Customer Reviews


19 Reviews
5 star:
 (10)
4 star:
 (7)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:
 (1)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


38 of 38 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A worthwhile read but with a few reservations
This is the third instalment in Pamela Aidan’s reworking of Pride & Prejudice from Darcy’s point of view and overall I’d say it was a great success. It’s impressive that she is able to extract so much information from Austen’s story and retell it in a fresh way. Also interesting that a woman is writing a man’s point of view –...
Published on 9 Jan. 2006 by Helen Hancox

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Not Bad
The Pamela Aidan books have fantastic reviews but they are just not my cup of tea - have read all three in the series but I prefer the Abigail Reynolds/Kara Louise "what if scenarios". I found all three books (apart from the last few chapters of the third novel) a bit dull, long winded and boring.
Published 14 months ago by Michelle Hall


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

38 of 38 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A worthwhile read but with a few reservations, 9 Jan. 2006
By 
Helen Hancox "Auntie Helen" (Essex, England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This is the third instalment in Pamela Aidan’s reworking of Pride & Prejudice from Darcy’s point of view and overall I’d say it was a great success. It’s impressive that she is able to extract so much information from Austen’s story and retell it in a fresh way. Also interesting that a woman is writing a man’s point of view – as a woman myself I can’t tell how realistic it is, but it seemed to ring true to me.
The additional characters that Aidan introduced in the previous two books appear again, particularly Lord Dyfed Brougham who is a well-rounded and interesting character. Perhaps his secret life is a bit unrealistic, as is the sub-plot about treason and the weird Sylvanie that rather spoiled Book 2: Duty And Desire for me, but if you gloss over those aspects and stick with the main story it’s an enjoyable read.
Despite being a much thicker book than the previous two volumes it doesn’t feel laboured and drawn out. In fact, I would level the small criticism that the end comes rather too soon – much time has been spent setting the scene and the betrothal seems to happen with less reflection than all the other events in the books so far.
There are a number of loose ends, having read this book, which leads me to suspect Aidan has more books in store. The loose ends are about her extra characters – the Dy/Georgiana semi-romance (will anything happen – when she is older, of course); the treasonous exploits of Lady Sylvanie and her band of Irish followers; Dy’s involvement in spying; Georgiana’s excessive religiosity and what this means for her. I suspect a book about Dy and Georgiana is at least on the cards and I, for one, will be buying it.
At certain times when reading the book I wondered whether Aidan had written it after seeing the BBC DVD adaptation of Pride & Prejudice. There were a number of small events in the TV series which seemed to be reflected here, such as Darcy trying to cure himself of his hurt at the rejection of his hand in marriage by Miss Bennet through fencing. I thought this worked very well into the story but it did serve to ground the story into those actors (good though they were); this would only really be the case for those who were very familiar with Austen’s original so were aware what was outside of that work but was both in the TV series and this book.
As in books 1 & 2, however, there are some unfortunate Americanisms that have crept in and should have been spotted by an editor. Autumn has become “fall”, people “inquire” rather than “enquire”, “insure” where it should be rendered “ensure”, the wretched appearance of “gotten” numerous times, “pled” instead of “pleaded”, “normalcy” rather than “normality” and Lady Catherine is moved to “write his Lordship” rather than to “write to his Lordship”. These American words and turns of phrase jar when read by an English person and are a disappointment when so many other period details are right. I was relieved, for example, that Mr Darcy spread jam on his toast rather than jelly, but because of the earlier Americanisms I found myself noticing this correct usage and once again it took me, however briefly, out of the story. A side note – although this is an American-published book by an American author, the spelling is generally English in words such as “favourite” or “endeavour”, which is a real relief! Still, the random appearance of comments about Americans/Bostonians was yet another annoyance for an English Regency reader – why does every single American Regency writer insist on mentioning America?
