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30 of 30 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A rivetting read from start to finish!
Fac 51 - The Hacienda - How Not To Run A Club - Peter Hook

The Hacienda - several things spring to mind when the name is mentioned - gangsters , guns, drugs, violence , acid house - we've heard it all before ..... Or have we?

Peter Hook, bass player in Joy Division / New Order and co-owner of the Hacienda candidly tells the story of Manchester's...
Published on 24 Sep 2009 by S. Smith

versus
2.0 out of 5 stars not so great
Disappointed really. I thought it reads like a bit of trashy ghost-written celeb memoir, which given such an interesting period and the fact that so many interesting creative personalities were swirling around it could have been much more. I found the style really irritating and fairly egotistical.
Published 6 months ago by mx43443


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30 of 30 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A rivetting read from start to finish!, 24 Sep 2009
By 
Fac 51 - The Hacienda - How Not To Run A Club - Peter Hook

The Hacienda - several things spring to mind when the name is mentioned - gangsters , guns, drugs, violence , acid house - we've heard it all before ..... Or have we?

Peter Hook, bass player in Joy Division / New Order and co-owner of the Hacienda candidly tells the story of Manchester's most iconic super club from its inception to its closure .

Hooky gives a unique insight into the heady days of club culture in Manchester. From the Ben Kelly design which went five times over budget, to police interference ,monotonous weekly management meetings and the financial nightmare that the Hacienda became. As if we wouldn't expect any less, Hooky writes the book in his typical trademark tongue in cheek fashion. Hooky's direct, tell it as it is, approach grips the reader from the start to finish. While it becomes clear throughout the book that none of those involved had any idea of how to run a successful club or bar, the excitement felt at being involved in the ever evolving music scene is evident through Hooky's enthusiastic descriptions and anecdotes.

A chapter is devoted to each year the Hacienda was open and includes 16 illustrated pictures of the Hacienda inside and out, posters, flyers and even a rare picture of the enigma, Alan Erasmus. The "What's On" section from each year lists the events that took place every month and will take many people back and jog memories for the ones who had forgotten they were there! Excerpts from the company accounts and committee meetings are also provided for each year, illustrating the costs involved and the difficulties faced financially.

This story is not just Hooky's story, but also the story of the many other people involved in The Hacienda, The Dry Bar and Factory records and how these initially separate enterprises became inextricably linked. We learn not only how the relationships of those involved developed over the years but how the careers of renowned club dj's were launched, such as Hacienda pot collector Laurent Garnier, John Dasilva and Mike Pickering.

In 1997 the doors to the country's most famous club closed forever, but the memory, for those who lived through the highs and lows lives on in this book ,in this story, Hooky's story.

This a great read and highly recommended, not only for the true New Order/ Peter Hook fan but for anyone with an interest in the rise and fall of the Hacienda and the evolvement of the British music and club scene of the 1980's and 1990's.

Steve Smith

[...]
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Peter Hook's memoir, 30 Oct 2009
By 
David F. Lindsey (York) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
An excellent new view on an already familiar tale. Tony Wilson has given his perspective.
Now Hooky gives us a warts and all run through of the 14 years that most of the money
made by New Order was ploughed into the black hole which was the Hacienda. Essential reading
for all prospective club owners and historians of modern Manchester. He had a lot of fun
but it cost him. Well written and full of anecdotes which I had never heard before.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars How Not To Run A Club - But How To Write A Book, 21 April 2010
By 
Markus Buss (Germany) - See all my reviews
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I've never been to the Hacienda - not even been to Manchester.
Anayway, as a long time German New Order fan, I took a great deal of interest in everything, the band was doing.
I always was more a Barney fan than a Hooky follower - but... "How Not To Run A Club" changed that quite a bit.
Hooky tells the story of the Hacienda from his point of view: He tells the ups and downs and even more downs and the many maistakes and misfortunes the Hac and especially New Order and he himself were involved in.
The writig is funnny and ironic, written from a knowing and distant perspective. The story Hooky tells is exciting and funny, sometimes sad. I would have prefered more New Order insider stories - the Ibiza interlude and its Rock'n Roll anecdotes are very entertaining - but well, its all about the club, isn't it? "How Not To Run A Club" is a book about idealism, friendship and loyalty, loss and things falling apart - and, after all, music and lust for life.
The playlists and pictures give more information abou the Hacs unique history and make me even more regret that I've never been there.
Highly recommended!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A very good read, 4 Dec 2009
By 
G. Roxon (Barcelona) - See all my reviews
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Startlingly honest, takes you right into the seedy, sweaty, smoke filled, drug fueled heart of the Hacienda. Made me wish that I had had the balls to go there when I was a daft lad.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Quality Read, 13 Mar 2010
By 
Mr. C. R. Mccroray "dj_reboot" (Manchester) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This book is excellent and you can tell that Peter has put his heart into writing it. A very honest account of what went on at the hac including the gansters, the drugs, money wasting exploits etc.

