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116 of 126 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Abridged
Very enjoyable. However it should be noted that this is an abridged version. It dosen't tell you that in the details.
Published on 18 Mar 2005 by G. Palmer

versus
14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Agonising
This is a foetid mess of a book spewed by accident from the substandard brain of one Dan Brown. It is possible that the following review contains spoilers, although since the book has already been thoroughly spoiled in the writing process it's hard to see how I could make it worse.

Essentially, the lead character, Robert Langdon, is a symbolologist who is...
Published 8 months ago by Hedgehogbutty


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0 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The best book i ever read, 30 Dec 2007
By 
C. Butt (Sydney) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This is a fantastic book which is impossible to put down. Ten times better than the film, its impossible not to be obsessed with
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0 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Parisa's Review, 29 Aug 2005
By 
Parisa "Parisa" (Guisborough Cleveland) - See all my reviews
A fantastically written book which, for me, was impossible to put down! The book is a non-stop adventure and search for truth which has many twists and surprises.
Paticular chapters in the book have made me see religon in a different sense. Since reading the da vinci code (in 8 hours!!) I have seen a famous da vinci picture, which I have seen thousands of times previously, in a brand new light! This is an exceptionally written book and a fantastic thriller from start to finish!
Parisa Diba
14
England
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0 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Fastest Passed Thriller EVER, 1 Nov 2004
By A Customer
I read this book whilst on holiday, and to be honest it gripped me from the begining to end(of the holiday). It is an amazingly fast passed thriller with twists and turns everywhere, gripping you from the first page to last. It is writen in such away it is amazingly wity and interlectul. Whilst having slightly far-feteched and a very strong storyline, I honestly put the book down asking myself questions.
I reccomend this book to anyone willing to give a great book a go.
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0 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Good Read, couldn't put the book down!, 24 May 2005
By 
C. Harnett "welshcaroline" (Cardiff) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
A really good book, well written and each chapter just left you wanting to carry on reading more (it took me 24hrs to read!). The book was insightful and thought provoking. What is faith unless somethimes it is questioned. I beleive some other reviews here are harsh; Its key to remember that the book is classed as fictional and doesn't claim to be a lonely planet for Paris! Read this book and enjoy.
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6 of 28 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars rubbish, 11 Jan 2006
By A Customer
This review is from: The Da Vinci Code (Audio CD)
This has to be the dullest and most boring book ever, i'm glad that i listened to the tape rather than actually reading it though. This was supposed to be controvercial but i really dont see what all of the 'hoo-ha' was about. Mithras being the first messiah and Jesus being the second as in the book 'lucifer wars' now that was controvercial! Da-vinci code has Mary Magdelein as possibly being Jesus's wife (well so what?) and apart from a nonsensical conspiracy theory that's about it really.
After all the fanfare this was very dissapointing.
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4 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars brilliant and educational, 13 July 2004
By 
Mrs R J Clinch (Basingstoke, Hants United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
I really enjoyed this thriller whereby I learnt a lot about art and religion. It is worth checking out the official Dan Brown web-site, rumour is this will be made into a film. I have just finished his latest - "Deception Point" with different characters and plot but similar twists this time involving American politics, geology and aquamarine life! Everyone I know who has read Da Vinci Code has been impressed and acutally finished reading it as opposed to just taking up book shelf space. I also admire the way Brown guides readers to know the characters and what makes them tick.
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0 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Nonstop Scavenger Hunt, Chase Scene, 7 Jan 2008
By 
Laurel Whitehead (Seattle, WA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Museum curator Jacques Saunière is running for his life. In the Grand Gallery of the Louvre he rips a painting from the wall, an alarm goes off, bars clang down, sealing him in and away from his attacker, an albino named Silas, but the attacker shoots him through the bars, wounding him. Silas is after a centuries old secret and he offers to spare Saunière if he talks, Saunière lies, but the lie is a good one and the Albino believes him, then leaves him to die with a belly wound.

