Customer Reviews


82 Reviews
5 star:
 (47)
4 star:
 (21)
3 star:
 (6)
2 star:
 (6)
1 star:
 (2)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


39 of 42 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Deaver has still got it!
All of Jeffrey Deavers books are thoroughly enjoyable and this one is no exception. Typically the plot twists and turns quickly. Although I have read most of his books and am used to his style he does still catch me out. Deavers attention to detail is remarkable, whether it is accurate or not isn't the point, the point is he is convincing. This book focuses on 'data...
Published on 20 Sept. 2008 by M. J. Fox

versus
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars More like broken record
This was far from one of Deaver's best efforts. It was tedious and unimaginative and read more like a Michael Moore polemic than a novel only joining the bandwagon far too late.
It was far-fetched also - even in these days there is information that is privileged and it would be illegal for data gatherers to obtain specific details about health records, credit cards...
Published on 20 Jan. 2013 by daisycow


‹ Previous | 1 29 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

39 of 42 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Deaver has still got it!, 20 Sept. 2008
By 
M. J. Fox (Camberley, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
All of Jeffrey Deavers books are thoroughly enjoyable and this one is no exception. Typically the plot twists and turns quickly. Although I have read most of his books and am used to his style he does still catch me out. Deavers attention to detail is remarkable, whether it is accurate or not isn't the point, the point is he is convincing. This book focuses on 'data mining' a company which collects and sells detailed information on the public for marketing and sales opportunities. Deaver doesnt judge just simply presents the argument for and against; police catching criminals vs invasion of privacy. But what makes this book so good is the interesting and enduring characters, especially the leading two Lincoln Rhyme and Amelia Sachs. Their relationship has developed and with each book we learn a little bit more about them. Enjoy.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


17 of 19 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good Techno- thriller from Deaver, 23 Jun. 2008
Lincoln Ryme is almost back to early form from Deaver. This is an intriguing techno- thriller. An unsub has access to ultimate information on anyone, and uses this to rape and kill, whilst at the same time planting evidence to convincinly frame some unwitting patsy of his crime. Lincoln and Amelia quickly home in on a data mining company where most executives are under the spot-light. This gives a decent game of cat and mouse with Lincoln as the master of evidence Vs the man with ultimate knowledge of data. Recommended.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Well-plotted, engaging detective page-turner, 31 Jan. 2010
By 
Kentspur (Er...Kent) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
Producing good stuff a long way into a lucrative, far-fetched series is not easy, but Jeffrey Deaver has pulled it off with this engaging, pacy thriller and he deserves much praise.

This novel is about the hunt for a killer who murders people then - using identity theft and evidence placement - puts a sap in the frame for the authorities to incarcerate. It's a strong premise and, even though Mr Deaver shows it early, he effortlessly creates a strong narrative around the kind of people and organisations that could do this stuff to anyone. Each twist is well-camouflaged and impactful and the over-arching universe - that there are people out there who know everything about you - is well-described and, candidly, terrifying. The killer - when revealed - is not stupid or absurd. He's in there - if you get the clues - yet unexpected; kudos to Mr Deaver. The points made about how much anyone with access to an internet account and specialist knowledge knows about you are very well made. More than that, Mr Deaver delivers a paranoid vision of the world that matches the seventies 'Parralax View' and echoes more recent thrillers about how the 'net can destroy you, but in a more diciplined and clinical fashion.

The main weakness of the book is that it is part of a series and the 'good guys' in this very strong story are a wheel-chair bound forensic specialist - Lincoln Rhyme - and his partner, a fashion-model-turned-cop called Amelia Sachs. You almost wince as these characters - heroes of previous Deaver works - are re-introduced as they are so cliched and stupid. I am sure when Mr Deaver had to sell the first in this series, a profoundly disabled forensics guy was engagingly different for literary agents and publishers; now it feels contrived and ridiculous. Frankly, if there had been different protagonists, this would have been a stunningly good thriller, one of the best I've read in years, but the 'business' around these cartoonish creations pulls the book down. Mr Deaver also repeatedly mentions a woman - Kathryn Dance - who isn't in the action at all - as she is the main protagonist of his next novel and puts in - totally ridiculous to British ears - passages about another killer being hunted by Scotland Yard, who is going to be in the next 'Lincoln Rhyme' thriller. Both utterly redundant in this story. To say this is crass commercialism is an understatement.

Given that, in some ways, I wanted to despise 'The Broken Window' as a cynical, CSI-rip-off tosh-fest, but the fact that I can't - and that I read it in a couple of days - is testament to Mr Deaver's skill. I would strongly recommend this book to anyone who wants a gripping, suspenseful thriller. Steely craft, perfect plotting and excellent exposition combine to deliver a wonderful, popular detective novel; a masterclass in page-turning.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Great Lincoln Rhyme Conspiracy Thriller, 18 Oct. 2009
By 
G. J. Oxley "Gaz" (Tyne & Wear, England) - See all my reviews
The latest Lincoln Rhyme novel features the recurring Jeffery Deaver topics of identity theft and the individual's right to privacy. As a former lawyer, Jeff has long been concerned with protecting both civil and personal liberty and with the growth of intrusive surveillance by both governmental and non-governmental agencies.