Some of the stories made me laugh out loud and also made me scratch my head.
Do your self a favour and get this book. You will love it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Thoroughly enjoyable, and a little shocking, 28 Jan 2010
By 
Peter Lee (Manchester ,United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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Although I've lived and worked in and around Manchester for all my life and was born at the start of the 1970s I never went to the Hacienda, and I only found out where it was after it closed. After reading the book I confess I felt glad that I never went to the Hac' after all as some of the stories told here are certainly eye-openers.

This is a thoroughly enjoyable read. From start to finish I found myself laughing, tutting, and shaking my head in dismay as it becomes clear that the management didn't have a clue about how to run a night club. From money being kept in a filing cabinet as the combination for the safe was changed so frequently it was often forgotten, to indoor fireworks setting the night's takings alight, it's basically one long catastrophe, and I could only wonder how on earth the place kept going for so long. The answer, it transpires, was that almost all of the profit made by the likes of New Order releasing an album or going on tour was ploughed into the club.

One nice touch is that as each chapter closes Hook includes a listing of who had played at the Hacienda during that year (each chapter covers a year) and some feature a balance sheet, so you can see just how spectacularly the club was spiralling into debt.

It's unusual for a book to tell the story of disastrous management leading to financial ruin and be hugely entertaining, but this succeeds brilliantly. Granted, it may not be the best-written book in the world, and sometimes it talks of gangsters taking over the club in a curiously affectionate way, but I loved it. Oh, and the final revelation is just great :-)
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant Read, 9 Nov 2009
By 
A. Abraham (uk) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
A great read, funny and eye opening, especially if you were a hardened Hac goer. Some excellent funny stories mixed in with memory jogging observations and facts.
Even if you had never been, it's worth a read just to see how crazy people can be. Unbelievable antics and incredulous financial control but as the book says that's why it was what it was.
Brilliant!
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Viking of Whitworth Street, 8 Oct 2009
By 
Colin Mccartney (United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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"The Hacienda: How Not to Run a Club" is a tale of underground music descending into criminal underworld. I always thought the members of New Order exaggerated their claims of the Hacienda having been a millstone around their necks. It seems I was wrong.

The story: Rob Gretton (the late New Order manager) takes Peter Hook and assorted Hacienda staff on a 15 year long quixotic escapade. Sex and drugs and acid house and all that. What is surprising is, if Hooky was as trolleyed as he claims to have been, how he actually remembered all this in so much detail.

Funny and shocking in equal parts, the book paints an unexpectedly objective, though negative, picture but without ever resorting to bitterness (commendably). Barney Sumner is sparingly, though respectfully referred to. Stephen Morris and Gillian Gilbert, on the other hand, are barely mentioned at all. Towards the end, as Hook recounts how the magic died, it all gets rather depressing. Thankfully there's no shortage of amusing anecdotes to lift the mood. My favourite is the Sham 69 one (good to know Hooky was a fan too!)

It's not perfect a perfect book - there are a few "Did I say that?" moments and at least one factual error caused, I would suggest, by sloppy editing as opposed to any lack of knowledge on the author's part.

But it doesn't matter. As Factory books go, this and 24 Hour Party People are in a league of their own. In fact you could base a screenplay on this.

So now that Tony and Hooky have both written great books - over to Bernard?
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Interesting Read, 2 Jan 2010
By 
Neil Holliday (Barcelona, Spain) - See all my reviews
From a personal point of view, my interest in the axis of this book faded from the beginning. I loved joy Division, enjoyed some of New Orders stuff and loathed the whole dance scene which followed (the House/Acid /Trance scene). Added to which, I've never been to Manchester, nor visited the Hacienda, so I was fairly neutral to say the least about this. It's therefore worth stating that the book is fascinating, leads nicely from one year to another, and paints a frank picture of the whole Madchester thing as seen from within. No excuses are offered, nor blame for the faliure of a club which could have made money as well as headlines.
If you listened to music or went to clubs from 1980 to 2000, you'll find it an interesting read, and to my mind a worthwhile one. Well worth getting.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Good buy, 24 Jun 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
The book was in very good condition, save for a tear in the dust cover, but it being a hardcover edition it didnt really matter much. Good packaging and fast delivery, so very recommended.
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