Overall I enjoyed the book although I think the initial promise of Book 1: An Assembly Such As This was not realised as much as I had hoped in the two further volumes, although this one is better than Book 2. All in all I am impressed by Aidan’s grasp of the story and her own slant on it, although I feel that she is most successful when sticking to Austen’s original plotlines and that those made anew for this story are less convincing. But still a good read and streets ahead of an awful lot of other Pride & Prejudice derivative fiction.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great new perspective on P & P - love it!, 1 Jun. 2007
By 
P. Burt "nailsea_belle" (Bristol, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I've read all three of the books in this series based on recommendations from other Pride and Prejudice fans, and would heartily recommend it if you've ever longed to see the events of the story through Mr Darcy's eyes.
I must admit to having approached this series with some trepidation, knowing that many so-called Jane Austen sequels, or versions of the original told from another perspective are complete rubbish, and offend the sensibilities of non-purists and purists alike. Have no such fears about this series, which is not a sequel, but rather the original P & P story told from Mr Darcy's point of view.
I began to read it with a jaundiced eye, expecting to find it riddled with Americanisms (the author is American)and unintentional comical slip-ups but found myself (mostly) pleasantly surprised. Ms Aidan has evidently done her historical research, and I found it in places a rollicking Regency romp, and at other times a sympathetic and moving analysis of Mr Darcy's feelings and motivations, all related in an absorbing style that keeps your attention throughout. To her credit Ms Aidan never completely departs from the true essence of JA's original characters, in fact she introduces some new, well-imagined characters of her own for Darcy to interact with. They inject some additional "oomph" to the story, prevent it being too "dry" and help to fill in some of the blanks in the original tale. I particularly liked the Shakespeare - quoting valet Fletcher, and especially the 'Scarlet Pimpernel - type' character of Dy Brougham who flits in and out of the narrative.
The latter deserves a book of his own!
Part II of the series is a bit of a romp in the second half of the book (suspend your disbelief, all you Janeites).Take it as it's meant to be - a pastiche of the popular Gothic romances of JA's time - it's a hoot! However,I did get a little concerned in the first half that Georgiana was starting to 'get religion' in a big way, and go all "worthy" on us (and desperately dull - yawn!) but fortunately, the religious references were kept mercifully brief and probably fitted in reasonably with the historical period in which the book is set. As someone else has already stated in the reviews of Book II, this bit was probably influenced by the author's own religious views. However, from an English reader point of view, it's a wee bit cringe-making - not the kind of thing a British writer would have included in a novel of this type, I think!
Even Jane Austen herself kept off the subject of religion - it's just not a British thing!! This is just a cultural difference between us and Americans, I suppose (aside from all the language differences!).
Part III does however get back on track of the original narrative. If I have any other criticism of the series, then it's one that will only be of notice or concern to UK readers - unfortunately, the author has used American spellings, and occasionally the odd bit of US vocabulary and grammar sneaks in, which I found a little jarring and distracting, and which I think spoils the "authenticity" of it a little. For example, she has an English character refer to the "fall" - (i.e "autumn" to us Brits) and another part in Book II where a few characters in one scene "dove" in all directions to avoid an incident (aargh! - it's "dived" in proper English!) There are also several other examples where she has been a little lazy in not getting it perfectly correct - Ms Aidan, get a UK proof reader to look at Vol.4 before you publish!! However, being realistic, I know mine to be a relatively minor grumble in the greater scheme of things, and no doubt her US readers(who probably make up the vast majority of her readership) notice nothing amiss; but I think they are still being rather shortchanged if the author is seriously trying to emulate Jane Austen in any kind of way!
Despite all this, I still think that overall it's a darn good read, and I thoroughly recommend all 3 books to you all.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Close Reading, 21 July 2006
As I concur with most comments by "Speedy Reader 2" I'd just like to add some further remarks:

