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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another Home-Run for Beaton!
This latest installment of M.C. Beaton's Hamish MacBeth series our hero suffers, perseveres and triumphs in his usual hysterical fashion. Set against the backdrop of the Scottish Lochdub, Hamish's perils begin with a woeful toothache and a lonesome heart. Beaton has brought back our hero, the hated Blair, the lazy Anderson and all the quirks of a quiet Scottish village...
Published on 10 Jun 1998

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Nice light read for a wet Sunday
Always witty but could do with being twice as long with more twists. Beaton has a good insight to small Scottish communities as I live in one (incomer) I should know.
Published 13 months ago by J. Hellens


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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another Home-Run for Beaton!, 10 Jun 1998
By A Customer
This latest installment of M.C. Beaton's Hamish MacBeth series our hero suffers, perseveres and triumphs in his usual hysterical fashion. Set against the backdrop of the Scottish Lochdub, Hamish's perils begin with a woeful toothache and a lonesome heart. Beaton has brought back our hero, the hated Blair, the lazy Anderson and all the quirks of a quiet Scottish village. This time Hamish has a myriad of surprises to contend with. But he does it in rare fashion and without his beloved Priscilla! Always delightful, intriguing and easy to read, with Death of a Dentist Beaton has managed to combine humor, love and angst, thrills, spills and chills!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the best of a great series, 22 Sep 1997
By A Customer
Beaton has outdone herself in this latest of a marvelous series of Hamish Macbeth mysteries. Her characters leap off the page, the atmosphere is vivid, and her prose has reached new heights. I re-read the sentence about "Duty" about forty times. It belongs in Bartlett's. Irrespective of the plot, which is a good one, this is just a plain old-fashioned darn good read from end to end. Bravo!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Interesting characters and good story, 30 Jan 1998
By A Customer
MC Beaton has created a successful formula for writing detective stories. The main character, Hamish is lovable, the local life (rural Scotland) is interesting, and the murder, itself, is revealed in an interesting manner known as the police procedural. All the stories of this series are worth reading but they are a little too short, require a small dose of incredulity, and could use a little more development. MC Beaton writes to a formula for her MacBeth and Raison stories. The real mystery is who is MC Beaton--she has over 7 pseudonyms by my count.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Removal of a Malpracticing Skirt Chaser, 1 May 2007
By 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - See all my reviews
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M.C. Beaton specializes in finding a scoundrel to kill off. Many times the person isn't so much an evil-doer as an unpleasant person. Some of the stories aren't quite as strong because removal of the obnoxious isn't nearly as interesting as elimination of the truly bad apple.

Death of a Dentist contains one of M.C. Beaton's most detestable victims, Dr. Frederick Gilchrist. The not-so-good doctor is famous for pulling teeth which can be saved (which his impoverished patients don't see as such a drawback), destroying perfectly good teeth with a slip of the drill ("The Great Australian Trench), and taking advantage of any woman who attracts his attention.

Normally, Hamish Macbeth, Lochdubh's finest police constable, attends an excellent dentist in Inverness. But excruciating pain drives Hamish first to Dr. Brodie who diagnoses an abscess which requires antibiotics before any dentist will be able to help him. No sooner does Hamish return to the station, and he learns of a large robbery of cash from a not-so-safe (which has a wooden back rather than reinforced steel). By the next day, Hamish is back in great pain and decides to look in on Dr. Gilchrist in near-by Braikie (an inspired choice of a name) rather than driving all the way to Inverness. Arriving at the office, no one's there. Hamish discovers one very dead dentist.

As usual, everyone else wants the credit for finding the thief and the murderer. Hamish, however, thinks that he should locate both because the crimes are on his patch.

No one is willing to tell Hamish what Dr. Gilchrist was really like. Hamish keeps prodding until clues start to spill out about the doctor's fondness for the ladies . . . that the ladies usually don't want to say much about.

As Hamish checks out matters, it's clear that other false notes are being sounded. What else are people hiding?

In the middle of the muddle, a beautiful hiker appears who turns out to be a friend of Priscilla's. Hamish is immediately smitten, but Sarah Hudson seems more interested in Hamish as a friend than as a lover. But Sarah does have one Priscilla-like ability; she is soon helping Hamish investigate and unravel the riddles.

Soon, Hamish has fallen into a bigger mess than he realized, and Sarah's help becomes crucial.

Before the book is done, you'll find that three crimes need to be solved and many major and minor mysteries resolved.

The misdirection in Death of a Dentist is excellent, and the plot will delight those who like lots of action and challenge in their Hamish Macbeth stories.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Removal of a Malpracticing Skirt Chaser, 1 May 2007
By 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)   
M.C. Beaton specializes in finding a scoundrel to kill off. Many times the person isn't so much an evil-doer as an unpleasant person. Some of the stories aren't quite as strong because removal of the obnoxious isn't nearly as interesting as elimination of the truly bad apple.

Death of a Dentist contains one of M.C. Beaton's most detestable victims, Dr. Frederick Gilchrist. The not-so-good doctor is famous for pulling teeth which can be saved (which his impoverished patients don't see as such a drawback), destroying perfectly good teeth with a slip of the drill ("The Great Australian Trench), and taking advantage of any woman who attracts his attention.

Normally, Hamish Macbeth, Lochdubh's finest police constable, attends an excellent dentist in Inverness. But excruciating pain drives Hamish first to Dr. Brodie who diagnoses an abscess which requires antibiotics before any dentist will be able to help him. No sooner does Hamish return to the station, and he learns of a large robbery of cash from a not-so-safe (which has a wooden back rather than reinforced steel). By the next day, Hamish is back in great pain and decides to look in on Dr. Gilchrist in near-by Braikie (an inspired choice of a name) rather than driving all the way to Inverness. Arriving at the office, no one's there. Hamish discovers one very dead dentist.

