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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Book 3!
Yes Book 3 of what was said in the first two books of this series to be, a two book series! And this book was as enjoyable as the previous two. It has an excellent continuation of the plot that starts off very shortly after the end of Book 2, new twists to the tale are revealed and a whole new element introduced. It is abit less detailed than the other two books but still...
Published on 9 Aug 2002 by 8of5

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars The sequel that should never have been written
What do you do when you have written a really great two-book series full of galactic destruction and adventure? If you're John Vornholt, you churn out a third book as a sequel to them (granted, it may very well have been the publisher's idea, but he could always have said no). Genesis Wave: Book 3 is everything that the first two books weren't: boring, plodding, with bad...
Published on 11 Feb 2005 by David Roy


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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Book 3!, 9 Aug 2002
Yes Book 3 of what was said in the first two books of this series to be, a two book series! And this book was as enjoyable as the previous two. It has an excellent continuation of the plot that starts off very shortly after the end of Book 2, new twists to the tale are revealed and a whole new element introduced. It is abit less detailed than the other two books but still has an interesting story that kept me reading. I did miss the presence of the Leah Brahms character but new characters are introduced which are just as interesting and I found the continuation of Admiral Nechayev particulary good, she seems a much more interesting charactor in this book. I recommend this book, but you need to have read the first two to understand a few things in it. I can only hope there will be a book four, because from this and its predecessors I would definitely buy it. And will certainly be reading more books by Vornholt in the future.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars The sequel that should never have been written, 11 Feb 2005
By 
David Roy (Vancouver, BC) - See all my reviews
What do you do when you have written a really great two-book series full of galactic destruction and adventure? If you're John Vornholt, you churn out a third book as a sequel to them (granted, it may very well have been the publisher's idea, but he could always have said no). Genesis Wave: Book 3 is everything that the first two books weren't: boring, plodding, with bad characterization and large stretches where nothing interesting happens. It is not only entirely forgettable, but it's also inconsequential.
The Genesis threat has been neutralized with the help of the Romulans and almost the entirety of Starfleet. However, the problems are not over. While the cleanup begins, the Enterprise discovers that the Genesis Wave has weakened the boundaries between our universe and another one, allowing horrifying creatures to bridge the gap. A massive rip in space does not bode well for the Federation's survival, especially because this isn't the only rift out there. Meanwhile, on a backwater mining planet, a Bajoran Prylar (similar to a lower-level priest or monk) is given what turns out to be a portable Genesis device. Believing it to be the Orb of Life, he is determined to use it for the good of his people, no matter what the true consequences will be. Aided by a Ferengi, a few Bajorans, and an enigmatic Vulcan, this Prylar could very well cause a lot more suffering than he thinks he will cure. But will the Romulans kill anybody they have to in order to get a hold of this final device?
It's almost hard to begin, there is so much wrong with this. First, the characterization is way off. Weird romance passages abound (Vornholt seems to have been bitten by the Christie Golden bug, as he describes many characters as "stunning") and even when the romance angles are a bit more understandable, they are stilted an obvious. One of Crusher's patients falls in love with her, but Crusher is acting like a jealous fishwife because of the way Picard is acting with the Romulan commander on the other ship. Picard's actions are made clear later in the book, but Crusher's are never really explained. In all their years of working together, they have been attracted to each other, but she's never acted this way. This book takes place between Insurrection and Nemesis, and there's no hint in either one of these movies that would allow for Crusher to act like she does in this book. Troi and Riker aren't nearly as bad, but some of their scenes together really grated on my nerves as well. There are times where they don't act like the professionals they are. Even Vornholt's characters are not immune to this. The Romulan commander has a hold on Picard's emotions (I won't say how, for fear of spoiling) but, for some reason, she has a scene where she tells the sleeping Picard that she really loves him. It's never referred to again.