* First and foremost, Ms Aidans books taught me to pay closer attention to the original text than I did before: The ways she lets Darcy react to Elizabeth catches nuances and undercurrents in E's dialogue that I had missed before. This holds especially true for Vol. 1.

* Using Darcy's point of view throughout is a nice touch; as an example, he never learns about Mr Collins's proposal to E.

* The fact that Aidan's books are fully centered on Darcy makes the grave and sometimes ponderous prose somewhat more understandable and palatable.

* It is a pity that the trilogy ends with a glaring mistake: the wedding of Darcy and Elizabeth - only. The '95 film from which Ms Aidan borrows so liberally has got it right; there is a double marriage - quoting from Austen: "Happy ... was the day on which Mrs Bennet got rid of her two most deserving daughters."

Nevertheless, all in all I can promise afficionades some pleasurable hours of reading.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The fascinating conclusion of a remarkable trilogy., 26 Aug. 2009
By 
J. Lesley "(Judy)" (United States) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
Even after admitting that the second book in this trilogy was not quite as strong and interesting for me as I would have hoped, I still maintain that the series as a whole is the best Pride and Prejudice re-telling I've read.

Pamela Aidan had so much material to work with in this third book and I thoroughly enjoyed her version of the events as told from Fitzwilliam Darcy's standpoint. The first time I read this series I was intrigued by the title of this, the final segment. It turns out that it is taken from a verse in the Bible: And now these three remain: faith, hope and love. But the greatest of these is love. I Corinthians 13:13

This book begins with the journey of Darcy and his cousin, Colonel Fitzwilliam, making their annual Easter pilgrimage to Rosings to look over the business interests of Lady Catherine de Bourgh. At this point Darcy has not had any interaction with Elizabeth Bennett since the Netherfield ball but she has been almost constantly on his mind. Ms. Aidan had Darcy engage in some rather unpleasant times during the second segment of this trilogy and I'm glad to say that is all behind him and he has returned to being more of the Darcy I like. There is a character written into this series which I really enjoyed, that of Darcy's University friend and rival Lord Dyfed Brougham. Dy, as he is referred to by Darcy, plays a very shadowy part in helping Darcy navigate the sinister happenings in "Duty and Desire" and once again appears in this book. Lord Brougham's interest in Georgiana is also a continuing theme throughout the three books and I sincerely wish that plot thread could have been continued - perhaps even in another book concentrating on Georgiana.

After the disaster of Darcy proposing marriage to Elizabeth this book really concentrates on the aspects of Darcy's personality which caused Elizabeth to turn his proposal down. His personality takes a long, realistic time to transition from a self-centered, selfish individual into the man Elizabeth could love. I especially appreciated all the details Ms. Aidan contrived to show how Darcy went about finding Wickham and Lydia and how much he sacrificed in order to solve their problems. With all of his actions being done to honor Elizabeth and the entire Bennett family. Gone was the Darcy who only thought about how every situation would reflect upon himself and his heritage. In that place was a man who had compassion, sympathy and love enough for others to want to make their lives easier. In order to help the Bennetts he was willing to put his personal animosity toward Wickham in the background. He saw what was the right thing to do and then he did it. Marvelous character depiction by Ms. Aidan.

I highly recommend these expansions of the Pride and Prejudice story. Even though I feel that Ms. Aidan fell slightly off the rails with the second book, I still love to put everything else aside and totally immerse myself in this trilogy to see these characters from different vantage points. Any reading list of Pride and Prejudice variations will not be complete without including "An Assembly Such As This", "Duty and Desire", and "These Three Remain".
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars originally written, 11 Nov. 2007
By 
Lilacstar (united kingdom) - See all my reviews
I was engrossed from start to finished with this trilogy. Aiden manages to bring a fresh set of eyes to a classic story and writes it in a way that keeps the reader interested. I enjoyed the sub-plots and thought it was quite a clever way of having Darcy 'save the day' through indirect use of his spy-friend Brougham. others may be disappointed since it deviates from Austen's way but we have to remember that Austen wrote from women's points of view and not the male perspective which would have been two completely different worlds anyway. i definitely recommend this book and series.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars A lasting favourite, 12 Feb. 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This is the first 'Jane Austen Fan Fiction' novel I ever read and to this day remains one of my absolute favourites.

I will get the teeny tiny negative out of the way before I begin my raptures... As with any work of literature, there are things that 'I might have done differently.' But let me be clear: this is not my book, I was not the one who spent so much care and time researching and writing it, and therefore it is not for me to dictate what ought or ought not to have been included. (Suffice to say as a rather pathetic and devout follower of anything culminating in a 'Darcy and Elizabeth Happy Ever After', the notion of 'contenders' will always sit ill with me. This is my problem and not the authors' - and in any case, by the end, my quibbles are irrelevant anyway!)

Now, onto the (high) praise:

This is a wonderful, wonderful trilogy. For anyone who ever wondered what on earth the enigmatic Darcy was thinking throughout his tortuous courtship with Elizabeth Bennet, READ THIS BOOK. Aiden holds true to Jane Austen's original character, without affording him a 'shyness' or 'misunderstood aspect' that is so often (and in my humble opinion, erroneously) apportioned to him in fan fiction works. She keeps him strong, austere, commanding and appealing throughout, whilst taking him - and those around him - on a wonderful journey of discovery and - importantly - *plausible* change.

I ended this trilogy even more 'in love' with Darcy that Austen had left me (no small feat) even though the story ends at the same point. I cannot recommend it highly enough. The first and third books are without doubt my favourites, though in terms of execution and imagination (if not in a 'purist' P&P sense), the second holds its own as well. The characters of Dy Brougham and Fletcher are simply inspired and Georgiana holds her own too.

