Customer Reviews


1,553 Reviews
5 star:
 (627)
4 star:
 (228)
3 star:
 (201)
2 star:
 (172)
1 star:
 (325)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


116 of 126 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Abridged
Very enjoyable. However it should be noted that this is an abridged version. It dosen't tell you that in the details.
Published on 18 Mar 2005 by G. Palmer

versus
15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Agonising
This is a foetid mess of a book spewed by accident from the substandard brain of one Dan Brown. It is possible that the following review contains spoilers, although since the book has already been thoroughly spoiled in the writing process it's hard to see how I could make it worse.

Essentially, the lead character, Robert Langdon, is a symbolologist who is...
Published 9 months ago by Hedgehogbutty


‹ Previous | 1 2156 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Agonising, 23 Mar 2014
This is a foetid mess of a book spewed by accident from the substandard brain of one Dan Brown. It is possible that the following review contains spoilers, although since the book has already been thoroughly spoiled in the writing process it's hard to see how I could make it worse.

Essentially, the lead character, Robert Langdon, is a symbolologist who is called in to investigate a peculiar murder in the Louvre. Symbolololology, incidentally, is I think one of those subjects they only teach at former polytechnics, like Klingon or horse studies.

Anyway, from this bloody beginning, Langdon is gradually drawn into a vast conspiracy which implicates the entire Catholic church but oddly involves no paedophelia whatsoever. Along the way he meets a Frenchwoman and a cripple who is English (and therefore evil). He also spends a great deal of time spaffing on about symbololololology, all of which finally comes to a head when the grand secret - that people have sex - is finally spilt.

Brown's prose is so apocalyptically awful that my eyelids nearly glued themselves shut in self-defence. You know the story behind The Diving Bell and the Butterfly, in which tragically-paralysed author Jean-Dominique Bauby was forced to blink out every letter as he dictated the manuscript? Well, Brown appears to have written Code in a similarly laborious manner, by banging his head against the keyboard for fourteen billion hours and then deleting anything he didn't recognise as a word while still concussed.

The characters, despite what is supposed to be a burgeoning romance between the leads, are as bland and uninteresting as a magnolia urinal. Particularly irritating for me was the man who is English (and therefore evil), who is so massively, unrealistically English (and therefore evil) that you start to wonder whether Brown knows that England is a real country, not some Atlantean Narniaverse full of overeducated, well-spoken people who live in castles and take tea far too seriously (and are evil). And how the hell is it possible for even a writer as dreadful as Brown to make a masochist albino hitman monk BORING?

The Da Vinci Code is a runny compost heap of a book, to be recommended only to people recovering from traumatic head injuries that have wiped out their critical faculties.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


