Customer Reviews

30
4.3 out of 5 stars
Twilight Eyes (Unabridged)
Format: Audio DownloadChange
Price:£14.60
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
on 14 August 2000
Slim Mackenzie can see through to the evil core of some of the humanity peopling the world with his twilight eyes. The truth is they really do not like humans and have a diabolical strategy to bring misery to real people and decimate as much as humanity as possible. Far as Slim is concerned, there are no choices - his only option is to fight fire with fire, but he is far outnumbered. On top of that, they begin to recognise him as the threat he is and will not let him carry on this crusade unchallenged....... If you can only read one book by Koontz in your life, make it this one. Even though it's a dated book, in comparison to say False Memory, Koontz seemed to be at the absolute peak of his imaginative and storytelling prowess as an author. This book is simply off-the-hook and a must read. No superlative language can truly do it justice. Wonderfully conceived plots and convincing characters people Koontz best book to date and that is saying a whole lot.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon 16 October 2010
This is not one of Koontz's best books, there are jarring cliches and technical failings throughout but that doesn't matter. Twilight Eyes is a nostalgic book, set in 1964, the year of Kennedy's death, and has a haunting melancholy for a lost time of certainties, a world beginning to fracture with the Bay of Pigs. Carl Stanfeuss is a 17 year old boy on the run, going by the name of Slim MacKenzie because he killed his Uncle Denton with an axe, believing he could see through his Uncle's skin and see inside another evil creature, that he calls goblins. He breaks into the Sombra Brothers Carnival at night looking for work, and encounters another goblin sabotaging the dodgems, he kills this creature but when he comes to dispose of it the creature is gone. He joins the carnival as a caller and falls in love with his boss, and finds he is not alone in seeing the creatures that pass for human. As the Carnival travels to the mountain town of Yontsdown Slim finds himself in a nightmare world where the figures of authority, police, judges, clergy, are goblins and that something terrible is being created.
I love this book because of its place in my own personal history, I read it as a teenager and it soothed the sorrow inside of me. I may not have been aware of goblins as such, but they can be read as a metaphor for the evil within humanity and its potential for horror, balanced against the courage of people who cannot just stand by and let even unkindness be the dominant force in the world, let alone terror and pain and fear. It set me on a hard but worthwhile path, that standing by is not an option, however tempting that may be.
22 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
on 8 July 2001
This story is superb. After reading several of his earlier books I was sure I knew what to expect, was I ever wrong! Fantastic plot, gripping, intense and unmissable. Read this and scare the hell out of yourself. Is your horrible neighbour a goblin? Read this and find out............
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
on 31 May 2001
I won't bang on about the plot, as that would spoil it, but if you like Koontz as I do, this is as good as it gets. It is imaginative, exciting, and very good at getting you to care for the people in the story, so much so that it is the one book that I long for him to write a sequel to, so I can find out what they are doing now. Five stars +++++
11 commentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 26 May 2015
I felt that this was a very difficult book to review, as Part 2 is written in a very different style to Part 1. I later found out that Twilight Eyes was originally published in a limited edition in 1985 called Land of Enchantment. Then Koontz expanded the story; wrote the second half and published it as Twilight Eyes in 1987. That the book was written in two time periods is very obvious. It is rather like two different books.

Part 1 was good. I liked the descriptions of the carnival and it’s inhabitants “The Carnies”. I liked the aura of mystery and the feeling that there was maybe something supernatural afoot. I liked the nocturnal clandestine forays into the unknown by the protagonist Slim to try and discover exactly what was going on and how to get rid of the ominous threat he perceived. However ’Goblins’ taking human form did seem a little fanciful, but I was willing to suspend disbelief in order to see how the story developed. (David Icke kept springing to mind….)

The characters were well developed too. Slim, although only 17 years old, seemed an intelligent, sensitive and well rounded character and well equipped to face whatever adversity the world threw at him. Rya’s character was similarly intriguing, her initial aloofness becomes apparent as the story and her relationship with Slim develops.