Truly, to this day (though I discovered this work many years ago) one of my favourite books - jaff and non-naff alike - ever.

Thank you Pamela Aiden, for sharing it with us!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars A good ending to the trilogy but it ends too soon ..., 1 Jan. 2012
By 
Schneehase (Norfolk, UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This is the third in a trilogy which covers the entire action of Jane Austen's 'Pride & Prejudice' but entirely from Mr Darcy's viewpoint.
The author, Pamela Aiden, has very cleverly meshed together the original action (and some of the original dialogue) of 'P&P' and expanded them sideways to show what Darcy was thinking, feeling and doing both with and away from Elizabeth Bennet.
Aiden carefully creates a convincing story set in a Regency England that I'm sure Austen would have recognised - the characters, conversations, action and settings are all about as authentic as they can possibly be given that Aiden is writing a couple of hundred years later than Austen.
This novel picks up the story again from the point where Colonel Fitzwilliam and Darcy set off to Rosings to stay with their Aunt, Lady Catherine De Bourgh, not knowing that Elizabeth is also paying a visit to her recently married best friend, Charlotte. Charlotte's husband is Lady Catherine's Rector (and general toady!)and Darcy and Elizabeth are soon thrown very much back into each other's company.
Darcy doesn't know any of what transpired in Hertfordshire after he left with Bingley - he doesn't know about Wickham telling Elizabeth his sad story, he doesn't know that Jane Bennet is pining for Bingley - all Darcy knows is that the woman he's unexpectedly met again is the one he wants and he believes she is interested in him too.
This, of course, leads to the excrutiating proposal scene and then to the soul-scouring that Darcy suffers on his return to London.
The improvement to his character and disposition, that Elizabeth is stunned by when they meet again at Pemberley, is described by Aidan is great detail and it's very convincing. Darcy learns from his experience and becomes the man he'd believed he already was before Elizabeth took him down a few well deserved pegs.
My only gripe about this novel is that it ends too soon. Austen does give a few details of Elizabeth and Darcy's married life and the futures of her sisters as well at the end of 'P&P' and I was disappointed that Aiden chose to end this novel at the wedding service. I wasn't looking for bodice-ripping bedroom action, but a glimpse of Elizabeth and Darcy's married bliss, the joy of Georgiana at their marriage etc would have been very welcome indeed.
I recommend this book as one of the more intelligent and believable attempts to continue the story of 'P&P' and to give adicts like me another 'fix' of Austen's wonderful world and marvellous characters.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Simply Awesome!, 13 Jan. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This series is the best adaptation of Pride and Prejudice I've read, and I've read a few of them! It's a class above all the rest! And certainly classier than some of the smuttier continuations, especially Sharon Lathan's offerings.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars interesting piece, 18 July 2010
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I have read the first and third in this trilogy - not sure about getting number 2 as it seems to have deviated considerably from being an alternative P and P into the realms of political intrigue. There are enough of that in this book to make me feel that as I prefer to leave it til another day, as I originally bought the book for the P and P angle.
I like this book, especially with the direct involvement of Elizabeth and Darcy. I would take exception with the reviewer who thought the book did not end in the double wedding, as it does in my copy!! I would also query why the author chose to do a P and P parallel, as her ideas are such that it could easily have been modified to a stand alone trilogy - sometimes I felt she was constricted by the original confines of the novel.
It is not my favourite P and P companion - I like Mary Street's version, but all in all a good read.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Austen For Blokes, Episode 3 (spoilers in 2nd paragraph!), 22 Jan. 2009
By 
Mr. M. Gradwell (Lancashire, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Third in the series it tells the classic Jane Austen story of the book Pride And Prejudice from the perspective of the male lead character Fitzwilliam Darcy. All through the three books (totalling something like 4 times the length of the original) there's details of what life was like for an early 19th century gentleman. Lots of huntin' shootin' and fishin' with a bit of fencing thrown in. There's a lot of kickin' back and relaxin' letting the servants take the strain, ya don't even have to shave yourself. Whatta life:o).

Anyway this book concentrates more or less on what happens to Darcy when Elizabeth rudely turns him down after his first marriage proposal. How that blows his mind and he turns his back on his old snobbish ways and starts to see the world like he thinks Elizabeth does.

All in all a great holiday read. You need to book a good four weeks off though!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Only search this product's reviews