'The Broken Window' features yet another unhinged serial killer, and develops into the familiar game of cat and mouse between Rhyme, the brilliant quadriplegic forensic scientist, and a very clever criminal sociopath. The killer is an obsessive collector of all manner of consumer goods - the detritus of everyday life - and has access to personal computer data for the victims he targets.

It begins with Lincoln advising the (British) Metropolitan Police on the apprehension of a global professional killer. He's then informed that his estranged cousin Arthur has been arrested on suspicion of murder, and the case against him seems cast-iron. Naturally, under the Rhyme microscope, flaws are immediately spotted and Lincoln realises he's up against a cunning killer who murders at will, then frames innocent parties after stealing their identity. He places the Met case on hold and diverts his considerable brainpower to the task of apprehending the guilty party, and freeing Arthur.

His investigation leads to a cutting-edge data mining company - Strategic Systems Datacorps (SSD) - who among other things, maintain comprehensive profiles of every American citizen, which they sell to companies targeting a particular demographic. SSD also have a full range of other software programs - both analytical and predictive - which they claim to have developed for the greater good. Only when Rhyme's team get into the company's databases does the full extent of their snooping become apparent.

By page 80 we've already had two pieces of Deaver misdirection (both of which we've seen before - many times!) and I began to fear it would turn into the series of contrived scenarios that have marred two or three of the books in the series.

However, Jeffery manages to rein these in and supplies a number of satisfying twists near the end. To say that the book is meticulously researched (Jeff has his own team to do this), rigorously constructed and is completely ingenious, is a given. To say that the plot is totally implausible is another! But, his characterisation is, as usual, excellent and a comparatively mellow Lincoln Rhyme is assisted by the usual cast - his personal aide, Thom, the lovely Amelia Sachs, Lon Sellitto, Mel Cooper et al.

The kind of surveillance Jeff writes about here just isn't a reality at present, and this is where the book verges on science fiction. But that's no bad thing. Deaver even cites, and quotes from, two very early SF classics - `Brave New World' and `1984' to emphasize this point and to underline the dangers of a totalitarian society where `They' know everything about you.

As with all the Lincoln Rhyme books the plot of this techno-thriller is compressed into a few days - and this makes the book more immediate and lends it a real page-turning quality. I think few readers will be completely disappointed with this one and absolutely NO-ONE could ever accuse Jeff of not giving the reader his moneys' worth!

In the book's final few pages it becomes obvious who the subject of the next Rhyme thriller (due in 2010) will be - but to say any more would be to give the game away!

This isn't quite top-of-the-range Rhyme, but it's pretty good stuff. It's certainly better than 2007's fairly boring `The Sleeping Doll', featuring his new investigator Kathryn Dance - who's name-checked several times in here. I can see `The Broken Window' being read on a number of long holiday flights...
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent, 12 Sept. 2008
By 
M. V. Clarke (Durham, UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
Jeffery Deaver's Lincoln Rhyme series are well known for their depth of factual information, clever plotting, great characters and many twists, and the Broken Window is no exception. Here, Rhyme and Sachs are pitted against a computer expert intent on wreaking havoc and leaving many dead bodies and framing many innocent parties. One of the latter is Arthur Rhyme, cousin of Lincoln, and best friend of his childhood. Through his detention, Lincoln is brought into the case. The complex plot features a data-mining company, the US government, internet rights activists and high level law enforcement. The technical details, as expected, are thoroughly researched and presented in great detail, which gives complexity and interest to the plot; Rhyme's predilection for physical evidence also proves invaluable and the two combine into a fast-paced plot with the trademark Deaver twists and turns. Along the way, there's perhaps more human interest than is sometimes the case in this series; Rhyme often muses on his childhood and his relationship with Arthur, as well as the causes of its breakdown; Sachs, meanwhile, remains heavily involved with Pam, a character who reappeared in The Cold Moon. Rhyme is also involved with the London Metropolitan Police in a case that features the perpetrator from the Cold Moon, and which provides a nicely open ending...

