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83 of 89 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The book that tipped
In the Tipping Point Malcolm Gladwell provides an overview on the phenomenon of social epidemics, the underlying reasons that make things tip. The book is well researched with academic contributions entangled with interesting narrative that illustrates the theory. I would have rated the book five stars if not for two issues. Firstly, the book is almost totally lacks...
Published on 5 Feb 2006 by Niklas Kari

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92 of 98 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The Tipping Point
'The Tipping Point' is another entertaining, yet laboured book from Malcolm Gladwell. Like 'Blink' you get an interesting premise, explained very well at the beginning of the book, followed by 150 pages going over the same ground in greater depth. Once you've grasped the initial concept and had it proven with a few examples, you don't really need to go over it much...
Published on 1 May 2008 by Spider Monkey


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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Poorly read..., 2 Sep 2010
By 
The tipping point. An interesting concept - not one invented by Malcolm Gladwell, but one discussed and made famous in his book of the same name. Some of the ideas in the book are fascinating, some are just plain trite or incorrect. Correlation does not always imply causality, after all.

The book is definitely worth a read; the audiobook, however, is a let-down. The publishers have elected to allow the author to read the book for this audio recording - always a mistake. It's usually for reasons of ego on behalf of the author, and cheapness on behalf of the producers, since they don't have to pay actor rates for the reading. Gladwell's diction is atrocious; he mumbles, his modulation is all over the place, and his enunciation is terrible. Words like "college" and "message" are rendered as "cardge" and "mesh", for instance - a professional reader would have helped immensely in this regard.

So, in summary - read the book, skip the audiobook.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A book to make you think, 14 Feb 2009
By 
Claire Bedrock (Bath, UK) - See all my reviews
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This book was recommended to me and given I respect the person who recommended it I figured I'd give it a go.

It is very easy to read and broken down into fairly logical chapters. Whilst I felt there were flaws in a number of discussions points it did make me think and see a different view point. Maybe it is because I never got into Sesame Street but that chapter seemed looonnnngggg. I have been looking at my colleagues and seeing them as connectors, maverns or salesmen and have been questioning how to make my product more sticky!

All in all, you have to use your own interpretation when reading this book but it will make you think about some things you take for granted.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Absolutely fascinating and so readable ..., 3 Jan 2009
By 
Annabel Gaskell "gaskella2" (Nr Oxford, UK) - See all my reviews
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The Tipping Point by Malcolm Gladwell is an immensely readable analysis of what makes epidemics happen. However its not really about nasty diseases, although they do feature, but more about business and marketing. It is not just a social science book, but also a philosophy cum marketing primer for anyone trying to get something to take off. To me it seemed to boil down to two main things which may seem very straight-forward, but are immensely difficult in the detail and practice.

Firstly, you need to identify and get the right people involved to spread the word. Gladwell categorises these into three groups: Connectors - who know people especially across normal group boundaries; Mavens - who are gifted information collectors and distributors; and Salesmen - no more explanation needed there. Get one or two of them on board and your idea will begin reach enough of the right people. To illustrate this he uses Paul Revere's midnight ride to tell the people of New England that 'the English are coming'. Revere it turns out knew people and when he knocked on the right doors he was taken seriously. Revere's colleague who went in a different direction tried to do the same, he failed as he didn't have the same networking skills. This section was absolutely fascinating - I like the idea of being a Maven - sounds very grand.

Even more interesting was the second main premise - Stickiness. So you've got your idea or product out there, now how to make it stick and get staying power. Gladwell uses the landmark kids TV show Sesame Street as an example. The production team really worked on finding the right mix of puppets, humans, graphics etc to keep kids' attention and drum the literacy and teaching messages in in a positive way.

What was really fascinating here was looking at a kids TV show that came after Sesame Street - Blue's Clues! For anyone without recentish toddlers, it's a very simple show. Blue is a cartoon dog with a young human owner (Steve in the US version, Kevin in the UK). Each episode follows the same format - Blue sets Steve/Kevin a puzzling problem and gives him clues, they have a little adventure to find the clues, then he sits down in the 'Thinking Chair' summarises and works out the right answer. There are large thinking gaps all the way through to allow your toddler to join in. Then - the killer! You and I would probably call this cut-price television - but the Blue's Clues episodes are deliberately repeated to create that stickiness of information - yes you did read correctly - repetition really works, children get (or remember) the answers faster on the repeats! Meanwhile I used to get so frustrated watching the same episodes over and over again with my daughter when she was little and always wished that Kevin would change his shirt (consistency was part of the recipe). Now I know it's deliberate in this case, (but of course a lot of other non-educational programmes are just plain lazy).

There was much more to the book, but as you can tell, I really enjoyed it. Highly recommended.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good but a little repetitive in parts, 29 Dec 2008
I bought this book as it was recommended by a friend who said that it was full of some revolutionary ideas on viral marketing. However, I don't think they could have read it cover to cover and only really read about Hush Puppies becoming the latest fashion trend in the US. I did enjoy the book in parts and it certainly had some great anecdotes about how it is often the smallest things that can have the greatest effect on the success of a social project or marketing campaign. Such as how mending broken windows in New York and arresting everyone who committed an offence on their subway began to lead to drastic reduction in crime in the city. However, I found some of the chapters on Sesame Street and Blues Clues dragged on and laboured the point.

In brief the book is good, but some chapters are better than others. If you take the time to read it you will learn something about how the human mind can be tipped by the smallest detail.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic read, 5 Dec 2007
By 
Rebecca Sutherland (London) - See all my reviews
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I absolutely loved this book. So much time and attention and care has gone into the research and structure of this book.

Many books pick an idea which they sell to you in the first three pages, then continue to repeat the same message for another 300-600 pages to justify a book - not this case with the Tipping Point.

Malcolm explores many different trends and behaviours backed up with lots of credible research.

I couldn't put this book down and look forward to reading it again
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Provocative and enjoyable, 12 Feb 2001
By A Customer
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I agree with all the other positive reviews - this is a fascinating book about social trends and the spread of ideas. My only reservation is that I thought it dragged a bit in the middle - how much discussion of "Sesame Street" can a person take!
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19 of 30 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars High soporific value, 7 July 2009
By 
High soporific value
`The Tipping Point' is typical of many (most) non-fiction books that come out of America - verbose explanations of the simplest of topics. The premise of the book is interesting, but using so many pages to repeatedly explain the examples becomes boring in the extreme; I kept saying, sometimes out loud, "get on with it". Soporific value is high.
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4 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Good book...A great idea - now part of business vocabulary, 20 May 2007
By 
The phrase "The Tipping Point" has entered the business vocabulary. It is a great idea and this book is well written and very interesting - but even though it is a short book - it is overlong. The idea is explained in the first few chapters...and then it just repeats itself. A great book all the same.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 1 Aug 2014
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M. Protokova - See all my reviews
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quick delivery, as described
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5.0 out of 5 stars Great value!, 18 Aug 2014
Great Value! Thank you!
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