Then came Part 2 and the story took on a totally different feel and in my opinion took a downhill turn. It read more like an action movie, and totally lost the charm and intrigue that was so much a feature of the first part. The depth of the two main characters that he had so painstakingly built up in Part 1 was stripped away, and any interactions with each other read more like a lecture on the good and evils of mankind and the like.There are some parts where Koontz tries to marry part one and two together to create a coherent whole, but this never really works.

But having said all this, it is not a bad book by any means. Well, lets face it, is it written by the great Dean Koontz, but it is not one of his best. If you are a really ardent fan, then I suspect you can forgive it’s misgivings and enjoy it for what it is. I gave three stars. I really could have given it four if the second part had not let it down and stripped away most of the positive character development that worked so well in the first part.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
10 of 13 people found the following review helpful
on 23 February 2001
When I was reading this book, I had contradicting thoughts about it. Sometimes I was extremely impressed, sometimes deeply disappointed. To get the worst out of the way, let me state the disappointing factors first: Dean Koontz needs to read 'The 38 Most Common Fiction Writing Mistakes' and take a good look at the chapter labeled 'Don't Lecture Your Reader'! I cannot totally attack Koontz though, because sometimes the information he lingers on is important for the story, but for God's sake be brief because it disrupts the flow of events!
Now this book is about a gifted young man who can see the evil presence lurking beneath a human disguise. This evil is a physical being - not something of spiritual nature - 'goblins' as he calls them. He stalks them, kills them, and he can also see the misery that they had brought over the earth. Like in all of Dean's books, the story is enhanced by several very real, very compelling characters. And as usual, you'll love and admire the characters. You'll be surprised too, because things will be turned upside down quite a few times, which is what makes this book exciting.
I wouldn't say that it is particularly very scary. It is gripping, yes. Thrilling, yes. Even bizzarre. But not enough to classify it as horror. It can be slow at times, which is why it occured to me to give it 4 stars instead of 5, but the way it ended made it worthy of more than 5 stars. It takes a very emotional turn and suddenly you may find yourself so tuned in that time and place seize to exist. I was touched so deeply by this story, deeper than many of the other books I have read for him.
Dean is also a great thinker. In a way, he carries a message in this book that is close to saying that he wished he could blame all the misery in the world on the 'goblins'. That we, humans, cannot be entirely blamed on the destruction of our world... wishful thinking of course, but an idea on which he built this book.
11 commentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 30 May 2011
The is a fantastic read, fast paced and entralling. The story of a young man and his fight against a race of goblins that hide in human form, that only only he can see, so he thinks!
Set in the early 60's this story hasn't aged like some of his other early stories.
If you havent read any of Koontz's books yet, they this would be an excellent start.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 13 October 2006
'Twilight Eyes' is a mixed bag of a novel. On one hand it gives you a great central premise of a man called Slim Mackenzie who can see demons that pose in human form. In the other hand, it gives you far too much detail and a ridiculous subplot about how demons called Goblins where engineered as weapons by a race before humans.

By adding the poor origins subplot, Koontz has managed to turn good thrilling horror into the poorest kind of schlock sci-fi. Horror does not need a deep explanation for it to work - true evil does not need to be explained.

However, even with some major faults there is still some quality to this book. The action sequences, when they occur, are gripping and I liked the characters and the way that they were written. Perhaps Koontz needed to get a better editor during the 80s as this book was too long winded in parts only saved by the fast action in others.
11 commentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 24 February 2015
I've read a number of this author's books but this one just did not impress, it was as though it had been written by someone else. The style of writing seemed different, far too much unnecessary description, rather weak characters and a silly story...
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 16 January 2013
I read this many years ago and always remembered the story but forgot the name and author. When I found it again recently I had to have it so I could read it again. Dean Koontz at his best
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Questions? Get fast answers from reviewers

Please make sure that you've entered a valid question. You can edit your question or post anyway.
Please enter a question.

     
 
Customers who viewed this item also viewed


 
     

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.