116 of 126 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Abridged, 18 Mar 2005
By 
G. Palmer (Birmingham United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Da Vinci Code (Audio CD)
Very enjoyable. However it should be noted that this is an abridged version. It dosen't tell you that in the details.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A rough sketch rather than a masterpiece, 26 Dec 2004
By A Customer
I read this book on the recommendation of a couple of friends, where the wife thought it was a good airport novel and the husband loathed it so much he could not bring himself to finish it. I tend to agree with the wife: the Da Vinci code is something that will keep you busy on a plane or a train, particularly if it is a Friday evening flight and you are tired. The book will keep you awake, and you will want to finish it the same night, but at the same time you will not want to keep it for you library, so you can throw it away as soon as you arrive at destination. Basically the author strings together a series of interesting ideas and facts, but does not attempt to construct real characters- it feels like you are reading a film script- no introspection, unidimensional sterotyped characters (just one character sums it up: the English female librarian wearing a cardigan and speaking like Bertie Wooster's aunt), long factual speeches/lectures for the readers who did not take Art History at school (one such speech is in fact a reminescence of an Art History lecture given by the main character- how lame can you get??) and some gimmicks that remind you of the puzzles you used to do when you were a child.
Still, on the whole a pleasant way to spend a few hours. Would recommend it because it offers many leads for further reading. !
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Fact/fiction? I didn't really care. I just wanted to read!, 28 Feb 2005
By A Customer
The story: OK, after some grisly murders the main characters are thrust into a situation where they are desperately trying to work out the true meaning and the true location of the Holy Grail by decoding clues and "symbology" (that is apparently hidden almost everywhere in every day life). It takes them from Paris to London and back again. The Police are after them, the "bad-guys" are after them and "the Church" are most definitly involved too.
The basis of this Holy Grail novel is that the history of Jesus Christ's life was changed by "the Church" to suit their own means and the "real story" was kept hidden by a secret society made up of many well known and/or well respected people throughout history. The good-guys are trying to work out the secret ... the bad-guys don't want the secret revealed. It's fiction based on a fairly well known conspiracy theory .... that's all.
Not being from a religious upbringing but instead just being made aware that a lot of ideas/religions exist and we can make up our own minds about what we choose to believe and what we don't - I read this with an open mind.
To be honest, I took the "based on fact" statement at the beginning with a pinch of salt... the book is classed as "fiction" after all. If you read it as fiction but also understand that the theories behind it are real (note I say "theories"!!!) then I believe that you can enjoy this book the way it should be enjoyed.
It certainly had me quite intrigued most of the way (although I did work quite a few things out by myself). I wanted to find out who the bad-guy (Teacher) truly was and who was setting-up the lead characters, Sophie Neveu & Robert Langdon. Was Bezu Fache (the nasty French copper) really as bad as he appeared? Or maybe worse? Or was he just a stereotypical character?
Unlike some, it seems (based on their reviews), I wasn't trying to read too much into it. I just wanted to read a good story and I didn't care one way or the other how much was based on fact. So what if he got some minor facts wrong. Nobody's perfect.
Some of it is based on fact, certainly ... but most of it is probably loosely based on theories (yep, there's that word again - THEORIES!!!) but I doubt it's meant to be taken as the "gospel truth" (ironic choice of words!)
It may be called blasphemous. It may be called controversial. I call it a good bit of fiction that raises a few eyebrows and may just make the reader wonder whether it could all be real after all. I think it depends on your religious views. But, of course, I could be wrong.
I know what my own theory on this matter is... but I'm not telling!
After all is said and done... I liked it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Blockbuster? Yes, brilliant? Well...., 24 Jun 2007
By 
G. MARSHALL - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I missed the hype so read this book without any particular expectation. Some of the pseudo history gave my eyebrows exercise but I enjoyed it as an adventure yarn. However on a closer look I realised that the book is a bog standard story of the genre with a clever wee construction that has been spectacularly successful at the cash register. The story has the usual pieces, an unlikely hero who just happens to be honest, clever and handsome, and a beautiful woman he just happens to click with. They are drawn into a violent and mysterious event and are forced, in the face of unknown and multifarious enemy, to solve the mystery themselves. Naturally the blundering authorities have got the wrong end of the stick and are trying to pin the crime on our handsome and moral hero. It all comes out in the wash in the end, villain vanquished, hero and girl triumphant. Dan Brown's trick has been to hang a series of historical "factoids" on the plot to give it body and purpose, letting the reader in on apparently revelationary secrets from the past. Well done Mr Brown, but let's not take it seriously, it's fiction guys.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Mediocre, at best., 22 Sep 2013
I did not enjoy this at all. Whilst the plot is vaguely interesting; the characters are terrible, very transparent and just there to propel the story along, there was no depth to any of them, you don't feel any emotion towards the characters, and the only person I did feel any sort of sympathy towards is the villain! The writing is terrible, and there are Biblical and 'arty' facts are just thrown in there for the sake of sounding impressive. Please do not waste your time reading this.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fast paced but predictable, 28 Mar 2004
By 
Christine L (Berkshire, England) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
If I'd never read anything by Dan Brown before I would have been tempted to give this book 5 stars (despite his poetic licence when it comes to European geography and law). I did however read Angels and Demons first, and The Da Vinci Code follows the same pattern, making it a bit predictable at times.
I did enjoy the fast pace of the story and I found the subject matter incredibly interesting (enough to warrant hours of research on the Internet), but since it followed the same "recipe" as Angels and Demons it was obvious not only who the bad guys were, but also how it was going to end. I also have to admit to feeling that the neat and tidy ending was just a bit too far-fetched for me to swallow.
Nevertheless, it's a highly enjoyable book that, apart from entertaining you, makes you think about religion and your perception and acceptance of what you've been taught. From this point of view it's a masterpiece.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Stupendously terrible, 26 May 2014
By 
Mrs. K. A. Wheatley "katywheatley" (Leicester, UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I am reading this because it is one of the very few books on the BBC's recommended top 100 big reads that I haven't read, and I am very excited about actually finishing a list of must read books.

This is the only reason why I actually struggled all the way to the end of this book.

It was parlous. Poorly plotted with massive holes in it in terms of police procedures, time lines etc, the dialogue is execrable and the characters unutterably stupid. Given the fact that Sophie is supposed to be a crack cryptographer her failure to grasp even the simplest puzzle is astonishing, and the exposition required on every page for the plot to work is so ludicrous it reads more like a text book or a travel guide than a novel. The whole thing is a clunky, ridiculous,aggravating mess.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A nice read but doesn't leave anything, 16 Dec 2004
I finally gave in to all those telling me this was the best book ever written. Well, it isn't. It's just another crime fiction with a bit of religion/mythology/art information set in the scene. It holds your attension while you are reading it but it doesn't leave anything behind. Although I must say that I enjoyed the theological ideas represented, but that's just because of my intrest in mythology and religions. Other than that, it's just another crime fiction, a nice thing to pack while traveling or something, if you want an easy read.
The writing is tolerable, the characterization is poor; the characters are cliché and predictable.
But it is entertaining while reading it and easy to digest and then you can move on to forget all about it...
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars glorious junk, 13 Aug 2004
By 
Trev Hill (Telford, Shropshire United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
I enjoyed this book and part of the enjoyment was that it was so predictable and ultimately disposable. The story reads like a "how to write a sensational thriller"; intellectual hero, beautiful girl, crazy killer and, of course, a secret society.
Interestingly I read Brown's earlier book, "Angels and Demons" after I had read "Code". It is almost identical... in the first two pages someone is horribly murdered (by the crazed killer) and within five pages Langdon meets the victim's beautiful daughter. Glorious romp, very enjoyable and you don't feel bad about never seeing the book again when you leave it on the train or lend it to somebody.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2156 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Only search this product's reviews