel. Carter pretty much dismisses the preppy, elegant Hunter character in it for a new, rough talking alcoholic one that shares a name and not much more with the prequel Hunter.
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars well worth a read, 15 Jun. 2012
This review is from: The Crucifix Killer (Paperback)
The crucifix killer is the first book I have read by Chris Carter, and I really enjoyed it. I won't go into the storyline as lots of other reviews have, but I think Chris Carver has done a great job writing the crucifix killer, as it was his first book. Chris Carter has written an easy to read crime thriller, one that has many twist and turns along the way. The characters were interesting, and well thought out, and it was interesting to learn more about profiling a serial killer. Gruesome in parts with well detailed forensics, red herrings to throw the reader off the scent, this book has all this and more. If you are looking for a good thriller, and not worried about the dialogue being perfect, this book maybe for you. I will certainly be reading Chris Carvers next two books The Executioner and The Night Stalker
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45 of 54 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars I'm only giving it one star for punctuation., 15 Jan. 2013
This review is from: The Crucifix Killer (Paperback)
A lot of heroes in American crime novels like to drink Scotch, and often they fail to capitalise it, which annoys me. If the Danes get a capital letter for their pastries, and the Welsh for their rarebits, I think the Scots should get one for their whisky. This book at least manages that.

Unfortunately, that's the best I can say about it. It's about two six foot four gorgeous male detectives. They both work out, and are really, really intelligent, but still trust their gut instincts and hair products. One is Hispanic and married, the other is Aryan and troubled, but women keep throwing themselves at him, which interferes with him being troubled. I can relate to this a bit; it's a right pain when you're trying to be troubled and gorgeous women keep throwing themselves at you.

However, I think detective Hunter is a bit of a willing victim as he's practically planning the wedding after bedding one woman whilst drunk. He can't remember picking her up, so offers her some money in case she's a prozzie, and they both laugh at the faux pas. That's actually one of the more believable scenes in the book and, whilst I can't claim to know as much about serial killers as the author, and wouldn't claim to know anything about women, I do suspect it's probably a bit rude offering a lass money in the morning.

Fortunately she's a gorgeous and highly intelligent woman who works at a university; most gorgeous university lecturers I know don't mind being mistaken for prostitutes...no, that's not going to work, is it?

There's a shouty captain who says things like "Goddammit, Hunter, I trusted your gut before but you just won't play by the rules" and a streetwise Black pimp with a heart of gold, who I suspect will be part of the series. Avoid like the plague.
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