Excellent - read it!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars 4 stars, 28 Jun. 2010
You often hear the old legend that our body is worth $4.50 for parts. Our digital identity is worth far more."
Awesome and frightening! Story of a perpetrator's use of data mining techniques to set up perfect crimes and frame perfect strangers for the crimes. If even half of the plot of this book is a possible reality, we must all "be afraid; be very, very afraid"!
While there is violence in this book related to the crimes committed, the graphic descriptions prevalent in too many crime novels is absent. Deaver does a magnificent job of keeping the main focus on the solving of the crimes rather than spending time over-describing every gory detail. I would say this would be a great movie, but I'm sure the producers would feel compelled to change the focus to the blood.
Characters are well developed and interesting. I wonder how he knows so much about the criminal mind, as the criminal in the story is one twisted individual.
"The future of data is the future of society."
"There is eternal existance. Just look at the trove of data about your life. Built the moment you are born, it's all permanent, copied, and indestructible. It's stored and backed up in a million places."
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Chilling thriller of our times, 8 May 2009
By 
A. Gastaldi "Ziggyann" (Milan, Italy) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Broken Window: 8 (0) (Paperback)
A very scary story concerning the Internet, data access and protection and what information we unwittingly give out..an IT novel which everyone who uses the Net should read!!Broken Window
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars More like broken record, 20 Jan. 2013
This was far from one of Deaver's best efforts. It was tedious and unimaginative and read more like a Michael Moore polemic than a novel only joining the bandwagon far too late.
It was far-fetched also - even in these days there is information that is privileged and it would be illegal for data gatherers to obtain specific details about health records, credit cards etc - they can amass only pooled data.
Also extreme was the way in which a "wrong receipt" lead to the right neighbourhood, in the same way as Rhymes seeing the "murderer" over someone else's shoulder on CCTV. Novelists should not rely on deus ex machina to get them out of a fix.
There were no thrills or intrigue, no interest in cardboard character: it was pedestrian all the way through and there was really nothing to redeem it. I'd recommend a pass.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


17 of 20 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Great Lincoln Rhyme Conspiracy Thriller, 27 July 2008
By 
G. J. Oxley "Gaz" (Tyne & Wear, England) - See all my reviews
The latest Lincoln Rhyme novel features the recurring Jeffery Deaver topics of identity theft and the individual's right to privacy. As a one-time lawyer, Jeff has long been concerned with protecting both civil and personal liberty and the growth of intrusive surveillance employed by certain agencies.

'The Broken Window' has yet another unhinged serial killer, and develops into the familiar game of cat and mouse between Rhyme, the brilliant quadriplegic forensic scientist, and a very clever criminal sociopath. This killer is an obsessive collector of all manner of consumer goods - the detritus of everyday life - and has access to personal computer data for the victims he targets.

It begins with Lincoln advising the Metropolitan Police on the apprehension of a global professional killer when he's informed that his cousin Arthur - who he grew up with prior to their falling-out - has been arrested on suspicion of murder, and the case against him seems cast-iron. Naturally, flaws are immediately spotted under the Rhyme microscope and Lincoln realises he's up against a cunning killer who murders at will, then frames innocent parties after stealing their identity. He places the other case on hold and diverts his considerable brainpower to the task of apprehending the guilty party, and thus liberating Arthur.

His investigation leads to a cutting-edge data mining company - Strategic Systems Datacorps (SSD) - who among other things, maintain comprehensive profiles of every American citizen, which they sell to companies targeting a particular demographic. SSD also have a full range of other software programs - both analytical and predictive - which they claim to have developed for the greater good. Only when Rhyme's team get into the company's databases does the full extent of their snooping become apparent.

By page 80 we've already had two pieces of Deaver misdirection (both of which we've seen before - many times!) and I began to fear it would turn into the series of contrived scenarios that have marred two or three of the books in the series.

But no, Jeffery reins these in and supplies a number of satisfying twists near the end. To say that the book is meticulously researched (Jeff has his own team to do this), rigorously constructed and is completely ingenious, is a given. To say that the plot is totally implausible is another! But, his characterisation is, as usual, excellent and a comparatively mellow Lincoln Rhyme is assisted by the usual cast - his personal aide, Thom, the lovely Amelia Sachs, Lon Sellitto, Mel Cooper et al.

The kind of surveillance Jeff writes about here just isn't a reality at present, and this is where the book verges on science fiction. But that's no bad thing. Deaver even cites, and quotes from, two very early SF classics - `Brave New World' and `1984' to emphasize this point and to underline the dangers of a totalitarian society where `They' know everything about you.

As with all the Lincoln Rhyme books the main span of this techno-thriller is compressed into a very short space of time - around three days - and this makes the book more immediate and lends it a real page-turning quality. I would think that few will be completely disappointed with this one and absolutely NO-ONE could ever accuse Jeff of not giving the reader his moneys' worth!

In the book's final few pages it becomes obvious who the subject of the next Rhyme thriller will be - but to say any more would be to give the game away!

This isn't quite top-of-the-range Lincoln Rhyme, but it's pretty good stuff. It's certainly better than last year's fairly boring `The Sleeping Doll', featuring his new investigator Kathryn Dance - who's name-checked several times in here. I can see `The Broken Window being read on a number of long flights this summer...
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fairly Good Thriller, 3 Dec. 2008
By 
J.Flood (Dublin,Ireland) - See all my reviews
In this one, Lincoln Rhyme, Amelia Sachs et al, are on the trail of a serial killer who has murdered a number of people, and has been able to set up innocent persons, with no connection to the crime, to take the fall. The most recent person the killer has set up, is none other than Lincoln's cousin, Arthur Rhyme.

I found this novel a reasonably enjoyable read. The characterisation and plot are good, as always, and the author has certainly thought up a particularly nasty and evil killer, in this story.

There is less twists in the plot also, in comparison with recent Jeffery Deaver novels, which is no bad thing, and the whole 'data mining' part of the storyline would make me think twice about ever taking part in a survey again!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 29 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Only search this product's reviews