Jacques is desperate to pass his secret on, but only to his granddaughter, Sophie Neveu, a cryptographer with the DCPJ (Direction Centrale Police Judiciaire) the Judicial Police, the French equivalent of the FBI. So he uses his remaining few minutes to strip naked, then he draws a circle around himself with an ultraviolet pen and positions himself like DaVinci's most famous drawing, "The Vitruvian Man," knowing Sophie will see his body and figure out his first of many clues.

The Judicial Police summon Robert Langdon, a Harvard Professor of Religious Symbology, who is lecturing in Paris, to interpret the crime scene, but unknown to Langdon, they suspect him as he was supposed to meet with Saunière later that evening. Sophie gets Langdon away from the cops and thus begins a book long scavenger hunt, chase scene that you'll be telling your friends about for months to come.

I'm sitting here at my iBook trying to think of how best to describe Dan Brown's writing. It's fast, sure. Historically accurate, yes. Descriptive, without a doubt. But none of that really gets across what I'm trying to say. Maybe I can make a comparison, Dan Brown writes like a cross between a young Robert Ludlum on speed and a young Frederick Forsyth on steroids. There is a reason why this book is the worldwide, number one bestseller, and if you haven't read it yet, you should.

Reviewed by Captain Katie Osborne
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0 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The Da Vinci Code traps you with passion, 20 Mar 2006
The last page of The Da Vinci Code was read this morning and just when I was reading the last two line my wife opened the door and came in. “For a moment, he thought he heard a woman's voice... “ still resonates in my mind.
The book is entertaining and capable of keeping your interest alive until the “THE END” words. And I am sure that the author would be able to create a thrilling plot with completely different subjects. So, take it for what it is and you will not be disappointed; just avoid the mistake of approaching it as a treatise on secret societies and conspiracy. It is not.
On the other hand, this work of Dan Brown introduces you (in case it was your first approach to it) to a certain type of knowledge, namely to the initiatic knowledge. I mean that, by going through the book, you will receive some kind of understanding that goes beyond what it is written and that reveals something about you or about the world, and which will happen to you as a small epiphany. It may change you mind about something.
Now, in this sense the book is open to a possible danger: it could not allow the reader to discern the truths, the facts from the fiction, in the sense that one needs a great knowledge of the “occult” world to decide what to believe in relation to many topics touched by the novelist.
Fortunately, architecture, paintings, places, theories and people introduced in the DaVinci Code can be actually studied independently by the reader through books, travels and the fantastic world of internet.
As far as I am concerned, I shall say that it supported once more my conviction that imagination plays a serious part not only in the writing of the History, but in the History itself. The masses' beliefs and the individuals' beliefs do not need to be true to be at the source of a quest, or a revolution or a murder. To say it differently, the passion for your belief doesn't tell us anything about its truth. To the point that even the pure love of the truth can be misleading, when it blinds the searcher.
Unfortunately, nothing much happens without the energy created by our strongest beliefs. So the search for the grail is just that: the finding of that star within yourself, that will guide you, or will lose you. What I have just said doesn't reveal much about the plot, neither about the end of it.
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1 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Eye Opener, 14 April 2005
I'm glad I follow my friends' suggestion to read this book. It was a revelation for me :) The idea and statement forwarded in this book is the first for me. Although some people say that not all of the info is true but just the whole idea is provoking and plausible. I'm going to check them out on ther books. Well, you can not read the Bible (focus: New Testament) with the same light now.
Dan Brown has managed to bring the data and not just made it in boring essay but into a thriller and mystery.
Actually I want to give this book less than 5 because the main characters need to be worked up a bit because of their inconsistency response to problem at hand. Specially agent Sophie Neveu that I felt too slow at the beginning for a French CIA's agent but nearing the end, suddenly to self confident. If that was used to array the clue from Langdon, I think Mr.Brown could use another method than slowing her down.
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1 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Da vinci code, 28 Nov 2004
By 
matthew armeni (whetstone, leicester United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
Gripped me from the start and kept me on the edge all the way through. A fantastic read that I recommend to anyone who likes an adventure. He better be writing his next book!!
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