As usual, everyone else wants the credit for finding the thief and the murderer. Hamish, however, thinks that he should locate both because the crimes are on his patch.

No one is willing to tell Hamish what Dr. Gilchrist was really like. Hamish keeps prodding until clues start to spill out about the doctor's fondness for the ladies . . . that the ladies usually don't want to say much about.

As Hamish checks out matters, it's clear that other false notes are being sounded. What else are people hiding?

In the middle of the muddle, a beautiful hiker appears who turns out to be a friend of Priscilla's. Hamish is immediately smitten, but Sarah Hudson seems more interested in Hamish as a friend than as a lover. But Sarah does have one Priscilla-like ability; she is soon helping Hamish investigate and unravel the riddles.

Soon, Hamish has fallen into a bigger mess than he realized, and Sarah's help becomes crucial.

Before the book is done, you'll find that three crimes need to be solved and many major and minor mysteries resolved.

The misdirection in Death of a Dentist is excellent, and the plot will delight those who like lots of action and challenge in their Hamish Macbeth stories.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars death of a dentist, 13 Dec 2009
By 
Mrs. D. Akllwright (Suffolk, England) - See all my reviews
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this book arrived in great condition and is yet another example of the wonderfully written tales of hamish macbeth by m c beaton, there is enough geographical detail to make the reader want to visit the area to see for themselves, but not so much that the book bogs down in descriptive stuff instead of whats happening in the life of this simple scottish copper. just love to follow the sequence of events in this mans life it makes for very entertaining reading , thoroughly recommend this book to all readers who want a bit of excitment without the blood and guts stuff that some many seem to find necessary in a detective story today, its well writtrn and presented and easy to follow so much so you dont want o put thr book down until you have finished it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars ANOTHER GREAT VILLAGE MYSTERY..., 6 Mar 2012
By 
Lawyeraau (Balmoral Castle) - See all my reviews
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When an agonizing toothache drives Constable Hamish Macbeth to the office of the local tooth extractor, Dr. Fredrick Gilchrist, who also has a roving eye for the local ladies, Hamish thinks he has prepared himself for the worst. Little does he know that his expectations will be exceeded when he arrives at Dr. Gilchrist's office. While Hamish had prepared himself to have a tooth pulled, he was not prepared to find the very dead body of Dr. Gilchrist.

As Hamish investigates the murder, it appears that suspects abound, as Dr. Gilchrist was certainly no angel. While investigating the murder, Hamish comes up against a number of other crimes, keeping his hands full. As always, his hands are somewhat tied by the boss we all love to hate, Detective Chief Inspector Blair. Still, Hamish prevails, finding his way through the myriad of twists and turns his investigations takes.

This is the thirteenth book in a series of cozy mysteries featuring lovable Highlander, Hamish Macbeth, the constable for the sleepy village of Lochdubh in northern Scotland. In this book, the quirky village characters beguile the reader, giving the book its cozy feel. The book is laced with sly humor throughout that is engaging, keeping the mood of the book light and highly enjoyable. One does not read these books for their literary value. One reads them purely for the fun of it.

As with all cozy mysteries, it is not so much the mystery that is of import but the characters that revolve around the mystery. While the mysteries are intriguing, they are the framework around which the characters evolve. In the endearing character of Hamish Macbeth, the author has created a sure fire winner, who has won over the many fans of the cozy mystery genre.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars HAMISH'S WAY, 10 July 2011
By 
Mr. D. L. Rees "LEE DAVID" (DORSET) - See all my reviews
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Dentist Frederick Gilchrist, notorious for pulling both women and teeth, is found dead in his surgery - every tooth drilled. Aided this time by Priscilla's friend Sarah, Hamish Macbeth investigates....

Like its predecessors, this thirteenth adventure is set in a part of Scotland the writer seems to know well - one that is sadly witnessing so many changes for the worse. Despite sombre undercurrents, much entertains. As ever, skilfully drawn characters abound - many of them delightfully bizarre (as with wily old "seer" Angus Macdonald), others distinctly horrible (especially the hairy, troll-like brothers Smiley). Hamish himself remains vulnerable and most appealing - he here to suffer toothache, heartache and a close brush with death. Unorthodox methods allow him to unearth clues and evidence undiscovered by his "superiors" - he as usual happy for them to take the credit, so he may go back to enjoying a quiet life.

Another gentle read with chuckles guaranteed.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Toothache and murder, 21 April 2011
By 
Hamish is suffering from toothache. There is a dentist in a nearby town who has a bad reputation but a visit to him will save Hamish a long drive to Inverness. Reluctantly he makes an appointment but then changes it because the pain eases off after he is given antibiotics. When he finally makes it to the dentist he is surprised to find the Mr Gilchrist dead in his own chair.

What follows is a many layered plot which includes a new love interest for Hamish in the shape of a tourist who is good with computers. There are illicit stills and a dangerous situation for Hamish as he sets about investigating the mystery on his own and in his own inimitable way. I enjoyed this story even though the first few chapters set my teeth on edge! There are some interesting characters and some fascinating motivations.

On the face of it the Hamish Macbeth series is light reading but there are undertones which are much deeper and darker. The harsh life in the Highlands and the differing moralities between groups of people are well portrayed. This is an enjoyable read for anyone who likes their crime stories to revolve around character rather than violence.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Death of a Dentist, 30 July 2010
By 
G. Leader "Gwen Leader" (England) - See all my reviews
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Good old Hamish he's like the mounties he always gets his man, or woman as the case may be, and this book was no exception.

Brilliant read.
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