The rest of the book introduces characters that I, for the most part, cared nothing about. The book seems to be a showcase for a new series that never actually started, of "Genesis Warriors," or at least warriors who banded together to fight the Genesis threat. There's the Vulcan priestess, the Romulan who has a secret, the defected Romulan who is a Starfleet admiral's agent, a Ferengi, and a shape-shifter (not a Founder). Sounds like a super-hero team, in a way, even down to them having a strong leader who gives them missions in Admiral Nechayev. My first understanding was that Genesis Force would be their first (and last) adventure, but I recently discovered that Genesis Force takes place concurrently with this three-book series, so that's not true. Even so, it does look like the "premiere issue," even going so far as to really ignore the Enterprise crew for long periods at a time.
Then there's the completely unnecessary references to Vornholt's Gemworld TNG series of books. The characters (especially Troi) keep wondering if the rift is something similar to what happened on Gemworld. It's never definitively answered (and if so, I was so bored I missed it) and even if it was answered, it really had no bearing on the plot. If there's anything I hate more than the overuse of continuity, it's the overuse of *useless* continuity. Vornholt at least doesn't take large portions of the book to explain what happened on Gemworld, but he comes close. Another use of continuity I had to laugh at is what ends up being the Romulan plan (and I shall say no more in fear of spoilage).
Other strangeness abounds as well. The entire Picard plot thread, though clear to the reader before this happens, is revealed to the characters in about two sentences as soon as Nechayev boards the Enterprise in a completely anti-climactic moment that allows them to plan a commando mission on to the Romulan ship.
The best thing I can say about the book is that the atmosphere is pretty well done. The excavation of the lab on Lomar, where all of the dead and dying bodies taken over by the moss creatures in the previous books reside, is quite chilling and oppressive at times, mirroring exactly how it would feel to work in that environment.
Other than a few odd moments here and there (like Lomar), I had to really struggle with this book. It reads very quickly, just like the first two books do, but yet it's also a struggle to get through as you the plot gets more and more outlandish. The worst thing is that this book was *completely* unnecessary! The first two books were so good, but this one almost cheapens them. I say almost, because thankfully this book is not necessary for the enjoyment of those two. It can be completely ignored, and probably should be.
David Roy
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars not as good as the first two Genesis Wave books, 8 Aug 2002
The plot of the book has not much to do with the first two genesis wave books.
The plot involves an interspacial rift (from the next generation novel 'Gemworld') which was opened by the genesis waves. The Enterprise E and romulan vessels try to work out what the rifts are and how to close them.
Whilst a bajorn monk and his partners attempt to sell a portable genesis device to the highest bidder.
The moss aliens from the other books are not even in the novel except for the begining.
This would probarbly have worked better as a stand alone novel.
Only worth buying if you are major star trek fan and collect all the next generation novels.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Milking it for all its worth, 9 May 2003
The Genesis Wave Book 3 is a perfect example of why a series should stop on a high. Throughout the book i could not help but feel that the author was trying to stretching out an already stretched storyline. The book was filled with characters which were far from interesting, the storyline was kinda tacked on, and the whole Bajorin Monk with the Genesis Device just didnt appear to be much of a threat or source of excitement for the book. The crew of the Enterprise just did not feel real, with Data's actions feeling very artificial, as was Riker's. And the authors inablity to think of something original for the trouble originating from the Rifts means he takes ideas from one of his previous books - Gemworld.
The first book of the Genesis series was by far the best. The 2nd was slipping, the third on its backside and the fourth will be most likely and walking corpse.
Overall a very unsatisfying read. I for one will be avoiding the fourth book of the series, which is boldly going in circles.
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1.0 out of 5 stars After brilliance of parts 1 and 2, this is shockingly poor, 7 May 2003
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I really liked the first two books in this series. But this is simply awful. It hardly follows the storyline from the first two books, and should really have been a brand new story. The author concentrates on his brand new characters, but quite frankly, I really wasn't interested in them or their story. There is very little reference to the existing ST:TNG characters.
To sum up : very poor, very disappointing. Avoid it. And if book 4 is aimed at continuing the new characters (which I suspect it will), avoid that as well!
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2.0 out of 5 stars Not as good as part II, 5 July 2010
Poorly written with a whole new set of characters and basically a new story from those in book 2.
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